CollectionsSuperhero
IN THE NEWS

Superhero

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2010 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Comic book writer John Arcudi hates superheroes. Always has. Always will. A strange admission for the creator of one of the year's most critically acclaimed superhero graphic novels, a god somewhere (WildStorm, $24.99). "I was never really interested in superhero comics when I was a kid," says the Philadelphia author in an eyebrow-raising statement. "To me, the whole idea of superhuman beings is so ridiculous. . . . I find them absolutely impossible to understand.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2004 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
From Brooklyn, Philadelphia and Jerusalem come the directors in the seventh annual New Filmmakers Weekend at the Gershman Y with films that trace the genealogy of a settee, the anatomy of a photograph, and the fantasy of a youth. Pearl Gluck's documentary feature Divan is the saga of a settee owned by the filmmaker's great-great-grandfather in Hungary. In exploring the history of the mystics and rabbis who slept on it, Gluck spins a story that connects old and new world. In their short The Unbelievable Truth, Nathan Caswell and Jeremiah Zagar explore how often the drama of getting that photograph sometimes exceeds that of the event framed.
NEWS
June 25, 2007 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
Ke'sha'ndre, called Sha'ndre by his friends, enjoys being active - playing basketball, swinging on a swing set, riding a waterslide and going to the park. Recently, the 6-year-old visited the Garden State Discovery Museum, where he eagerly explored everything. He listened to his heartbeat, made an imprint of his face, piloted a car along a pretend turnpike, and visited the animal clinic, where he hooked a leash on a stuffed dog and took it for a walk. Ke'sha'ndre gets along well with other children and with adults.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2010 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
With her Eastwood-worthy snarl, a purple wig that would do a Vegas stripper proud, and the martial arts chops of a John Woo assassin, 11-year-old Mindy Macready, also known as Hit Girl, is a force to be reckoned with. A potty-mouthed pip-squeak trained in weaponry and weird sidelong glances by her cop-turned-vigilante freakazoid father - Big Daddy, played with typically nutty gusto by Nicolas Cage - Mindy doesn't have the title role in Kick-Ass, but her presence is everything. Chloe Moretz, a 13-year-old who has already amassed more than 30 credits on her IMDB page, gives a performance of prodigious cool.
NEWS
June 16, 1992 | by Scott Huler, Daily News Staff Writer
We all agree that Batman is a swell superhero, but still, something about him fails to satisfy. According to the endless hype, Batman is supposed to be this vigilante character who's acting out our collective fantasies of overcoming the seemingly insurmountable problems in our chaotic lives. If that's what he's trying to do, maybe he should find another line of work. Because most people today have trouble identifying with Batman. Serious trouble. It's not the double life, and it's not the danger, either.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2007
THE CLOSER. 9 tonight, TNT. IN TNT'S "THE Closer," Corey Reynolds plays Sgt. David Gabriel, who occasionally bumps heads with his boss, Deputy Police Chief Brenda Johnson (Kyra Sedgwick), over his by-the-book approach to solving crime. Offscreen, though, Reynolds is all about the comic books, not the rule books, and the only head-bumping he's likely to be doing is against anyone who might stand in the way of his dream of playing the Green Lantern on the big screen. Sgt. Gabriel probably doesn't go home and read comics, Reynolds conceded during a recent swing through Philadelphia, "but one thing that I love about portraying a smart, well-spoken, articulate character who's a good guy on television is that it sets me up . . . in the way I want to be seen.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2008 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Tony Stark, a most dissolute and disarming arms manufacturer, builds flamethrowers in the basement. For kicks. The bucks aren't bad, either. Sporting wit (and goatee) sharp as a survival knife, Robert Downey Jr. is the billionaire bon vivant in Iron Man, the fast, funny and deliriously entertaining flick based on Marvel Comics' self-made superhero. Unlike genetic and environmental supers, this weapons whiz gives himself superpowers. A hard-drinking inventor/playboy/businessman, Tony is a hybrid of Howard Hughes and Hugh Hefner, 1950s fantasy figures gene-spliced for 2008.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2003 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
He's a painkiller junkie in head-to-toe leather the color of spilled blood. He swoops through the cityscape in the dead of night, whacking slimeballs with his fancy billy club. He wears a pointy-eared cowl. And he's got Ben Affleck's dimpled chin. Daredevil, based on Marvel Comics' sight-impaired superhero - a blind man whose remaining senses are preternaturally fine-tuned - has been brought to the screen with a mix of jaunty humor and jagged violence that should have worked more effectively than it does.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2010 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
Among those surprised at the sleeper success of "Despicable Me," no doubt, were the folks at DreamWorks Animation, and not in a good way. "Despicable Me" covers much of the same ground - halfhearted evil genius finally gives in to his sentimental side - as their new 3-D movie "Megamind," and does it a little better. "Megamind," though, is by no means a knockoff, and if you get past the eerie coincidences (characters named Minion, the lead's mangled diction), you see that it stakes out different territory, playing around with superhero mythology (especially Superman)
NEWS
July 10, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ryan Brady was volunteering at Cooper's Poynt School in Camden, helping 5- and 6-year-old kindergartners with early reading and math skills, when he noticed something super about their wardrobe and backpack choices. "The kids there, they all have Batman, Superman, Spider-Man, all these superheroes from faraway cities," Brady said. "I thought, maybe if they had a superhero who was from their city, they'd have something to be excited about. " Thus, the Bolt was born. Brady, 25, a self-described geek who has loved comic books since before he could read, created Sean, a college student at Ruttledge-Camden (a stand-in for Rutgers-Camden)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 24, 2016 | By Shaun Brady, For Inquirer
Sure, summer blockbusters offer a few hours' respite to give your brain a vacation and escape into the air-conditioned comfort of your local multiplex. But three months is a long time to subsist on a visual diet of nothing more than caped crime-fighters, wisecracking animals, gunshots, explosions, and tire squeals. A number of local film series provide an offbeat alternative, celebrating the independent and the outrageous on a regular basis. Philadelphia Unnamed Film Festival (PUFF)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2016 | By Kimberly Garrison
EVERYBODY WANTS to be a superhero, right? I know I did when I was younger. I remember imagining myself as a combination of Isis and Wonder Woman - with a dash of Pam Grier - slaying enemies while maintaining a beautifully untamed Afro. That's right, I was a super-duper-fly superheroine! In hindsight, I am sure my early interest in fitness and weight training was influenced by my superheroine fantasies. So, with Wizard World Comic Con in Philly this Thursday through Sunday, I thought it was only fitting that I give superheroes a shout-out for how the genre positively influenced my life.
SPORTS
April 24, 2016 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
WASHINGTON - There's a thrilling sequence in the movie The Dark Knight in which Batman upends an oncoming tractor trailer driven by the Joker. The truck flips over vertically, a crash that ought to have left no survivors, yet somehow the Joker pulls himself out of the wreckage, throws his shoulders back, and stands in the middle of street, daring the bigger, stronger superhero to come after him again. He shouts, "COME ON! HIT ME!" And Batman revs up the Batcycle and speeds straight at him, only to veer away at the last instant, leaving his nemesis standing there, triumphant, ready to continue their confrontation.
NEWS
April 3, 2016 | By John N. McGuire, Staff Writer
For the last four years, musician Nick Wright has composed music for vocal groups at Cherry Hill High School East. On Saturday, the students will give back with 25 performances to benefit Wright's girlfriend, Ali Webb, in a night-time fund-raiser to help with her mounting medical bills. Wright, 25, of Cincinnati, said Webb, 24, was diagnosed with liver cancer in May 2015. Since then, the cancer has spread into her right lung, moving her to Stage 4. Wright said he met his girlfriend during their freshman year at Miami University while the two were playing in the school's marching band.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2016 | By Jerome Maida, For the Daily News
In all of Hollywood history, there have been 139 comic book adaptations to the silver screen. It only seems as if that many will be released in the next two years. The reason for the surge? Success. Let's start with the enormous success of Deadpool , one of the Top 10 Marvel-based films ever as far as tickets sold, and which is still going strong in theaters. The long-predicted "superhero fatigue" not only hasn't materialized, there's also no sign of it on the horizon.
NEWS
March 15, 2016 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Staff Writer
In the comic book world of author Pearl S. Buck, the superhero is on a crusade without a cape, mask, or phone booth for a quick change. Johnny Everyman, a civil engineer by day and night, fights for ethnic and racial justice using only his powers of persuasion. Billed as the "friend of the people of many lands," Everyman was the Nobel Prize-winning writer's effort to spread a message of acceptance and cross-cultural understanding in the 1940s, when the world was at war and prejudice and xenophobia were widespread.
NEWS
September 11, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the mention of Flemish baroque artist Peter Paul Rubens and his masterpiece Prometheus Bound , the first thing that comes to mind probably is not Spider-Man. And yet - why not? Is Prometheus, the titan who defied Zeus and stole fire from Mount Olympus and then bestowed it on humanity any less a tortured superhero than Spidey? He suffered terribly for his heroic act of aid and defiance. The infuriated Zeus had him chained to a rock where, every night, an eagle descended and savagely ripped out his perpetually regenerating liver.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Spielberg: It won't last Superhero movies may dominate the box office right now, but the genre will soon be as dead as a dodo, as extinct as the dino. So Hollywood's premiere filmmaker, Steven Spielberg , tells the Associated Press. "We were around when the western died and there will be a time when the superhero movie goes the way of the western," says Spielberg, whose Cold War spy thriller, Bridge of Spies , starring Tom Hanks , opens Oct. 16. "These cycles have a finite time in popular culture.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
You see them in just about every movie about war zones: The local watering hole for expats staffed by folks who speak just about every language under the sun. They're dark, dank, ill-lit joints where unkempt, sweaty reporters mingle with chain-smoking local hustlers, thieves, and killers, and the assorted international spy. Ever wondered who runs these places? I mean, who would want to start a business like that? Meet Jacky, the hero of the remarkable French sitcom Kaboul Kitchen . The Canal+ show, which is about to go into its second season in France, has been made available for the first time for American audiences by the nonprofit TV channel and DVD distributor MHz Networks.
NEWS
July 17, 2015 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
SOONER or later, someone was going to make fun of the incredible hulking obesity of the "Avengers" franchise, so Marvel was smart to keep the jokes in-house. Its nimble, amusing new "Ant-Man" has fun deflating the run-on visual giganticism of other recent comic-book adaptations - here, the title character shrinks to the size of an insect. Smaller than a minion, less powerful than a Thomas the Tank Engine locomotive, unable to leap tall buildings in a single bound . . . He's played by Paul Rudd, well-suited to the role in his capacity as cinema's most engagingly self-effacing comedian.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|