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NEWS
April 20, 2000 | By Rich Henson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The state Supreme Court has barred a Montgomery County judge from hearing the custody dispute involving a mother who fled the country with her two children and the millionaire father who searched the world to bring them home. The high court issued the order last week in response to a petition filed on behalf of the mother, Ellen Dever, by her attorneys, Richard A. Sprague and William H. Lamb. The justices, who did not state a reason for removing Judge Rhonda Lee Daniele, also barred any other Montgomery County judges from the case.
NEWS
May 16, 2007
Nominating two in each party. Democratic Bucks 47   3,419   10,997   5,130   5,641    Chester 61   1,538   4,707   4,273   3,754    Delaware 95   4,854   13,023   10,581   8,116    Montgomery 51   4,012   11,736   9,612   5,844    Philadelphia 96   58,157   118,865   50,755   89,937    Statewide 75   171,818   337,966   365,525   201,892    ...
NEWS
December 5, 2013
A MASSACHUSETTS law that says that "no person" may enter or remain in the 35-foot buffer zones established outside abortion clinics in the state has set off a controversial legal battle about the proper balance between the rights of speakers and the rights of those who must listen to them. Although several federal courts have upheld the law over the past few years, the Supreme Court has now agreed to review it. The high court should uphold it as well. The petitioners, including a grandmother in her 70s who stands outside abortion clinics hoping to talk to women on their way in, claim that the law is an impermissible infringement on their right to express their opinion.
NEWS
March 30, 1993 | by Phil Rosenthal, Los Angeles Daily News
More than a week has passed since it was learned there would be an imminent opening on the U.S. Supreme Court, and America's best-known judge has yet to hear from America's best-known saxophone player. "I'm not a confidant of the president, even though I did go to the inauguration," said Joseph A. Wapner, who presides over TV's "The People's Court. " "I don't know him. I've never met him. I don't know how he thinks about the Supreme Court. I'm hopeful about his appointment, but I don't know any more than you. " So, the question begs, why not Wapner?
NEWS
May 4, 1987
While breaches of ethics and conflicts of interest have seemed endemic to the executive and legislative branches of the federal government, the Supreme Court normally manages to steer clear of such tawdry behavior. Its members stay out of the public eye and conduct their deliberations behind closed doors. They go so far as to avoid giving speeches to partisans of one side of an issue that may come before the court. Whatever the justices' politics when they took the bench, whatever their written opinions, the court as institution has managed to retain the image of a neutral island in a partisan sea. That's why it's so hard to absorb how Justice Sandra Day O'Connor could have contemplated giving a special private briefing at the Supreme Court to big donors to the Republican Party.
NEWS
February 2, 2002 | By JACK M. BALKIN
HUMAN CLONING and hate crimes would seem to have little in common. But in a series of shortsighted decisions on the constitutional limits of congressional power, the U.S. Supreme Court has managed to make it harder to ban cloning as well as hate crimes. This will no doubt come as a surprise to opponents of abortion, who oppose cloning on a moral basis and are eager to outlaw it. Since the New Deal, Congress has been free to regulate any activity that had substantial effects on interstate commerce.
NEWS
July 11, 1991 | Charles Fried, From the New York Times
The retirement of Justice Thurgood Marshall and the nomination of U.S. Appeals Judge Clarence Thomas does no more than mark the end of a transition that began with the appointment of Chief Justice Warren Burger in 1969. But we should not for that reason expect a court that is monolithic, predictable and even illiberal - in the historic sense of the word. What can we expect from the next Supreme Court? It is likely that the disputes will center on the structure of government and the limits of its power to control individual and group choice.
SPORTS
June 28, 2009 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
In the legal equivalent of running up the score, the NFL is going to the Supreme Court in search of a bigger victory in an antitrust tussle over team merchandise than it already won from a lower court. The Supreme Court could decide as early as tomorrow whether it will hear the case, which involves American Needle Inc.'s challenge to the league's exclusive contract for selling headwear such as caps and hats with team logos on them. American Needle of Buffalo Grove, Ill., also is urging the high court to review.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2009 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Supreme Court yesterday asked the U.S. Solicitor General's office to weigh in on whether a huge lawsuit against the government of Saudi Arabia charging that it was a source of terrorist financing before the 9/11 attacks should move forward. The decision could breathe life into a long-running lawsuit alleging that Saudi government-backed charities financed al Qaeda and other terrorist groups. The Supreme Court is weighing whether to accept an appeal filed by the Cozen O'Connor law firm of a lower court finding that Saudi Arabia could not be sued under U.S. law. The Solicitor General's office functions effectively as the United States' lawyer before the Supreme Court and its views likely will figure prominently in the Supreme Court's deliberations.
NEWS
May 10, 1993
The state Supreme Court is an embarrassment to every Pennsylvanian. The bizarre charges and counter-charges - mostly swirling around Justice Rolf Larsen (who could be the next chief justice!) - have made it a national joke. The investigation under way could help revive the court. You too can help. A vacancy on the court will be filled this year. In the May 18 primary election, nine candidates are running - seven Democrats and two Republicans. If you're a registered Republican, it's a simple one-on-one contest - former Philadelphia District Attorney Ron Castille or Superior Court Judge Zoran Popovich of Lewisburg.
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BUSINESS
July 1, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a ruling with wide implication for utilities and regulated industries, the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday blocked Obama administration rules aimed at reducing pollution from coal-fired power plants, saying regulators failed to take cost into account. The court, in a 5-4 opinion, said the Environmental Protection Agency was obligated under the Clean Air Act to weigh the cost at the outset of efforts to cut emissions of mercury and other pollutants. "The agency must consider cost - including, most importantly, cost of compliance - before deciding whether regulation is appropriate and necessary," the court said in its majority opinion, written by Justice Antonin Scalia.
NEWS
June 29, 2015 | By Christine Flowers
WHEN I WAS 11, the Supreme Court legalized abortion. It jumped into the social battles that had been waging across the country at a slow boil, snatched a constitutional right from the penumbral shadows and gave dignity to the coat hanger. After all, it was this bloody symbol that had been raised to prove that women needed abortions, and when they couldn't get them they'd resort to fatal home remedies. And voila , the issue was finally laid to rest. Now let me dislodge my tongue from my cheek.
NEWS
June 28, 2015 | By Jessica Parks and Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writers
John Speer rested a rainbow flag - the same one Mayor Nutter ordered Friday to fly at City Hall - on one shoulder. Speer, 72, came out in 1976. Before that, he sneaked into gay bars. "I really didn't think I'd live to see this day," said Speer, one of hundreds who convened on Independence Mall to celebrate a Supreme Court decision declaring same-sex marriage a constitutional right. Nutter, less than an hour after his flight from Italy landed in Philadelphia, read from the Declaration of Independence.
NEWS
June 28, 2015 | By Jessica Parks and Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writers
On both sides of the Delaware River, advocates cheered Friday's Supreme Court decision declaring same-sex marriage a constitutional right, while critics voiced concerns about improper judicial activism and restrictions on religious freedom. In Philadelphia, John Speer rested a rainbow flag - the same one Mayor Nutter ordered to fly at City Hall - on one shoulder. Speer, 72, came out in 1976. Before that, he sneaked into gay bars. "I really didn't think I'd live to see this day," said Speer, one of hundreds who convened on Independence Mall to celebrate the ruling.
NEWS
June 27, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Now that the Supreme Court has for the second time declined to dismantle the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, better known as Obamacare, one might begin to get the impression that it is the law of the land - not only because it was duly passed by Congress and signed by the eponymous president, but also by virtue of being a reasonable response to one of the country's most pressing domestic policy problems. Of course, the landmark health-care reform has been all those things for more than five years.
NEWS
June 27, 2015 | By Chris Mondics and Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writers
In its second ruling in three years upholding President Obama's health-care law, the U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday turned back challengers' claims that the law barred health insurance subsidies to millions in 34 states, including Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware. The 6-3 opinion, written by Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., upheld a central pillar of the Affordable Care Act and allows the administration's five-year-old initiative to get health coverage to more Americans. The decision lifted a cloud that threatened to end coverage for millions of Americans, disrupt state insurance markets, and pressure politicians whose constituents receive the subsidies to find a way to save them.
NEWS
June 26, 2015 | BY WENDY RUDERMAN, Daily News Staff Writer rudermw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5924
IN A VICTORY for gun-safety advocates in Philadelphia, the Commonwealth Court of Pennsylvania yesterday overturned a state law that had made it easier for gun owners and the National Rifle Association to sue cities and towns over local gun ordinances. "The Court has preserved the ability of democratically elected local officials throughout this Commonwealth to do what they think is necessary to protect their citizens from the scourge of gun violence," Mayor Nutter said in a statement.
NEWS
June 22, 2015 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. Supreme Court has barely a week left to issue a ruling that could settle the same-sex marriage issue nationwide. But among legal scholars and the public, there's little debate about which way the court will go. "We don't need nine votes. I can count to five, and that's all we need to win," NYU Law professor Kenji Yoshino said at a forum in Center City this month. Yoshino predicted the four liberal justices and Justice Anthony M. Kennedy, considered a swing vote, will declare same-sex marriage a constitutional right and overturn the 13 remaining state bans.
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Resolving questions about when a criminal defendant may withdraw a guilty plea, Pennsylvania's Supreme Court has unanimously reinstated the 30- to 66-year prison term of a Kensington man who admitted raping an 11-year-old girl. The high court ruled, 5-0, on Monday, reversing a Superior Court decision in 2013 that Jose Carrasquillo should be tried because the trial judge wrongly rejected his request to withdraw his guilty plea. "A defendant's innocence claim must be at least plausible to demonstrate, in and of itself, a fair and just reason for presentence withdrawal of a plea," wrote Chief Justice Thomas G. Saylor.
NEWS
June 11, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman and Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Gov. Christie on Tuesday claimed a significant legal victory in a yearlong battle with public-sector unions over pension funding, even as analysts warned that the state's long-term fiscal condition remained precarious. The New Jersey Supreme Court ruled that the state could not grant public workers a legally enforceable contract to greater pension funding, even though Christie signed a 2011 law establishing just that. In a 5-2 decision, the justices said that the state constitution prohibited the governor and the Legislature from establishing such a contract without voter approval, because it would create a long-term debt.
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