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Superfund

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NEWS
October 31, 1991 | By RALPH W. SISKIND and BARRY M. KLAYMAN
In a recent article on this page, U.S. Rep. Robert Torricelli (D., N.J.) argued that corporations that bring suit under the Superfund statute - to ensure that all liable parties contribute their fair share of cleanup costs - somehow undermine the Superfund program. Torricelli points to the difficulties experienced by targeted municipalities and proposes that they be excluded from liability even though their wastes contain hazardous materials. By focusing on this narrow issue, however, Torricelli fails to address the root problem - the inefficiency and ineffectiveness of the Superfund liabiity scheme created by Congress.
NEWS
February 5, 1986
One day after the Environmental Protection Agency announced plans to shut down the federal Superfund toxic-waste cleanup program for lack of funds, EPA Administrator Lee M. Thomas went before the Senate Environment Committee last week with a compromise of sorts. If Congress would provide temporary financing while House and Senate conferees ironed out differences on reauthorization bills, cleanup could continue. Congress should accept the compromise, but with conditions. Nobody wants Superfund contractors to pack up their moon suits and walk away from 170 sites that at last are being cleaned up. Yet, without additional money, that urgent work can't continue.
NEWS
July 23, 1986
The final version of the Superfund reauthorization legislation at last may be emerging from a House-Senate conference committee. Eleventh-hour changes are being debated, with most of the work due to be completed by week's end. Once that's done, conferees will try to work out the other troublesome stumbling block - funding. A quick compromise may be possible. If Superfund is to do its job, it must include these program components: State statutes of limitations must be changed as they apply to injuries from toxic waste.
NEWS
July 14, 1986
No environmental issue is more pressing than the cleanup of abandoned toxic waste dumps. Congress is working on legislation to put another $8.5 billion into the Superfund to pay for the next five years of cleanup, six times more than the fund received in its first five years. This large increase has prompted a serious debate over the best way to finance Superfund. Information put together by the Environmental Protection Agency shows that the broadest spectrum of business is responsible for abandoned dumps.
NEWS
August 4, 1986
Now that the finishing touches have been placed on the $8.5 billion federal Superfund reauthorization bill, one important question remains: Who picks up the tab? The oil and chemical industries, which shouldered most of the burden during Superfund's first six years of existence, think it's high time for some other industries to get into the act. They claim that just 12 petrochemical companies paid 70 percent of the $1.38 billion raised to clean up abandoned hazardous waste sites between 1980 and 1985.
NEWS
May 3, 1989 | By Cynthia Burton, Daily News Staff Writer
Removing asbestos from the School District's more than 400 buildings could cost a staggering $500 million that ought to be spent on long-delayed repairs, Superintendent Constance E. Clayton said yesterday. "The extraordinary costs of asbestos control threatens to undermine the system's commitment to the long-deferred major renovations of our school buildings," Clayton said at a press conference. She called on Congress to create a national "superfund" to pay for asbestos cleanup in schools throughout the country.
NEWS
August 11, 1988
A funny thing happened after the Pennsylvania House unanimously passed a strong, carefully balanced toxic dump cleanup bill in June. The cheering had hardly died down from the governor's office and the state's environmental lobby, when business rolled up its sleeves and went to work. The result, only weeks later, was an anemic, watered-down Senate bill: All manner of industries were exempted; a fee on hazardous wastes had disappeared; clean-up standards got mushy and a whopping tax-break appeared - a break that, according to critics, matched the amount the superfund would raise.
NEWS
October 29, 1986 | By Russell Wild
Here boy. Sit. The new Superfund bill, signed into law by a begrudging President Reagan on Oct. 17, is being sold by the administration and the chemical and oil industries as a luscious treat for us environmentalists - and - wag, wag - if we're really, really good - we may get our Clean Water Bill too. Yes, the new Superfund bill is a treat: There's now more money to clean up toxic waste sites, we have some kind of schedule for cleanup, victims'...
NEWS
January 13, 1986 | By Paul Horvitz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
It has been five years since Bridgeport Rental & Oil Services Inc. halted its waste-oil operations in Gloucester County. In that time, the defunct business, consisting of a blackened, poisonous 12-acre lagoon and rows of rusting tanks, has become the focus of one of the most costly decontamination operations in the state. An estimated $15 million has been spent or authorized for the task so far. Most has been spent on emergency work, planning a fresh-water pipeline for neighbors with polluted wells and devising a long-term plan for cleaning up the site.
NEWS
June 26, 1988 | By John Hall, Special to The Inquirer
The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) plans to add the former Raymark Industries property in Hatboro to the Superfund cleanup list, the federal government's designation of the most serious hazardous-waste sites. The Jacksonville Road property and underground water supplies were contaminated by a suspected carcinogen between 1948 and 1979 by companies that have since merged with Raymark, EPA officials said. The inclusion of the property in the $8.5 billion Superfund program will allow the EPA to study the extent of the pollution and options for a cleanup of the chemical trichloroethylene, or TCE, a spokeswoman for the EPA, Nanci Sinclair, said.
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REAL_ESTATE
August 8, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, REAL ESTATE WRITER
New Kensington Community Development Corp. wasn't sure that "Awesometown" was the right name for its 14-home, mixed-income development lying between Moyer and East Thompson Streets in Fishtown. But Postgreen Homes, which had been "doing interesting things in the neighborhood," in the words of New Kensington executive director Sandy Saltzman, was the partner in the project, and the name "fit into its brand of marketing. " Not surprisingly, "people gravitated to it," Saltzman said, adding that "every time we talk about it, they say that it is 'awesome.' " It is awesome, in many respects, not the least of which is that all 14 homes - 10 market-rate and four affordable - have been sold, even as the four East Thompson Street houses and the driveways for the project are in the final weeks of construction.
NEWS
April 12, 2016 | By Rita Giordano, Staff Writer
Could a soon-to-be released report prove to be the catalyst for the saving of Kirkwood Lake? The lake's long-frustrated neighbors and Camden County officials are certainly hoping that will be the case. At a public meeting Thursday night at the Voorhees Town Center, Emery Coppola Jr., a scientist with the county-contracted Sadat Associates, disclosed key, preliminary findings of the firm's study: Contaminants such as lead and arsenic from the Superfund site that Kirkwood is part of are flowing into the lake and downstream to the Cooper River, with little to stop them as the lake grows shallower.
NEWS
April 9, 2016 | By Rita Giordano, Staff Writer
A soon-to-be released report commissioned by Camden County is expected to bring greater potency to residents' and county officials' demands for the dredging of Kirkwood Lake. The report by Sadat Associates will claim that contamination from the upstream Superfund site is entering the lake and passing downstream to the Cooper River, according to Emery Coppola Jr. of Sadat. It will also say the lake is threatened without dredging. Preliminary findings of the report were discussed at a public meeting Thursday night at Voorhees Town Center.
NEWS
December 25, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
The largest urban renewal project in the nation's history has officially come to an end. A half-century after beginning the remaking of Philadelphia's Eastwick section - over the protests of residents, more than 8,000 of whom were displaced in the process - the Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority and a developer have reached a settlement to end that 1961 redevelopment deal. Community members and environmental activists cheered at the close of a special meeting Wednesday, as PRA's board agreed to pay $5 million to New Eastwick Corp., a joint venture of Korman Corp., to buy out its interest in the last 135 acres of vacant land.
NEWS
November 9, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Named one of the most toxic dumps in the nation three decades ago, the weed-choked L&D Landfill in South Jersey has long been idle, towering above a busy four-lane highway that connects strip malls with farmland. But in recent months, the 200-acre former landfill in Burlington County has been a hub of activity as 150 workers install nearly 42,000 gleaming solar panels - carefully - a few feet above the clay cap that environmental agencies long ago ordered to protect the public from the hazardous chemicals buried below.
NEWS
June 24, 2015 | By Erin McCarthy, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency officials stood in front of a verdant baseball diamond Monday morning in Camden. The field used to be a landfill where folks from across the city dumped their trash, including chemicals and medical waste. "As I look out behind me, I remember what it once was," U.S. Rep. Donald Norcross (D., N.J) said. But Norcross joined EPA officials not to tout a mission accomplished, but instead to focus on an area behind the ball field and playground, a part of the former landfill site that is not yet ready for development.
NEWS
June 4, 2015 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
Neighbors of Camden County's contaminated Kirkwood Lake got some good news and some bad news this week. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced a proposed $14 million major cleanup of a federal Superfund site in Gibbsboro and Voorhees. The contaminated cluster of miles of land and waterways includes the county-owned lake. The area, one of more than 100 Superfund sites remaining in New Jersey, was contaminated by paint-makers that operated in the area from the mid-1800s until the late 1970s.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2015 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nic Esposito is at once a romantic and a realist, and both inform his passions: farming, telling stories, and advocating for fresh, local food for all. Now, with Kensington Homestead , his second book and first attempt at nonfiction, Esposito, 32, is emerging as a literary voice for the wildly vibrant farm community in Philadelphia. His 14-essay collection chronicles the joys and frustrations of growing crops in uber-urban East Kensington, where the forces of gentrification press relentlessly through the swirl of entrenched poverty.
NEWS
October 20, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joe Amento, a lifelong resident of Ambler, was 53 when he died of a rare cancer with one main cause - exposure to asbestos. He was fine at Christmas 2002. In January, a pain in his side kept him awake at night. He was found to have the disease in March. Before August, he was gone. He left a wife, two children, and a community that to this day wrestles with the uncertain legacy of the huge asbestos factories that once brought the town jobs and prosperity, then sickness and death.
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