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Supper

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NEWS
October 31, 1993 | By Tia Swanson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
OK, hold onto your seats. Or, better yet, get ahold of a seat. Beverly Sills is coming to dinner. Sills, the longtime diva who is general director of the New York City Opera, will be here Wednesday to launch Cherry Hill's latest cultural event. She'll be the first speaker for the Star Forum, a subscription-only series that will also feature New York Gov. Mario Cuomo and, later in the season, the Capitol Steps. But first things first. Like dinner. Before Sills takes the stage, she'll be sitting down to supper with Bette and Bill Tomar of Cherry Hill.
NEWS
November 21, 1988 | By Susan Levine, Inquirer Staff Writer
Church suppers come and church suppers go. But then, about this time every fall, the folks at Bradford's United Church of Christ again put on their spread, and the hard truth is, a body would have to look far and wide for any real competition. Part of the draw is the size of the supper here, which feeds 1,000 hungry pilgrims and turns away at least half that number. Something also has to be said for the dollars earned. The amount has grown sizable enough in the last three decades that the faithful have refurbished a good bit of the church with the proceeds.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2015 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Every immigrant's story begins with a journey. Some escape from harsh regimes; some leave for education or employment opportunities; others simply seek the promise of a new life in a new land. Silvana Cardell's Supper, People on the Move pays homage to these stories in a harrowing, captivating dance-theater piece. Filled with symbolism and metaphor, it forcefully conveys the emotional power of the psychological and physical perils that can plague an immigrant's passage. Supper , performed through last weekend at Crane Arts' Icebox space, opens on six performers seated at set of long folding tables, their hands and arms linked, then broken apart in waves, a series of slow gestures that embody the longing of farewell.
FOOD
April 29, 2010 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
So our supper begins. It hasn't begun so humbly in days, various feasts and celebrations having spirited us to finer tables, in one case concluding in the take-home gift of a hollow dark-chocolate pig commemorating the birthday of a friend born in the Year of the Pig. One sprawling dinner in an Old City bistro included a passed hors d'oeuvre of tiny potato blinis topped with a bud of house-cured salmon, exquisite and sweet. Another, in a cozy townhouse dining room, was an homage to spring foraging - a mince of wild ramps beneath the pecorino in tender ravioli; and baby fava beans slick beside spongy morels in the rabbit dish.
FOOD
June 25, 2009 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
If you're trying to signal, as chef-owner Mitch Prensky currently is, that your sophisticated, "urban farmhouse" of a restaurant - Supper, by name - is tweaking its menu, tilting more toward farmhouse and less toward urban, what might be a good visual to start? Well, the deviled egg (albeit with a hit of wasabi or touch of chevre) might fill the bill: "Nobody," Prensky says, "doesn't like a deviled egg. " So it has come to pass that not only is Supper going to offer one starting next Wednesday at happy hour (5 to 8 p.m.)
SPORTS
February 7, 1993 | By Michael Bamberger, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John Henry Boose came up from Meridian, Miss., on Independence Day 1951 and brought to this semi-rural flatland near Vineland the manners and traditions of the South that he knew. He refers to relatives as kindreds, lunch as dinner and dinner as supper. For breakfast most mornings he has fried fish, fish he has caught himself. His supper goes according to the seasons. It could be catfish, bluefish, flounder, deer, raccoon, rabbit, pheasant, possum, waterfowl or squirrel. It is never spaghetti.
NEWS
December 9, 2007 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
Supper, of course, is not quite what it used to be, which tended to be - within memory of your average baby boomer - home-cooked (for better or worse), severely limited in imagination (meat-and-potatoes wasn't just an expression), and eaten around a sturdy table. No use to bore you with the usual suspects that took it out - the Swanson TV dinner, longer workdays, golden arches, home-replacement meals. You know the list. Still there remains a vestigial hunger for the archetypal "supper," even if you never regularly had it; maybe especially if you never regularly had it. And more than a few restaurateurs have endeavored to offer echoes of those meals, real or imagined.
NEWS
August 7, 1994 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Moo goo gai pan, sesame chicken, gong bao, egg rolls. Not your typical church supper. But for the members of the Temple Lutheran Church in Havertown, it was just the right kind of meal to go along with fellowship on a humid, rainy summer evening. For some area churches and synagogues, the lazy, hazy days of summer may mean a drop in attendance. To stir up interest and entice members to come back to the fold, even when the temperature is rising and the ocean breezes are beckoning, many religious institutions do things a little differently in the summertime.
NEWS
July 1, 2015
A review Tuesday of Supper, People on the Move misidentified a performer. Adrian Plascencia was the dancer pursuing a visa application. A photograph accompanying a review Tuesday of Turbine was taken by Sharon Torello.
NEWS
January 28, 2000 | PHOTO CAPTION ASSOCIATED PRESS
Hot! Hot! Hot! there's more to running for president then just debating policy - you even have to do some very silly things. In the first installment of our weekly series, we find Al "What's it going to take to make me an Alpha Male?" Gore contributing to an Iowa potluck supper.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
January 22, 2016 | By Rick Nichols, For The Inquirer
Later, there will be tale-telling. The time the mosquito got trapped in the car on the way back from the Shore, feasting on the kids who were pinned down by the luggage stacked on their laps. And the time one son-in-law's eyes turned yellow, the first sign of a failing liver. And on and on around the table - nine feet long (with the card table appended). This is the almost-closing act of one more Sunday supper in the Fishtown dining room of Michael DiBerardinis, a ritual stretching back now more than 20 years.
NEWS
October 30, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
A MIRACLE came to Dickinson Street on Wednesday night, thanks in part to Leonardo da Vinci. A 3-year-old boy named Reginald took a tumble from a second-story rowhouse window and was saved by his grandmother's framed print of the Renaissance painter's "The Last Supper. " "I call him my miracle baby," the boy's mother, who spoke with the Daily News on the condition of anonymity, said last night. "I'm just happy, grateful that he's still here. " Just before 6:30 p.m., the young mom was getting Reginald, her only child, ready for his nightly bath.
NEWS
July 1, 2015
A review Tuesday of Supper, People on the Move misidentified a performer. Adrian Plascencia was the dancer pursuing a visa application. A photograph accompanying a review Tuesday of Turbine was taken by Sharon Torello.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2015 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Every immigrant's story begins with a journey. Some escape from harsh regimes; some leave for education or employment opportunities; others simply seek the promise of a new life in a new land. Silvana Cardell's Supper, People on the Move pays homage to these stories in a harrowing, captivating dance-theater piece. Filled with symbolism and metaphor, it forcefully conveys the emotional power of the psychological and physical perils that can plague an immigrant's passage. Supper , performed through last weekend at Crane Arts' Icebox space, opens on six performers seated at set of long folding tables, their hands and arms linked, then broken apart in waves, a series of slow gestures that embody the longing of farewell.
NEWS
April 8, 2015
ISSUE | HOLY IMAGES Last Supper cartoon leaves a bad taste Shame on The Inquirer for the Signe Wilkinson cartoon it printed on one of Christianity's holiest days (April 2). To use the Last Supper to make a political point on Holy Thursday was tasteless and insulting. Strange that it appeared the same day as the "Inviting bigotry" editorial. |Annemarie Jannotta, Holland ISSUE | SCHOOL MUSIC Skillful measures As an early-childhood music educator at Rosemont School of the Holy Child, I agree wholeheartedly that musical training at a young age enhances brain development and creates a positive impact on lifelong learning ("Tuning up the wiring in young brains," March 30)
NEWS
September 27, 2013 | By Molly Eichel
PHILLY'S OWN Jill Scott likes not being Jill Scott, if only for a little while. She hits the big screen tomorrow in "Baggage Claim," playing Gail, the cheeky best friend to Paula Patton 's lovelorn flight attendant who doesn't realize that love might not require a boarding pass. Saucy Gail is quite different from songstress Scott or even the Jill Scott who has inhabited other roles, like Precious in "The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency" or Sheila in "Why Did I Get Married?"
FOOD
August 9, 2013 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
From the byways to the beach, almost any summer meal is better out of a basket. A picnic repast can be as elegant as an orchestra concert under the stars, as simple as a seaside sunset, or both. All it takes is a little planning to fine-dine in your bathing suit. One of my favorite alfresco meals is a store-bought veggie hoagie with eggplant, sharp cheese, broccoli rabe, and roasted long hot peppers, served with a bag of chips and a beer. It's delicious, can be eaten with no plate, and holds up for several hours even in warm weather - considerations that guide me in planning home-cooked menus for meals away from home.
FOOD
July 26, 2013 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
Aimee Olexy has built off the rustic elegance of Talula's Table and Talula's Garden with a cafe/market/"supper club" called Talula's Daily , which opened this week adjacent to Talula's Garden on the ground floor of the Ayer building at 210 W. Washington Square (215-592-7787). Olexy, partnering again with Stephen Starr and working with Richard Stokes Architecture, fashioned an industrial-meets-country charmer designed to serve many purposes: Local grocery with milk and yogurt brought in from Lancaster County, healthful-prepared-foods shop (kitchen and refrigerator cases)
FOOD
May 17, 2013 | By Tenaya Darlington, For The Inquirer
To me, May will always be goat cheese weather. Walk into any cheese shop, and it's a petting zoo of pretty goodies: goat cheeses wrapped in leaves, rolled in flowers, molded into balls and bells. It's worth a stroll through Reading Terminal Market or your favorite cheese shop just to check out the Loire Valley bling - the most-prized French goat cheeses appear in spring, just after new pastures have been grazed. One of the best ways to celebrate this bounty is to assemble a seasonal goat cheese board.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2013 | By David Iams, For The Inquirer
While Pook and Pook's sale Saturday of fine art and accessories at its Downingtown gallery offers extraordinary area antiques, notably a circa-1750 Delaware Queen Anne tall case clock, its 500 lots also offer vivid items in other fields, such as a delightful piece of illustration art depicting a Gold Rush bonanza scene and a 19-scene, 380-figure folk art diorama of national and religious icons. The 19-by-26-inch oil on canvas by Tom Lovell (1909 to 1997), best known for his illustrations of the Old West and the Marine Corps in World War II, is expected to bring $10,000 to $15,000, according to the auction catalog, accessible at www.pookandpook.com . In the oil, a prospector who clearly has just hit pay dirt is whooping up his discovery loudly enough to draw the attention of others in the mining camp, including one who is rushing to the scene from the camp's barbershop, still lathered up. The folk art diorama, titled National Clock Millersburg and expected to bring $20,000 to $40,000, is more difficult to explain.
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