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NEWS
April 20, 2000 | By Rich Henson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The state Supreme Court has barred a Montgomery County judge from hearing the custody dispute involving a mother who fled the country with her two children and the millionaire father who searched the world to bring them home. The high court issued the order last week in response to a petition filed on behalf of the mother, Ellen Dever, by her attorneys, Richard A. Sprague and William H. Lamb. The justices, who did not state a reason for removing Judge Rhonda Lee Daniele, also barred any other Montgomery County judges from the case.
NEWS
May 16, 2007
Nominating two in each party. Democratic Bucks 47   3,419   10,997   5,130   5,641    Chester 61   1,538   4,707   4,273   3,754    Delaware 95   4,854   13,023   10,581   8,116    Montgomery 51   4,012   11,736   9,612   5,844    Philadelphia 96   58,157   118,865   50,755   89,937    Statewide 75   171,818   337,966   365,525   201,892    ...
NEWS
December 5, 2013
A MASSACHUSETTS law that says that "no person" may enter or remain in the 35-foot buffer zones established outside abortion clinics in the state has set off a controversial legal battle about the proper balance between the rights of speakers and the rights of those who must listen to them. Although several federal courts have upheld the law over the past few years, the Supreme Court has now agreed to review it. The high court should uphold it as well. The petitioners, including a grandmother in her 70s who stands outside abortion clinics hoping to talk to women on their way in, claim that the law is an impermissible infringement on their right to express their opinion.
NEWS
March 30, 1993 | by Phil Rosenthal, Los Angeles Daily News
More than a week has passed since it was learned there would be an imminent opening on the U.S. Supreme Court, and America's best-known judge has yet to hear from America's best-known saxophone player. "I'm not a confidant of the president, even though I did go to the inauguration," said Joseph A. Wapner, who presides over TV's "The People's Court. " "I don't know him. I've never met him. I don't know how he thinks about the Supreme Court. I'm hopeful about his appointment, but I don't know any more than you. " So, the question begs, why not Wapner?
BUSINESS
February 24, 2009 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Supreme Court yesterday asked the U.S. Solicitor General's office to weigh in on whether a huge lawsuit against the government of Saudi Arabia charging that it was a source of terrorist financing before the 9/11 attacks should move forward. The decision could breathe life into a long-running lawsuit alleging that Saudi government-backed charities financed al Qaeda and other terrorist groups. The Supreme Court is weighing whether to accept an appeal filed by the Cozen O'Connor law firm of a lower court finding that Saudi Arabia could not be sued under U.S. law. The Solicitor General's office functions effectively as the United States' lawyer before the Supreme Court and its views likely will figure prominently in the Supreme Court's deliberations.
NEWS
May 4, 1987
While breaches of ethics and conflicts of interest have seemed endemic to the executive and legislative branches of the federal government, the Supreme Court normally manages to steer clear of such tawdry behavior. Its members stay out of the public eye and conduct their deliberations behind closed doors. They go so far as to avoid giving speeches to partisans of one side of an issue that may come before the court. Whatever the justices' politics when they took the bench, whatever their written opinions, the court as institution has managed to retain the image of a neutral island in a partisan sea. That's why it's so hard to absorb how Justice Sandra Day O'Connor could have contemplated giving a special private briefing at the Supreme Court to big donors to the Republican Party.
NEWS
February 2, 2002 | By JACK M. BALKIN
HUMAN CLONING and hate crimes would seem to have little in common. But in a series of shortsighted decisions on the constitutional limits of congressional power, the U.S. Supreme Court has managed to make it harder to ban cloning as well as hate crimes. This will no doubt come as a surprise to opponents of abortion, who oppose cloning on a moral basis and are eager to outlaw it. Since the New Deal, Congress has been free to regulate any activity that had substantial effects on interstate commerce.
NEWS
July 11, 1991 | Charles Fried, From the New York Times
The retirement of Justice Thurgood Marshall and the nomination of U.S. Appeals Judge Clarence Thomas does no more than mark the end of a transition that began with the appointment of Chief Justice Warren Burger in 1969. But we should not for that reason expect a court that is monolithic, predictable and even illiberal - in the historic sense of the word. What can we expect from the next Supreme Court? It is likely that the disputes will center on the structure of government and the limits of its power to control individual and group choice.
SPORTS
June 28, 2009 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
In the legal equivalent of running up the score, the NFL is going to the Supreme Court in search of a bigger victory in an antitrust tussle over team merchandise than it already won from a lower court. The Supreme Court could decide as early as tomorrow whether it will hear the case, which involves American Needle Inc.'s challenge to the league's exclusive contract for selling headwear such as caps and hats with team logos on them. American Needle of Buffalo Grove, Ill., also is urging the high court to review.
NEWS
March 31, 2013 | By Tom Odula, Associated Press
NAIROBI, Kenya - Kenya's Supreme Court on Saturday upheld the election of Uhuru Kenyatta as the country's next president, and the loser accepted that verdict, ending an election season that riveted the nation amid fears of a repeat of the 2007-08 postelection violence. Jubilant Kenyatta supporters flooded the streets of downtown Nairobi, honking horns, blowing plastic noise-makers, and chanting. But supporters of defeated Prime Minister Rail Odinga were angry, and shortly after the verdict, police fired tear gas at them outside the Supreme Court.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 18, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - A controversial ballot question about when state judges must retire will appear on the November ballot. For now. The Supreme Court on Friday denied a request to keep alive a challenge to the wording of a referendum to determine how long judges can serve. At issue was a change to the ballot question this past spring by the Republican-controlled legislature. The initial language - which already had been printed on primary ballots - asked voters if they would approve raising the mandatory retirement age for judges from 70 to 75. But weeks before the primary, the legislature moved to change the question language and delay the referendum until November.
NEWS
September 16, 2016
Time is ticking for the state Supreme Court to let a lower panel decide whether voters should be asked to decipher a misleading question on the Nov. 8 ballot that seeks to raise the retirement age for Pennsylvania judges. The Supreme Court deadlocked earlier this month when it tried to decide whether the wording is proper. Since it was unable to reach a decision on the ballot question, which seeks to amend the state Constitution, it should let the matter be decided by the Commonwealth Court.
NEWS
September 15, 2016 | By Kristen A. Graham, Staff Writer
Some Pennsylvania schools have cutting-edge facilities. Others have no textbooks. The state's education-funding system is so fundamentally flawed that a judicial remedy is needed, parents, school districts, and advocacy groups told the state's highest court Tuesday. Leaving school-funding decisions to Pennsylvania's legislature has resulted in gross inequalities, said Brad Elias, a lawyer for the plaintiffs. "This is unconscionable," Elias said. "It's so far out of the range of reasonableness.
NEWS
September 14, 2016
By John G. Malcolm and Tiffany H. Bates Few presidential elections have featured federal court judges among their top five issues. The Supreme Court's odious decision in the Dred Scott case was a central theme in the 1860 race between Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas. And the Warren Court was front and center in the 1968 faceoff between Richard Nixon and Hubert Humphrey. This may well be another such year. Court-related issues far beyond who will fill the vacancy created by the unexpected death of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia loom large.
NEWS
September 14, 2016
By Michele L. Jawando The next president could dramatically change the nature of the U.S. Supreme Court for generations to come. As such, voters who care about the direction of this country must base their vote on the importance of the court when they cast their ballot this November. Being a "Supreme Court voter" is different from being a single-issue voter. So many issues that matter to Americans - immigration reform, health care, voting rights, reproductive rights, campaign-finance reform, and core constitutional questions about rights and government power - end up at the court.
NEWS
September 14, 2016 | By Kristen A. Graham, Staff Writer
With trumpets and speeches, a drum line and song, students, teachers, politicians and others rallied Monday for education funding in advance of an important Pennsylvania Supreme Court hearing on the matter. The high court will hear arguments Tuesday in a lawsuit charging that the state has abdicated its responsibility to adequately fund school districts across the commonwealth. Parents, including two from Philadelphia, and districts including the William Penn system in Delaware County sued the state in 2014.
NEWS
September 10, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
New Jersey's Supreme Court said Thursday that it would hear a challenge that will decide whether municipalities now must zone for the affordable housing units they did not zone for between 1999 and 2015. The court announced it had accepted an appeal by the Fair Share Housing Center, an advocacy group that is seeking to overturn a July 12 ruling by the Appellate Division. The three-judge panel ruled unanimously that municipalities have no obligation to zone for units not created during the nearly 16-year "gap period," when the state failed to devise an acceptable formula for calculating each town's obligation.
NEWS
September 9, 2016
The state Supreme Court's inability to decide whether a ballot question on raising the retirement age for Pennsylvania judges is misleading doesn't mean the issue is settled. The Supreme Court deadlocked last week in deciding whether a question on November's ballot to amend the state constitution was improperly worded, so the case should go back to a lower court for review. After all, the Commonwealth Court is where the plaintiffs - who include two former state Supreme Court justices - initially filed their complaint.
NEWS
September 4, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - A deadlock Friday by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court left intact a last-minute legislative change in the wording of a ballot question about when state judges must retire, setting the stage for the question to appear as planned on the November ballot. The high court's 3-3 vote seemed to end the high-profile - and high-stakes - challenge to the measure launched by two former Supreme Court justices and one of the region's prominent lawyers. "It's the correct outcome," said Philadelphia lawyer Matt Haverstick, who represented Senate Republicans.
NEWS
September 2, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
A New Jersey appeals court on Wednesday ruled that government agencies can "neither confirm nor deny" the existence of records in response to requests for information by the public, delivering a blow to citizens and news organizations wary of more secretive government. Indiana is the only state that has enacted a law permitting such a response, according to the decision. However, the so-called Glomar response dates to the 1970s in federal cases, when the CIA fought a request under the Freedom of Information Act, citing national security interests.
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