CollectionsSupervisor
IN THE NEWS

Supervisor

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 1, 1989 | By Catherine Ross, Special to The Inquirer
At a special meeting last week, the Edgewater Park Township Committee voted to hire Tim Cooper, a township resident, to fill the vacant position of Public Works Department supervisor. "We're comfortable that he has the personality and the ability to make a difference in the department," said Paul Guidry, the township's administrator. "We're very positive that there will be improvements. " The $25,000-a-year position was left vacant after John Shedosky, the last superintendent, retired in 1984.
NEWS
May 22, 1988 | By Gail Krueger-Nicholson, Special to The Inquirer
George Martin Cloud will be making a return appearance as a supervisor of East Marlborough Township. On Monday, the board unanimously voted to appoint Cloud to fill the unexpired term of John Hufford, a 13-year veteran of the board who died last month. Cloud had been a supervisor for 27 years but did not run for re- election in 1987 and has been off the board since January. "I believe he was first elected to the supervisors when Eisenhower was elected president. And he had been appointed to serve on the board about 18 months before that," township manager Jane Laslo said.
NEWS
January 15, 1992 | By Pam Belluck, Inquirer Staff Writer
A supervisor at the Embreeville Center for the mentally retarded, who last year received a five-day suspension after a state investigation into neglect and abuse of the retarded, was cleared by the state yesterday. After the state action, a union official who represented the Embreeville employee said the state probe had been a political show. "It's now perfectly clear that the state was politically motivated in disciplining our member," said Paul Gottlieb, business agent for the Pennsylvania Social Services Union.
NEWS
March 28, 1991 | By Stella M. Eisele, Special to The Inquirer
Herman John, who two years ago lost a write-in campaign to win re-election to the Schuylkill Township Board of Supervisors, is back on the ballot. "I am running because the only announced candidate is G. Edward Heit," John, 68, said Tuesday in an interview. Heit, 60, is finishing his first six-year term as a supervisor and is the only other candidate for the single opening. Both men are Republicans, but John's position hurt him last week when it was time for the township's eight GOP committee members to make their endorsements.
NEWS
May 15, 1997 | By Chris Seper, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As she has done several times before, Eileen Lemma is running alone. The Republican supervisor will seek reelection without the backing of the local Republican Party. The party, which has never endorsed Lemma in various runs for supervisor, instead picked elected auditor Keith Froggatt and incumbent Darwin Dobson for nomination to run for this year's two open seats. Political newcomer Jerry Petrowski also is running for the nomination. "I don't know why anybody voted the way they did," said Fred Koelble, president of the Upper Southampton Republican Club.
NEWS
September 29, 1992 | By James Cordrey, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A Philadelphia man was sentenced yesterday to 11 1/2 to 23 months in Delaware County Prison for sexually assaulting a 24-year-old Drexel Hill woman at a department store in January. Donald Ranson, 48, of the 700 block of North 46th Street, pleaded guilty in Delaware County Court to assaulting the woman in a fitting room at Macy's in Springfield Mall. Ranson was a store supervisor. The attack occurred before the store opened on a Saturday. Ranson approached the woman, who worked as a housekeeper, in the fitting room and asked her to have sex with him. When she refused, Ranson tried to force himself on her; she broke free and ran. Later, he told her that he would try again and threatened to use a gun if she did not remain quiet.
NEWS
September 13, 1990 | By Joy D. Gasta, Special to The Inquirer
In the former barn in Doe Run that serves as township garage and meeting room, Landis Hess made the usual pot of coffee before Tuesday night's supervisors meeting. Then he took his seat. But for the first time since 1946, Hess - who resigned last month as West Marlborough supervisor - sat in the audience, not with the board. He was surrounded by an unusually large number of people, listening as township business proceeded for about half an hour. Then Chairman Charles Brosius said the time had come to honor the township's longest-serving supervisor.
NEWS
September 15, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Norman E. Simpson, 80, of Tacony, a cemetery supervisor and an active supporter of Livengrin Foundation for Addiction Recovery, died of kidney failure Thursday at Aria Health-Frankford Campus. In 1976, after his wife and children confronted him about his alcoholism, Mr. Simpson became a patient at Livengrin's inpatient program in Bensalem. "He was a wonderful man, but he had a serious addiction. It was ruining his life," said his wife, Dorothy Alley Simpson. Mr. Simpson and his wife were so grateful to Livengrin for his successful treatment and the counseling it offered their family that they became Livengrin volunteers, answering phones, working with families, and even parking cars, his wife said.
NEWS
June 4, 2008 | By Nancy Petersen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Barry DiLibero never expected that the wedding knot he tied in 1996 was going to cause him a knotty political problem - especially given the marriage has been going swimmingly. In 1999, he and his wife, Theresa, bought a house in West Vincent Township, opened a tag-and-title business on the first floor, and frequently stayed overnight on the second floor. Last year DiLibero, who also operates a hot-air-balloon business, decided to run for township supervisor. After spending the princely sum of $151 on his campaign, he was declared the winner, defeating incumbent Clare Quinn by 26 votes.
NEWS
November 18, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stephen Cianchetti, 58, of Gloucester City, supervisor of public works there, died of complications from cancer Tuesday, Nov. 12, at Cooper University Hospital in Camden. Mr. Cianchetti, known as "Spags," helped develop a shared-services agreement with Audubon, Bellmawr, Brooklawn, Collingswood, and Mount Ephraim that became official in 2010, Gloucester City administrator Jack Lipsett said. Prior to that, Lipsett said, the communities would informally help one another. "For instance," Lipsett said, "Bellmawr doesn't have a bucket truck which hangs banners and things, and we would share our vehicle.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 1, 2016 | By Ronnie Polaneczky
I've got my fingers crossed so tightly for Roger Vanderklok, I think I've busted some knuckles. That's how much I want his lawsuit against the Transportation Security Administration to go to trial already. I have no doubt a jury would hand Vanderklok some long-overdue justice. As a happy consequence, a ruling in Vanderklok's favor could change the way travelers experience airport-security screening. I'll get to that in a sec. But first, let me refresh your memory about Vanderklok's saga, which I detailed in a column last year . On Jan. 26, 2013, Vanderklok, now 60, a Philly architect and avid runner, went through the security screening area of Terminal B at Philly International Airport.
NEWS
June 23, 2016 | By Michael Boren, Staff Writer
Employers cannot discriminate or terminate workers for going through a divorce or separation, the New Jersey Supreme Court said in a ruling Tuesday. The decision stemmed from a case in which an employee of the Millville Rescue Squad in Cumberland County said he was fired in 2006 after telling a supervisor he was divorcing his wife - who also worked there - and having an affair with another coworker. Mario A. Iavicoli, who represented the former employee, Robert Smith, said Tuesday that the ruling was critical for the broader workforce in New Jersey.
NEWS
May 19, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Alice Cleveland Halsema, 94, a former Wallace Township, Chester County, supervisor and an early radio-station engineer, died Sunday, May 1, of Alzheimer's disease at the Neighborhood Hospice in West Chester. She was born in Philadelphia to Margaret and Eben Stevens Cleveland during the time her father, a textile manufacturer, was enrolled at the Philadelphia Textile School. Mrs. Halsema grew up in Webster, Mass., but returned to the Philadelphia area in 1938 when her father took a job at the family's textile mill in Manayunk.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2016
DEAR ABBY: I have been in a relationship with my high school sweetheart for six years. He is only the second person I have been intimate with. I love him and am pretty sure that we will end up marrying. Neither of us has ever cheated. The problem is that I'm having doubts about my lack of experience with other men. I'm not saying I want to sleep around with random men, but I would like to experience intimacy with someone else so I won't wonder "what if" when I am older and married.
NEWS
May 5, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Shirley Earl Hattrick had good timing during her life. After Ancora Psychiatric Hospital opened in 1955 in Winslow Township, Mrs. Hattrick and her husband, John, found a newspaper ad offering work there. In March 1956, she became an Ancora nurse and he became an Ancora maintenance man, working with plumbing and steam fitting. "It gave them an opportunity to have a single-family home on the grounds; it was an upgrade," daughter Linda Giuliano said. And the couple were at an earlier workplace at the same time when they first met. On Thursday, April 28, Mrs. Hattrick, 88, of Cedar Brook, a former night nursing supervisor at Kennedy University Hospital in Stratford, died of a cerebral hemorrhage in the long-term care unit at the Voorhees Center of Genesis Health Care.
NEWS
April 23, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
William M. Danson Jr. "hung out at Shibe Park a lot" when he was growing up, his wife, Edith, said. Living in the Paradise neighborhood, near 26th Street and Lehigh Avenue, before Shibe became Connie Mack Stadium in 1953, Mr. Danson and friends were always on the lookout for a free ticket from a fan. Besides, his wife said, "he passed Shibe Park every single day" at 21st and Lehigh, walking to classes at Northeast High School when it was at...
NEWS
March 26, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
The prosecution in the trial of a SEPTA police officer accused of roughing up a nurse who had wanted to submit a complaint against him ended its case Thursday with testimony from a police supervisor that both helped and hurt the accused. SEPTA Police Lt. Garrett Marsh told a Philadelphia Common Pleas Court jury that he saw Officer Douglas Ioven struggling to control a handcuffed woman during the Christmas morning incident at Suburban Station in 2013. "When I went down the hallway, I saw the officer struggling with a black female," Marsh said.
NEWS
February 12, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Elizabeth McCann Rapanaro, 85, of Gloucester City, a former supervisor for a housing complex, died of cancer Friday, Feb. 5, at home. From the mid-1950s until she retired in the late 1990s, Mrs. Rapanaro was the office manager for Bellmawr Park Mutual Housing Corp., a private property management firm. The 500 units in Bellmawr Park were built for families of moderate-income defense workers by the federal government and purchased in 1953 by the housing corporation, according to information on the Internet.
NEWS
January 7, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Francis J. McHale didn't just spend his Peco career up an electric pole or supervising those who did. From the 1980s into the 2000s, he was one of the organizers of the Sauerkraut Supper, which drew current and retired Peco linemen every October to the Columbia Social Club in Port Richmond. It was a pork-and-sauerkraut dinner, and it benefited St. Christopher's Hospital for Children, said Mike Andrews, a Peco lineman who worked with Mr. McHale for 20 years. Over the years, Andrews said, "he was involved with a lot of charity work.
NEWS
October 19, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
While David C. Doughty Sr. was a special-education supervisor for Camden City public schools in 1966, he led worship services for a few months at a Presbyterian church in Brick Township. He would take along his 10-year-old son, David, to play the piano before and after his preaching. "I would learn one new hymn out of the hymnbook each week," Mr. Doughty's son said. "He would preach and I'd play two old ones and one new one. " It was a form of musical homework for the son, an exercise in continuing education for the father, and a way to keep in touch with his ministerial roots.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|