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Supervisor

NEWS
December 10, 1997 | By Bill Price, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
James F. Tully, 75, of Middletown Township, a retired drafting supervisor for General Electric Co. who was active in his church, died of lung cancer Saturday at the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center. Mr. Tully retired from GE in 1985 after 44 years of service. He then started a second career selling real estate for Century 21 Preferred Agency until several years ago. Mr. Tully lived in Middletown for 37 years and was a member of St. Francis de Sales Church in Lenni, where he served on numerous church committees, including the Parish Action and Citizens for Educational Freedom committees; was co-chairman for parish dances; taught Confraternity of Christian Doctrine classes; served as a Eucharistic minister; and compiled and edited the church's 100th anniversary yearbook in 1994.
NEWS
November 17, 2012 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sidney H. Lehmann, 67, of Lower Makefield, a labor attorney and former township supervisor, died Thursday, Nov. 15, of cancer. Mr. Lehmann successfully argued several significant labor cases before the New Jersey Supreme Court. He also taught courses at Rutgers University's Graduate School of Management and Labor Relations. Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., and raised in Vineland, N.J., Mr. Lehmann graduated from Rutgers University and earned a law degree from Columbia University. In 1974, Mr. Lehmann became a founding attorney of the newly created New Jersey Department of the Public Advocate.
NEWS
January 17, 2001 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Seanie R. Roanoke, a retired supervisor for the Philadelphia public schools, died Jan. 8. She lived in Mount Airy. Her age was not disclosed. Roanoke was employed by the School District for more than 25 years. She first worked as an attendance officer and then supervisor of attendance officers in districts 5 and 7. When she retired in 1985, she was supervisor of public school community coordinators. "She gave me 48 years of a good life," said her husband, John Roanoke. "She was a good mother and she was active in her professional organizations.
NEWS
August 9, 1988 | By Donna St. George, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mary Helen King, 57, a city recreation supervisor remembered for trying to make a difference in the neighborhoods she served, died Friday at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. She lived in Chestnut Hill. In a city career of 28 years, Miss King's last position took her to the north-central section, where she oversaw 17 recreational facilities and tried to involve a diverse, largely depressed neighborhood. "Most people would say you can't do a thing in this district, but not Mary," said Lorraine Poole, a longtime friend and colleague.
NEWS
March 31, 2003 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
W. Richard Whitlock Jr., 66, of South Coventry, a retired Coatesville High School teacher and chairman of the South Coventry Township Board of Supervisors, died of pancreatic cancer Friday at home. Thirty-eight years ago, Mr. Whitlock bought a small farm in the township. He told a reporter in 1996 that he had been looking for a home in a quiet community. By the early 1970s, he had decided to get involved in township government in an attempt to preserve South Coventry's rural character and sense of community.
NEWS
August 21, 1987 | By Robin Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
A former supervisor in the city Streets Department testified yesterday in Municipal Court that he was sworn at, spat on and "sucker-punched" by the leader of a Center City cleaning crew after demanding a day's work for a day's pay. George White, the ex-supervisor, also testified that his attempts to discipline crew leader Keith Gayle "were all squashed" by Streets Department higher-ups bowing to union pressure. Gayle, a union official and close associate of union leader Earl Stout, is one of eight sanitation workers undergoing a preliminary hearing on charges of theft of services for allegedly failing to do their jobs while collecting city paychecks.
NEWS
August 28, 1991 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Colonial Washington Robinson Sr., whose granite pride and decency were the bedrock upon which the next two generations built lives, died Sunday. He was 78 and lived in West Philadelphia. Robinson retired in 1977 as a supervisor of mechanics in the city's Streets Department. He could have wound up his days changing tires in Capeville, Va., but he wanted more. He graduated with a mechanic's certificate from Hampton Institute, but there wasn't much work for whites in 1937 Virginia and almost none at all for blacks.
NEWS
March 1, 1990 | By Peter J. Shelly, Special to The Inquirer
After apologizing for his appearance and thanking his fellow board members for their vote of confidence, John P. Cataldo Sr. took his chair as the fifth Warminster Township supervisor at precisely 7:53 p.m. Tuesday night. Cataldo, who has been involved in the township as either an elected official or volunteer for more than 30 years, was chosen to fill the seat of Thomas Lisowski, who resigned last month. After a 4-0 vote from the board and a round of applause from the audience of about 75 people, Cataldo then proceeded to announce that he was a member of a political party that few people know.
SPORTS
October 19, 1988 | The Inquirer Staff
The supervisor of the officials responsible for a crucial fourth-quarter call in the Miami-Notre Dame game said he didn't believe a report quoting an official as saying his crew mistakenly awarded the ball to the Fighting Irish on downs. The Miami News quoted an official who worked the game as saying the crew had a bad day and was wrong on the key ruling that cost the top-ranked Hurricanes a possible touchdown in their 31-30 loss Saturday. The News did not name the official. "I don't believe a word of it," said Art Hyland, supervisor of the Collegiate Independents Football Officials Association.
NEWS
March 14, 1997 | By Bridget Eklund, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After weeks of facing allegations of misconduct, the former supervisor of the Southeast Delco Police Department resigned yesterday during a meeting with school administrators. Raymond M. Lare, an 18-year veteran of the school district police force, said after the hearing that he resigned to avoid costly litigation. Lare, 38, who was accused of using district gasoline in his personal car and swapping shifts with other officers, remained critical of the administration's case against him. Superintendent Eugene P. DePaul could not be reached for comment yesterday.
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