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NEWS
April 20, 2000 | By Rich Henson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The state Supreme Court has barred a Montgomery County judge from hearing the custody dispute involving a mother who fled the country with her two children and the millionaire father who searched the world to bring them home. The high court issued the order last week in response to a petition filed on behalf of the mother, Ellen Dever, by her attorneys, Richard A. Sprague and William H. Lamb. The justices, who did not state a reason for removing Judge Rhonda Lee Daniele, also barred any other Montgomery County judges from the case.
NEWS
May 16, 2007
Nominating two in each party. Democratic Bucks 47   3,419   10,997   5,130   5,641    Chester 61   1,538   4,707   4,273   3,754    Delaware 95   4,854   13,023   10,581   8,116    Montgomery 51   4,012   11,736   9,612   5,844    Philadelphia 96   58,157   118,865   50,755   89,937    Statewide 75   171,818   337,966   365,525   201,892    ...
NEWS
December 5, 2013
A MASSACHUSETTS law that says that "no person" may enter or remain in the 35-foot buffer zones established outside abortion clinics in the state has set off a controversial legal battle about the proper balance between the rights of speakers and the rights of those who must listen to them. Although several federal courts have upheld the law over the past few years, the Supreme Court has now agreed to review it. The high court should uphold it as well. The petitioners, including a grandmother in her 70s who stands outside abortion clinics hoping to talk to women on their way in, claim that the law is an impermissible infringement on their right to express their opinion.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2009 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Supreme Court yesterday asked the U.S. Solicitor General's office to weigh in on whether a huge lawsuit against the government of Saudi Arabia charging that it was a source of terrorist financing before the 9/11 attacks should move forward. The decision could breathe life into a long-running lawsuit alleging that Saudi government-backed charities financed al Qaeda and other terrorist groups. The Supreme Court is weighing whether to accept an appeal filed by the Cozen O'Connor law firm of a lower court finding that Saudi Arabia could not be sued under U.S. law. The Solicitor General's office functions effectively as the United States' lawyer before the Supreme Court and its views likely will figure prominently in the Supreme Court's deliberations.
NEWS
March 30, 1993 | by Phil Rosenthal, Los Angeles Daily News
More than a week has passed since it was learned there would be an imminent opening on the U.S. Supreme Court, and America's best-known judge has yet to hear from America's best-known saxophone player. "I'm not a confidant of the president, even though I did go to the inauguration," said Joseph A. Wapner, who presides over TV's "The People's Court. " "I don't know him. I've never met him. I don't know how he thinks about the Supreme Court. I'm hopeful about his appointment, but I don't know any more than you. " So, the question begs, why not Wapner?
NEWS
May 4, 1987
While breaches of ethics and conflicts of interest have seemed endemic to the executive and legislative branches of the federal government, the Supreme Court normally manages to steer clear of such tawdry behavior. Its members stay out of the public eye and conduct their deliberations behind closed doors. They go so far as to avoid giving speeches to partisans of one side of an issue that may come before the court. Whatever the justices' politics when they took the bench, whatever their written opinions, the court as institution has managed to retain the image of a neutral island in a partisan sea. That's why it's so hard to absorb how Justice Sandra Day O'Connor could have contemplated giving a special private briefing at the Supreme Court to big donors to the Republican Party.
NEWS
February 2, 2002 | By JACK M. BALKIN
HUMAN CLONING and hate crimes would seem to have little in common. But in a series of shortsighted decisions on the constitutional limits of congressional power, the U.S. Supreme Court has managed to make it harder to ban cloning as well as hate crimes. This will no doubt come as a surprise to opponents of abortion, who oppose cloning on a moral basis and are eager to outlaw it. Since the New Deal, Congress has been free to regulate any activity that had substantial effects on interstate commerce.
NEWS
July 11, 1991 | Charles Fried, From the New York Times
The retirement of Justice Thurgood Marshall and the nomination of U.S. Appeals Judge Clarence Thomas does no more than mark the end of a transition that began with the appointment of Chief Justice Warren Burger in 1969. But we should not for that reason expect a court that is monolithic, predictable and even illiberal - in the historic sense of the word. What can we expect from the next Supreme Court? It is likely that the disputes will center on the structure of government and the limits of its power to control individual and group choice.
SPORTS
June 28, 2009 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
In the legal equivalent of running up the score, the NFL is going to the Supreme Court in search of a bigger victory in an antitrust tussle over team merchandise than it already won from a lower court. The Supreme Court could decide as early as tomorrow whether it will hear the case, which involves American Needle Inc.'s challenge to the league's exclusive contract for selling headwear such as caps and hats with team logos on them. American Needle of Buffalo Grove, Ill., also is urging the high court to review.
NEWS
March 31, 2013 | By Tom Odula, Associated Press
NAIROBI, Kenya - Kenya's Supreme Court on Saturday upheld the election of Uhuru Kenyatta as the country's next president, and the loser accepted that verdict, ending an election season that riveted the nation amid fears of a repeat of the 2007-08 postelection violence. Jubilant Kenyatta supporters flooded the streets of downtown Nairobi, honking horns, blowing plastic noise-makers, and chanting. But supporters of defeated Prime Minister Rail Odinga were angry, and shortly after the verdict, police fired tear gas at them outside the Supreme Court.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 17, 2016 | By Mensah M. Dean, Staff Writer
The Philadelphia School Reform Commission's nearly two-year battle to cancel the city teachers' union contract and impose new work rules to save money was soundly defeated again Monday. The state Supreme Court upheld a lower court decision last January that blocked the five-member commission from forcing terms on the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers. Union leaders called the ruling a rebuke of a power grab, and a spokesman for the commission and Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. said no further legal action would be taken.
NEWS
August 9, 2016 | By John Baer
BOTH MAJOR-PARTY presidential candidates push change. No surprise, since 70 percent of us see the country headed in the wrong direction. So Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump each seek, in the lingo of the day, to be your "change agent. " Which can deliver? It's an important question whether you believe the race already is over, what with Clinton surging ahead of Trump's missteps, or you believe it tightens near the end, as presidential contests tend to do. So let's lift the curtain and see what we can see. How would Trump "Make American Great Again"?
NEWS
August 7, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Supreme Court has rejected Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane's last-minute bid to delay her perjury trial. The decision, delivered in a one-line order Friday, means that jury selection is expected to begin Monday in Norristown. Kane, 50, is charged with perjury, obstruction, official oppression, and other crimes. She has pleaded not guilty. This week she filed an emergency petition to the Supreme Court , requesting that the charges against her be dropped.
NEWS
August 3, 2016 | By Caitlin McCabe, Staff Writer
Pennsylvania's Supreme Court on Monday rejected a bid by two high-ranking GOP lawmakers to intervene in a legal battle over the retirement age of judges. With no explanation, the court denied the motion by Senate President Pro Tempore Joseph Scarnati (R., Jefferson) and Majority Leader Jake Corman (R., Centre). The ruling put the Republican leaders on the sideline of a closely watched battle that has erupted into a forefront issue for some of the state's top officials. At stake is a question to voters on the November ballot that would raise the mandatory retirement age for judges from 70 to 75 - a decision that could alter the partisan makeup of the Keystone State's highest court within the next year.
NEWS
August 3, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
A week before Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane is set to face criminal trial, her lawyers filed an emergency petition with the state Supreme Court on Monday asking that the charges against her be dismissed. The so-called King's Bench motion marked a last-minute attempt to avoid or delay trial for Kane. Jury selection is to begin Monday in Norristown. King's Bench actions, named for the high court in English common law, may be filed only in matters of immediate public importance.
NEWS
August 3, 2016
ISSUE | SUPREME COURT Conduct hearings Senate Republicans have refused to consider the nomination of Judge Merrick Garland to replace deceased Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia until the next president takes office ("Phila. lawyer urges hearings," Sunday). The Constitution is clear about how appointments must be made, and the rules have been followed for more than 200 years. Former federal judge Tim Lewis said he put his ideological differences aside and testified on behalf of conservative Supreme Court nominee Samuel A. Alito Jr. because he was a "good person and a fine judge" and "it was the right thing to do. " That's what is missing in the U.S. government today: the selfless act of doing the right thing for the good of the people.
NEWS
August 1, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
As a former federal judge whose nomination sailed through a politically divided Senate, Tim Lewis has taken up the cause of Supreme Court nominee Merrick Garland with fervor. Lewis, a partner at the Center City law firm of Schnader Harrison Segal & Lewis L.L.P., and a former judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit in Philadelphia, has traveled the country, written op-eds, and testified on Capitol Hill making the argument that the Senate is obligated to hold hearings on Garland's stalled nomination.
NEWS
August 1, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
After eight years of legal maneuvering and appeals, former CBS3 anchor Alycia Lane's negligence lawsuit against CBS for failing to stop former coanchor Larry Mendte from hacking her email and feeding salacious details and photos to gossip columnists was finally set for trial. Oct. 21 was it, "trial date certain" in court parlance. Or, maybe not. Alleging a shadowy conspiracy to replace one judge with another, CBS lawyers have asked the state Supreme Court to put Lane's trial on hold and investigate "unusual and suspicious circumstances" in the Philadelphia court.
NEWS
July 23, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
Samuel Edward Smith was 16 and wanted a car. On May 8, 1996, he got one by murdering his Coatesville neighbor, a retired teacher and Episcopal minister. Smith confessed to hitting David Kenny, 64, with a wrench more than 20 times, which broke his skull, and also cutting his neck with a butcher knife. After two weeks on life support, Kenny died. To avoid the death penalty, the teenager pleaded guilty to first-degree murder and related charges in October 1996. He was sentenced to life in prison.
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