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Superdelegates

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NEWS
April 17, 1988 | By Mike Sante, Inquirer Washington Bureau Gerald B. Jordan and Matthew Purdy of the Inquirer Washington Bureau contributed to this article
Selection of the superdelegates - the party leaders and elected officials chosen to bring political wisdom and experience to the Democratic National Convention this summer - is well under way, but most of them have not decided whom to support. And the ranks of the uncommitted will continue to swell as Congress finishes choosing its 253 superdelegates next week. Of the 646 superdelegates, 576 had been chosen and contacted as of midday Friday, and 81 of them were supporting Massachusetts Gov. Michael S. Dukakis.
NEWS
April 4, 1988 | By GAR JOSEPH, Daily News Staff Writer
Pennsylvania Democratic State Committee Chairman Larry Yatch has this vision: Atlanta. July 20. Third night of the Democratic National Convention. On the first ballot, the Rev. Jesse Jackson and Massachusetts Gov. Michael Dukakis each fall more than 400 votes short of the 2,082 needed to win the nomination for president. The Babbitt and Gephardt and Simon delegates have been picked clean. Delegates loyal to Sen. Albert Gore Jr. of Tennessee hold firm, hoping the deadlocked convention will turn to their man. Pennsylvania's 203 delegates, uncommitted after the first ballot, look to Gov. Casey and the state's other 24 superdelegates for guidance.
NEWS
April 24, 2008 | By Mario F. Cattabiani and Nancy Petersen INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Despite Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton's solid win Tuesday in Pennsylvania, the state's six remaining uncommitted superdelegates are not yet prepared to choose a side. They are opting instead to let voters in the remaining primaries have their say. "There is not a rush for us to come in and intervene," said Rep. Mike Doyle, from the state's southwest corner. "The people of Pennsylvania got a chance to speak. I don't have a problem letting other folks have their say, either. " The state has 29 Democratic superdelegates.
NEWS
July 23, 2016
By Joe Trippi and Simon Rosenberg Next week, our party will meet in the City of Brotherly Love and Sisterly Affection to nominate our candidate for president of the United States. We hope that Democrats will emerge unified in support of Hillary Clinton, in opposition to Donald Trump, and formidable enough to win the presidency and make gains in other offices across the country. We have supported Clinton throughout this primary, but we believe that Sen. Bernie Sanders and his supporters have made the party stronger and have pointed toward legitimate concerns about the voice that rank-and-file Americans have in our governance structures and political processes.
NEWS
July 25, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
A bitter dispute over Democratic Party rules that critics say enhance the power of insiders over rank-and-file voters came to a head Saturday when a key party committee defeated a proposal to end the role of so-called superdelegates. But proponents of the reform measure said they are undeterred, and promised a floor fight at the party's national convention later this week. "I think this was a missed opportunity," said state Rep. Diane Russell of Maine, who promised that backers of the measure would take the proposal to the full convention, which starts Monday at the Wells Fargo Center.
NEWS
March 27, 1988 | By Robert S. Boyd, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Almost without public fanfare, the biggest single "primary" of the 1988 presidential campaign - one that could settle the Democratic nomination - is already under way. It's the contest for 645 superdelegates - a prize pack of professional politicians, ranging from former President Jimmy Carter to the Democratic National Committee member from American Samoa - who are guaranteed seats at the national convention in Atlanta this summer. If the present logjam among the five surviving candidates continues, the superdelegates might have the numbers and clout to push the Democrat they think has the best chance of winning in November over the top. Most of them are still uncommitted and intend to stay that way until the final primaries in California and New Jersey on June 7. "As a superdelegate, I should stay uncommitted as long as I can," said Karen Gottovi, a member of the Democratic National Committee (DNC)
NEWS
June 11, 2016 | By Emma Platoff, Staff Writer
As he celebrated a hard-fought win in his congressional primary against 25-year-old challenger Alex Law on Tuesday night, Rep. Donald Norcross shared the room - and the spotlight - with a watch party for presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton. And yet, he and George E. Norcross III, two brothers behind one of New Jersey's most powerful political machines, are the only two of the state's 16 party "superdelegates" who have not yet publicly committed to a presidential candidate.
NEWS
April 1, 2008 | By Scot Lehigh
It's the Democrats' nightmare scenario: a bitter nominating fight that lasts all the way to the national convention in late August, giving Republican John McCain a clear field for the summer, and leaving their own party split and dispirited even after they settle upon a standard-bearer. And there's increasing reason to be worried. Although this campaign was informative and relatively mild for most of the winter, it has grown markedly more divisive in the last few weeks, with charges and recriminations flying.
NEWS
April 24, 2008 | By Larry Eichel INQUIRER SENIOR WRITER
Turning their attention to Indiana, site of a crucial May 6 contest, Hillary Rodham Clinton and Barack Obama argued yesterday over how the undecided Democratic superdelegates should judge the race from here on. In addition, the Clinton campaign, rejuvenated by its 200,000-plus-vote victory in Pennsylvania, reported that it expected to have raised $10 million online in the 24 hours after the declaration of her victory Tuesday night. The money is desperately needed by an organization that, as of April 1, reported it had $9 million in the bank and owed $10 million.
NEWS
February 10, 2008 | By Larry Eichel INQUIRER SENIOR WRITER
Neither Hillary Rodham Clinton nor Barack Obama is going to win the Democratic presidential nomination based on the primaries alone. At this point, it's just about mathematically impossible. That's the central reality of the race now that Super Tuesday has come and gone. The contests yet to come - including Maryland, Virginia and the District of Columbia on Tuesday; Texas and Ohio on March 4; and Pennsylvania on April 22 - remain tremendously important. But the object of the game has changed: Now the idea behind winning primaries is to gain momentum and thereby impress the 796 superdelegates, most of them party and elected officials.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 26, 2016
ISSUE | CAMPAIGN 2016 Rigged Dem system I agree with the commentary arguing that the superdelegate system is antidemocratic (" End the antidemocratic superdelegate system ," Friday). The Democratic Party's claim to equal representation is utterly bankrupt when it gives party insiders and donors voting power that is independent of the will of the people. However, I disagree with the claim that superdelegates did not play a role in giving Clinton her party's nomination.
NEWS
July 25, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
A bitter dispute over Democratic Party rules that critics say enhance the power of insiders over rank-and-file voters came to a head Saturday when a key party committee defeated a proposal to end the role of so-called superdelegates. But proponents of the reform measure said they are undeterred, and promised a floor fight at the party's national convention later this week. "I think this was a missed opportunity," said state Rep. Diane Russell of Maine, who promised that backers of the measure would take the proposal to the full convention, which starts Monday at the Wells Fargo Center.
NEWS
July 23, 2016
By Joe Trippi and Simon Rosenberg Next week, our party will meet in the City of Brotherly Love and Sisterly Affection to nominate our candidate for president of the United States. We hope that Democrats will emerge unified in support of Hillary Clinton, in opposition to Donald Trump, and formidable enough to win the presidency and make gains in other offices across the country. We have supported Clinton throughout this primary, but we believe that Sen. Bernie Sanders and his supporters have made the party stronger and have pointed toward legitimate concerns about the voice that rank-and-file Americans have in our governance structures and political processes.
NEWS
June 12, 2016
A story Friday incorrectly reported the affiliations of New Jersey's Democratic Party presidential primary superdelegates. Of the 16 superdelegates, 14 had committed. Twelve favored presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and two favored Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders.
NEWS
June 11, 2016 | By Emma Platoff, Staff Writer
As he celebrated a hard-fought win in his congressional primary against 25-year-old challenger Alex Law on Tuesday night, Rep. Donald Norcross shared the room - and the spotlight - with a watch party for presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton. And yet, he and George E. Norcross III, two brothers behind one of New Jersey's most powerful political machines, are the only two of the state's 16 party "superdelegates" who have not yet publicly committed to a presidential candidate.
NEWS
June 9, 2016 | By Maddie Hanna, Emma Platoff, and Erin Serpico, STAFF WRITERS
Hillary Clinton claimed a historic achievement as the first woman chosen as a major party nominee for president Tuesday, an announcement she made after winning New Jersey's Democratic primary. The Associated Press called the New Jersey race for her over Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders at 9:04 p.m. Tuesday, a little more than an hour after polls closed. "Thanks to you, we've reached a milestone," Clinton told supporters Tuesday night not far from her campaign headquarters in Brooklyn, N.Y., after the New Jersey race was called and results from other states were coming in, but before California polls closed.
NEWS
June 3, 2016 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
A federal judge in Trenton last week cited the Democratic Party's use of superdelegates before dismissing a motion that alleged superdelegates at a South Jersey mini-convention had unfairly skewed the endorsements ahead of Tuesday's primary. Two freeholder candidates who failed to get the endorsement of the Ocean County Democratic Committee sought to knock congressional candidate Jim Keady and others from the ballot, saying they unfairly received the local party's backing. U.S. District Judge Freda L. Wolfson rejected the motion for an injunction Thursday, saying the plaintiffs waited too long to come to court, nearly two months after the March 19 mini-convention in Ocean County.
NEWS
May 9, 2016 | By Tom Fitzgerald, Staff Writer
As the primary season winds down, Hillary Clinton's campaign focused Saturday on the upcoming New Jersey primary with several events in Burlington and Camden Counties designed to organize get-out-the-vote efforts. The events came a day before Democratic rival Sen. Bernie Sanders was scheduled for a massive rally at Rutgers University in Piscataway. He also will campaign in Atlantic City on Monday morning. Clinton, the former secretary of state, first lady, and U.S senator from New York, has a wide lead in the race for the Democratic nomination.
NEWS
April 12, 2016
The numbers in parentheses are each candidate's percentage of all party delegates awarded to date. REPUBLICANS To win nomination: 1,237 Donald Trump (47) 742 Ted Cruz (32) 516 John Kasich (9) 143 Total awarded* 1,588 DEMOCRATS To win nomination: 2,384 Hillary Clinton (55) 1,305 Bernie Sanders (45) 1,086 Total awarded** 2,391 * Includes 187 won by other candidates. ** Does not include superdelegates, party leaders free to support the candidate of their choice.
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