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NEWS
December 20, 2003 | By Frederick Cusick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Pennsylvania Supreme Court yesterday upheld a contempt citation issued against two journalists who had refused to provide information during a 2000 murder trial in Philadelphia. In its 5-2 decision, the court approved the contempt citation given to former Inquirer reporter Mark Bowden and Linn Washington Jr. of the Philadelphia Tribune by Common Pleas Court Judge Jane Cutler Greenspan in December 2000. The court also ruled that Greenspan had abused her judicial discretion in imposing fines of $40,000 on each reporter, and ordered her to review the matter.
NEWS
May 15, 1990
Now that Pennsylvania's judicial disciplinary board has voted to recommend a two-month suspension of state Supreme Court Justice Rolf R. Larsen for misconduct, there's a chance that his colleagues on the high court will get to decide his fate. If the matter of his suspension does come before the whole court, the justices should take the next logical step: They should strip Justice Larsen of his judicial robes - for good. Don't bet on them doing it, however. Even though it would be well within their power.
NEWS
May 19, 1987 | By HOWARD SCHNEIDER, Daily News Staff Writer
Former City Councilman Harry P. Jannotti, convicted in the Abscam scandal, has been stricken from today's primary ballot by the state Supreme Court. However, election officials say the decision came too late to prevent voters from casting ballots for Jannotti in some polling places. Following the high court's ruling late yesterday afternoon, election supervisors tried to figure out how to reach the 385 voting machines in the 7th District to lock Jannotti's lever. Voting machine supervisor V. Thomas Mattia said he did not expect to reach all the machines until sometime today.
NEWS
May 19, 1989 | By Aaron Epstein, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Without a public explanation or recorded dissent, the U.S. Supreme Court yesterday permitted a 15-year-old unmarried Florida girl to obtain an abortion without the consent of an adult. The decision, issued after a closed conference of the nine high court members, erased Tuesday's order by Justice Anthony M. Kennedy that had temporarily blocked the abortion of the girl, identified in court records only as T.W. Kennedy had acted at the request of a lawyer appointed to represent the fetus being carried by T.W., who is in her 13th week of pregnancy.
NEWS
October 17, 1989
To those who watch these things closely, our state's Supreme Court may be the extreme embarrassment. The six sitting justices on this seven-member body seem to relish the opportunity to fight with each other over matters like patronage, rather than to work together for matters like justice. Every Pennsylvania voter has a chance - indeed an obligation - to watch closely this fall's campaign for that seventh Supreme Court seat. Your vote could well tip the balance of the court away from today's bickering and back- room brawling.
NEWS
March 29, 1988 | By the Rev. William J. Byron
Given our national penchant of quarter-century recall of newsworthy names, it was no surprise on March 18 to see newspaper commentary on the 25th anniversary of the 1963 U.S. Supreme Court's Gideon decision. An interesting footnote to that case comes from the memory of former Supreme Court Justice Arthur J. Goldberg. In a Law School lecture at The Catholic University of America, Goldberg recently recalled for the student audience the landmark case involving the constitutional rights of Clarence Earl Gideon.
NEWS
May 2, 1989
Last spring, 1.8 million Pennsylvanians went to the polls to nominate candidates for the Supreme Court. Two weeks from now they'll get to do it all over again, as a result of a decision by the high court to cancel last year's judicial elections. Only one Republican is running this time around, Montgomery County Common Pleas Judge Anita B. Brody, the top Republican vote-getter last spring. Three Democrats - two of them contenders from 1988 - are seeking their party's nod. In that primary race, The Inquirer endorses Allegheny County Common Pleas Judge Eunice Ross.
NEWS
March 5, 1987 | By David M. Giles, Inquirer Staff Writer
As Kate Harper left the sturdy marble columns, long maroon drapes and mahogany furnishings of the courtroom of the U.S. Supreme Court building Monday morning, she was surrounded by family and friends. Congratulated with hugs, kisses and plaudits such as "nice job" and "way to go," Harper was wearing a smile. She had just finished a 22-minute argument in front of the nine justices of the Supreme Court. "It was exciting," said Harper, 30, a Lower Gwynedd resident and trial lawyer for the firm of Hamburg, Rubin, Mullin & Maxwell in Lansdale.
NEWS
September 15, 1998 | By Robert Zausner, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
The City of Cincinnati today will take its three-year fight to enact spending limits on municipal election campaigns to the U.S. Supreme Court, asking the court to reconsider its landmark 1976 decision that such restrictions abridge free speech. The case represents the first time since that decision, Buckley v. Valeo, was handed down that the court has been asked to address the constitutionality of limiting how much candidates may spend. A petition, to be filed by the National Voting Rights Institute, the Boston-based nonprofit group serving as co-counsel to Cincinnati, argues that much has changed over the 22 years since the court decided the Buckley case.
NEWS
October 30, 1989 | Daily News Wire Services
The Supreme Court today let stand a landmark ruling that barred as unconstitutional mandatory AIDS testing for employees at state facilities for the mentally retarded. At issue was a requirement by a Nebraska state agency that the 400 workers who have close contact with the residents of such facilities be tested for AIDS and hepatitis B, fatal diseases transmitted through blood and semen. The requirement was adopted in 1987 after an employee died of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome.
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