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Supplemental Security Income

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NEWS
December 26, 1991 | BY EDWARD J. HUDAK
With the end of the year rapidly approaching, Americans are starting to think about filing their federal income tax. People with disabilities who are employed while receiving disability benefits under Social Security's work incentive rules are no different. They too are subject to payroll withholding for FICA, as well as federal and state income taxes, and therefore must file income taxes. With Social Security reducing one's benefits $1 for every $2 of gross income and the Internal Revenue Service taking its portion of one's paycheck, the worker with a disability can be left with 42.5 percent out of each dollar earned.
NEWS
January 26, 2010
WE CAN'T FAULT Gov. Rendell for leading the trip that rescued 53 orphans from a Haitian orphanage last week and brought them to Pennsylvania. We understand how gratified he was that his "clout" as governor was able to cut through a pile of red tape. Too bad his clout wasn't enough to better help the 340,000 disabled Pennsylvanians - among them, 67,000 children - who live in miserable poverty right here. Advocates for the elderly and disabled in Pennsylvania only recently learned that Pennsylvania's budget - finally passed in October, four months late - was balanced in part by reducing already-small supplementary payments to the commonwealth's poor and disabled citizens.
NEWS
June 10, 1997
Last year, Congress ripped up the safety net for legal immigrants to the United States. This played to ill-informed public resentment of immigrants, and it made "welfare reform" look like a big money-saver. Fortunately, even as President Clinton was letting a bad welfare bill become law, he made clear his determination to restore some benefits to needy non-citizens. This spring's budget deal upheld that goal. But Republicans on the House Ways and Means Committee have produced a bill that doesn't deliver what Newt Gingrich promised.
NEWS
August 23, 1997
Vacationing on Martha's Vineyard, President Clinton has time to relax and to celebrate his administration's accomplishments: UPS trucks rolling again. Welfare roles shrinking. The economy booming. Budget balanced. And thousands of poor, sick children are losing the benefits that keep many of them out of institutions by enabling their parents to care for them at home. That last is no accomplishment - it's a disgrace. But the administration appears committed to a cruel and wrong-headed policy that oversteps the changes Congress intended last year when it tightened eligibility for Supplemental Security Income disability payments to children.
NEWS
August 15, 1992 | by Kathy Sheehan, Daily News Staff Writer
If there haven't been more municipal union press conferences this summer than negotiation sessions, it's getting close. While talks between the city and its unions remain stalemated, District Council 47 yesterday held its second press conference in a week to outline how and where the city could find money for a new labor contract. Thomas Paine Cronin, president of the union representing 3,000 white-collar workers, says the city could pick up about $10 million by helping state officials transfer disabled welfare recipients onto federal assistance roles.
NEWS
March 1, 1992 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Social Security officials and attorneys for the disabled are looking for 15,505 people in Pennsylvania and Delaware who may be eligible to reapply for benefits they were unfairly denied a decade ago. Each person could be entitled to $40,000 to $150,000. All stand to gain from the settlement reached in July in a 1983 federal class-action suit, Bailey v. Sullivan, said Peter B. Macky, attorney for Susquehanna Legal Services, the central Pennsylvania group that sued on behalf of the disabled.
NEWS
October 17, 1987 | By Gregory Spears and Angelia Herrin, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Responding to a storm of outrage from Capitol Hill, Health and Human Services Secretary Otis R. Bowen yesterday abruptly canceled a policy that reduced welfare payments to elderly and disabled Americans who receive food, shelter, firewood, clothing or other free aid from charitable groups. The policy, which took effect Oct. 1 with no public announcement, would have counted non-cash assistance as income for people seeking or receiving benefits under the Supplemental Security Income (SSI)
NEWS
March 28, 1995 | by Leon Taylor, Daily News Staff Writer The Associated Press contributed to this report
Evelyn Sostre is convinced her daughter, Sarai Ortiz, would never have had the chance to mature into an 11th-grade honor student who wants to be a lawyer without the help of Sarai's $458 monthly Supplemental Security Income check. Born with cerebral palsy, asthma and other afflictions, Sarai, 16, has undergone eight leg operations and numerous hospitalizations, Sostre told a congressional committee yesterday. SSI money has helped buy braces, special shoes and eyeglasses, rent wheelchairs and walkers, provide transportation for Sarai's after-school and weekend activities and cover basic living expenses so Sostre could stay home and care for her daughter.
NEWS
July 9, 1991 | By Gregory Spears, Inquirer Washington Bureau
More than 450,000 children denied Social Security disability benefits in the 1980s will be notified this week that they can have their cases reopened to determine whether the government wrongly blocked them from receiving the benefits. Starting tomorrow, the Social Security Administration will mail notices to 452,000 children or their families who were denied assistance between Jan. 1, 1980, and Feb. 27, 1990, inviting them to apply for a rehearing. An additional 60,000 children who were denied benefits under interim rules in place between Feb. 28, 1990, and Feb. 11, 1991, will automatically have their claims re-examined, the Social Security Administration announced yesterday.
NEWS
February 1, 2010
As of this week, several hundred thousand elderly poor and disabled Pennsylvanians will be nickel-and-dimed to help balance the state's $28 billion budget. That's wrong, and all the more unconscionable given a state budget that benefited fat cats while resorting to an expansion of casino gambling to raise revenue. In reaching their months-late budget deal in October, Harrisburg lawmakers and Gov. Rendell necessarily nipped and tucked state spending in hundreds of other ways.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 18, 2015 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Middle-class parents of children with disabilities: There's a new low-cost, tax-advantaged way to save money on their behalf. Low cost is the key idea here. ABLE accounts serve a purpose similar to the special-needs trusts often set up to help disabled or special-needs children without disqualifying them from government benefits. ABLE accounts don't replace special-needs trusts. They are another option. In December, President Obama signed the Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE)
NEWS
November 6, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
In her coat, Maziah Mills-Sorrells looks like any other 2-year-old, an animated sprite, all bounce and spirit. But when Maziah's mother, Essie Mills, took the child's coat off in front of their apartment the other day, Maziah's left arm dropped lifelessly, her hand scraping the cement porch. Maziah didn't feel it, just as she felt nothing last year when she fell and broke that same arm. Afflicted with a rare condition known as Klumpke's Palsy, Maziah has had a paralyzed arm since she was injured during childbirth.
NEWS
October 17, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON - More than 56 million Americans on Social Security will get raises averaging $19 a month come January, one of the smallest hikes since automatic adjustments for inflation were adopted in 1975, the government announced Tuesday. Much of the 1.7 percent increase in benefits could get wiped out by higher Medicare premiums, which are deducted from Social Security payments. At the same time, about 10 million working people who make more than $110,100 will be hit with a tax increase next year because more of their wages will be subjected to Social Security taxes.
NEWS
September 14, 2012 | By John P. Martin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They don't get defendants like Evelyn Baptiste in federal court every day - or even every year. Baptiste, a Montgomery County resident, was sentenced Thursday to six months' home confinement and five years probation for pocketing $186,000 in Social Security disability benefits she didn't deserve. But it wasn't the crime that made her unique. It was her age: Baptiste is 82. Of the 170,000 defendants sentenced nationwide for federal crimes in a recent two-year span, only a few dozen were over age 80, according to Justice Department data.
NEWS
November 29, 2011 | BY BARBARA LAKER & WENDY RUDERMAN, lakerb@phillynews.com 215-854-5933
LINDA ANN WESTON claims that she doesn't know her birth date, the current year or how to spell "cat. " She thinks that George W. Bush is still president. Yet, Weston is the alleged mastermind of a Social Security and welfare-fraud scam that spans several states and possibly includes dozens of victims. Again and again, for decades, she has duped federal Social Security Administration officials, state welfare employees, police and social workers across the country: *  She had scammed at least $7,500 a month - or roughly $90,000 a year - in Supplemental Security Income on behalf of herself and at least 11 others, including four mentally disabled people that she allegedly imprisoned, with little food and no bathroom, in a dark boiler room in a Tacony apartment building.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2011 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
A perpetual challenge for people with disabilities is finding affordable housing that meets their needs. There just isn't enough. Although he's tried to find current data showing how great the shortage is, Gavin R. Kerr, president and chief executive officer of Philadelphia's Inglis Foundation, hasn't found any. He relies on a 2000 study by the University of Pennsylvania that placed the number of disabled in need of housing in this region at...
NEWS
February 1, 2010
As of this week, several hundred thousand elderly poor and disabled Pennsylvanians will be nickel-and-dimed to help balance the state's $28 billion budget. That's wrong, and all the more unconscionable given a state budget that benefited fat cats while resorting to an expansion of casino gambling to raise revenue. In reaching their months-late budget deal in October, Harrisburg lawmakers and Gov. Rendell necessarily nipped and tucked state spending in hundreds of other ways.
NEWS
January 26, 2010
WE CAN'T FAULT Gov. Rendell for leading the trip that rescued 53 orphans from a Haitian orphanage last week and brought them to Pennsylvania. We understand how gratified he was that his "clout" as governor was able to cut through a pile of red tape. Too bad his clout wasn't enough to better help the 340,000 disabled Pennsylvanians - among them, 67,000 children - who live in miserable poverty right here. Advocates for the elderly and disabled in Pennsylvania only recently learned that Pennsylvania's budget - finally passed in October, four months late - was balanced in part by reducing already-small supplementary payments to the commonwealth's poor and disabled citizens.
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