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ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2010 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Comic book writer John Arcudi hates superheroes. Always has. Always will. A strange admission for the creator of one of the year's most critically acclaimed superhero graphic novels, a god somewhere (WildStorm, $24.99). "I was never really interested in superhero comics when I was a kid," says the Philadelphia author in an eyebrow-raising statement. "To me, the whole idea of superhuman beings is so ridiculous. . . . I find them absolutely impossible to understand.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2004 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
From Brooklyn, Philadelphia and Jerusalem come the directors in the seventh annual New Filmmakers Weekend at the Gershman Y with films that trace the genealogy of a settee, the anatomy of a photograph, and the fantasy of a youth. Pearl Gluck's documentary feature Divan is the saga of a settee owned by the filmmaker's great-great-grandfather in Hungary. In exploring the history of the mystics and rabbis who slept on it, Gluck spins a story that connects old and new world. In their short The Unbelievable Truth, Nathan Caswell and Jeremiah Zagar explore how often the drama of getting that photograph sometimes exceeds that of the event framed.
NEWS
June 25, 2007 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
Ke'sha'ndre, called Sha'ndre by his friends, enjoys being active - playing basketball, swinging on a swing set, riding a waterslide and going to the park. Recently, the 6-year-old visited the Garden State Discovery Museum, where he eagerly explored everything. He listened to his heartbeat, made an imprint of his face, piloted a car along a pretend turnpike, and visited the animal clinic, where he hooked a leash on a stuffed dog and took it for a walk. Ke'sha'ndre gets along well with other children and with adults.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2010 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
With her Eastwood-worthy snarl, a purple wig that would do a Vegas stripper proud, and the martial arts chops of a John Woo assassin, 11-year-old Mindy Macready, also known as Hit Girl, is a force to be reckoned with. A potty-mouthed pip-squeak trained in weaponry and weird sidelong glances by her cop-turned-vigilante freakazoid father - Big Daddy, played with typically nutty gusto by Nicolas Cage - Mindy doesn't have the title role in Kick-Ass, but her presence is everything. Chloe Moretz, a 13-year-old who has already amassed more than 30 credits on her IMDB page, gives a performance of prodigious cool.
NEWS
June 16, 1992 | by Scott Huler, Daily News Staff Writer
We all agree that Batman is a swell superhero, but still, something about him fails to satisfy. According to the endless hype, Batman is supposed to be this vigilante character who's acting out our collective fantasies of overcoming the seemingly insurmountable problems in our chaotic lives. If that's what he's trying to do, maybe he should find another line of work. Because most people today have trouble identifying with Batman. Serious trouble. It's not the double life, and it's not the danger, either.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2007
THE CLOSER. 9 tonight, TNT. IN TNT'S "THE Closer," Corey Reynolds plays Sgt. David Gabriel, who occasionally bumps heads with his boss, Deputy Police Chief Brenda Johnson (Kyra Sedgwick), over his by-the-book approach to solving crime. Offscreen, though, Reynolds is all about the comic books, not the rule books, and the only head-bumping he's likely to be doing is against anyone who might stand in the way of his dream of playing the Green Lantern on the big screen. Sgt. Gabriel probably doesn't go home and read comics, Reynolds conceded during a recent swing through Philadelphia, "but one thing that I love about portraying a smart, well-spoken, articulate character who's a good guy on television is that it sets me up . . . in the way I want to be seen.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2008 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Tony Stark, a most dissolute and disarming arms manufacturer, builds flamethrowers in the basement. For kicks. The bucks aren't bad, either. Sporting wit (and goatee) sharp as a survival knife, Robert Downey Jr. is the billionaire bon vivant in Iron Man, the fast, funny and deliriously entertaining flick based on Marvel Comics' self-made superhero. Unlike genetic and environmental supers, this weapons whiz gives himself superpowers. A hard-drinking inventor/playboy/businessman, Tony is a hybrid of Howard Hughes and Hugh Hefner, 1950s fantasy figures gene-spliced for 2008.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2003 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
He's a painkiller junkie in head-to-toe leather the color of spilled blood. He swoops through the cityscape in the dead of night, whacking slimeballs with his fancy billy club. He wears a pointy-eared cowl. And he's got Ben Affleck's dimpled chin. Daredevil, based on Marvel Comics' sight-impaired superhero - a blind man whose remaining senses are preternaturally fine-tuned - has been brought to the screen with a mix of jaunty humor and jagged violence that should have worked more effectively than it does.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2010 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
Among those surprised at the sleeper success of "Despicable Me," no doubt, were the folks at DreamWorks Animation, and not in a good way. "Despicable Me" covers much of the same ground - halfhearted evil genius finally gives in to his sentimental side - as their new 3-D movie "Megamind," and does it a little better. "Megamind," though, is by no means a knockoff, and if you get past the eerie coincidences (characters named Minion, the lead's mangled diction), you see that it stakes out different territory, playing around with superhero mythology (especially Superman)
NEWS
July 10, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ryan Brady was volunteering at Cooper's Poynt School in Camden, helping 5- and 6-year-old kindergartners with early reading and math skills, when he noticed something super about their wardrobe and backpack choices. "The kids there, they all have Batman, Superman, Spider-Man, all these superheroes from faraway cities," Brady said. "I thought, maybe if they had a superhero who was from their city, they'd have something to be excited about. " Thus, the Bolt was born. Brady, 25, a self-described geek who has loved comic books since before he could read, created Sean, a college student at Ruttledge-Camden (a stand-in for Rutgers-Camden)
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NEWS
July 17, 2015 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
SOONER or later, someone was going to make fun of the incredible hulking obesity of the "Avengers" franchise, so Marvel was smart to keep the jokes in-house. Its nimble, amusing new "Ant-Man" has fun deflating the run-on visual giganticism of other recent comic-book adaptations - here, the title character shrinks to the size of an insect. Smaller than a minion, less powerful than a Thomas the Tank Engine locomotive, unable to leap tall buildings in a single bound . . . He's played by Paul Rudd, well-suited to the role in his capacity as cinema's most engagingly self-effacing comedian.
NEWS
July 13, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
Ant-Man is upon us. On Friday, another superhero heads to the multiplexes. A Silver Age brethren of Iron Man, Spider-Man, and Thor, Ant-Man is, um, a little different. Sure, he has the superhuman strength, the supercool costume, and the supersmart-alecky retorts of a Marvel Comics crimebuster. But this guy is less than an inch high, and if he joined his fellow Formicidae in an invasion of your kitchen pantry, you'd grab the Raid and gun him down with the rest of the pests. How can this tiny speck possibly do battle with evil masterminds bent on world domination?
NEWS
September 22, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard Pagan ran down an Adventure Aquarium ramp to see the crocodiles. Naequan Rivera played doctor on a large teddy bear. Allysa Lesher chatted with nurses about college. All that seemed impossible for the three South Jersey youths not so long ago. All were trauma victims whose lives were saved by quick-acting doctors and nurses at Cooper University Hospital. Richard, Naequan, and Lesher joined nearly 20 other children and their families Saturday at Cooper Hospital's Celebrate Life event at Adventure Aquarium.
NEWS
July 10, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ryan Brady was volunteering at Cooper's Poynt School in Camden, helping 5- and 6-year-old kindergartners with early reading and math skills, when he noticed something super about their wardrobe and backpack choices. "The kids there, they all have Batman, Superman, Spider-Man, all these superheroes from faraway cities," Brady said. "I thought, maybe if they had a superhero who was from their city, they'd have something to be excited about. " Thus, the Bolt was born. Brady, 25, a self-described geek who has loved comic books since before he could read, created Sean, a college student at Ruttledge-Camden (a stand-in for Rutgers-Camden)
NEWS
August 16, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
IN "KICK-ASS 2," tween girl superhero Hit-Girl agrees to take on a wannabe apprentice under the condition that he'll agree to do anything she wants. And what she wants can be summed up in two words. "Hit me. " And that, right there, is why this concept, even when it more or less worked in the original, has always made me queasy. The entire movie seemed constructed so that filmmakers could cross into some new transgressive space - showing an adult male throwing R-rated punches at the face of a young girl.
NEWS
June 17, 2013
Michael T. Dolan is a writer from West Chester At 4 years old, my son has just one problem in life, and it plagues him night after night. Lying in bed, a never-ending debate runs through his mind: Which superhero should he be when he gets big? Batman? Superman? Spider-Man? The Incredible Hulk? It's a difficult decision. Each, after all, is unique, offering a child endless possibilities in the way of costumes, superpowers, weapons, vehicles, and villains. I may not be a superhero, but as a father, I hope I'm providing him with the lessons he needs to become one. Here are a few that were handed down to me:   Lesson No. 1: Superheroes aren't perfect.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2013 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
The East Coast Black Age of Comics Convention converges on Philadelphia in two locations on Friday and Saturday with an awards ceremony, comic books, workshops for kids, a costume contest, and more. Convention festivities from 6:30 to 9 p.m. Friday at the African American Museum will include a free reception along with the annual Glyph awards ceremony honoring African American icons in the comic book industry. The convention continues from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday at the Enterprise Center in West Philadelphia, featuring the Kids' Library Zone (from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.)
NEWS
April 12, 2013 | By Ellen Gray
* DA VINCI'S DEMONS. 10 p.m. Friday, Starz.   A FEW EPISODES into "Da Vinci's Demons," Starz's latest foray into the world of historical fantasy, I realized I could either fight the superpower or go with it. And I decided to go with it. Created by David S. Goyer ("Batman Begins," "Man of Steel"), "Da Vinci's Demons," which premieres Friday following the series finale of "Spartacus: War of the Damned," is more than Showtime's "The Borgias" on acid - though it's that, too. A little bit "Sherlock," a little bit "Batman" (but with more nudity than both)
NEWS
March 29, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Prince William isn't just a spoiled royal - he's also a genuine 24-karat golden boy who uses his military training, finely honed instincts, and big chops to save ordinary people in distress. So the prince is portrayed in a new documentary on British TV. Helicopter Rescue follows William, or Flight Lt. Wales as he is known in the Royal Air Force, as he flies daring missions as a member of an RAF search-and-rescue squadron. "There's no greater feeling than when you've actually done some good and saved someone's life," the prince, 30, says on camera.
NEWS
February 26, 2013 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's not every day that members of Temple Emanuel get to see their rabbi dressed as a Major League Baseball player or their cantor as Mr. Incredible from the movie The Incredibles . Yet that's what happened Sunday as the Cherry Hill synagogue hosted a superhero-theme talent show to celebrate Purim, the Jewish holiday that observes the bravery of the people who saved the Jews in the fifth century B.C.E. from Haman, the vindictive prime minister of Persia. Children performed dance routines, put on a puppet show featuring Kermit the Frog, and sang a Taylor Swift song.
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