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NEWS
June 25, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday dashed New Jersey's hopes to institute sports betting at Atlantic City casinos and the state's racetracks by upholding a federal ban that limits the activity to four states and denying the state's appeal of a lower court ruling. Last year, a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit in Philadelphia upheld a trial judge's ruling that sided with the four professional sports leagues - Major League Baseball, the NFL, the NHL, and the NBA, as well as the NCAA - and shot down New Jersey's attempt to overturn the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act (PASPA)
NEWS
June 11, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Pennsylvania has more inmates convicted as juveniles for murder and sentenced to life without parole than any other place in the world. That distinction was reinforced Monday by a U.S. Supreme Court decision. The high court declined to hear an appeal by juvenile-justice advocates to revisit the sentences of those prisoners. "We are obviously disappointed," said Marsha Levick, deputy director and chief counsel of the Juvenile Law Center, a national, nonprofit, public-interest law firm for children, based in Center City.
NEWS
June 9, 2014
With the exception of a slightly sore thumb, Carol Anne Bond's attempt to poison her husband's mistress missed the mark. But the Lansdale microbiologist's potion - mixed from chemicals gleaned from her workplace, at Rohm & Haas, and, alarmingly enough, some browsing on Amazon.com - had an intoxicating effect on the Supreme Court. Not only did Bond v. United States culminate last week in a Supreme Court opinion loaded with unappetizing references to toxic burritos and poisoned fish.
NEWS
June 4, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday threw out the conviction of a Lansdale woman who tried to poison a romantic rival, ruling unanimously that federal prosecutors in Philadelphia overreacted by charging her under antiterrorism law. Though her lawyers called the decision a victory, it came too late for Carol Anne Bond, 42, who served six years in federal prison after pleading guilty to chemical weapons charges in 2007. In an opinion dripping with sarcasm, Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. chided prosecutors in Philadelphia for equating "an amateur attempt by a jilted wife to injure her husband's lover" with an attack prohibited under a 1997 treaty banning chemical weapons.
NEWS
May 18, 2014 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
The state Supreme Court has granted a temporary restraining order that bars the Philadelphia School Reform Commission from taking action against a charter school. It marks the first time the top court has entered the dispute over the powers the commission has to ignore state law in order to protect its finances by managing charter enrollment. On Thursday, the court approved West Philadelphia Achievement Charter Elementary School's request to decide whether the law that led to the state takeover of the district in 2001 permits the SRC to suspend parts of other laws to deal with the district's financial crisis.
NEWS
May 10, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania's Supreme Court agreed Thursday to resolve the contested key legal theory underpinning the landmark 2012 prosecution of the first Catholic Church official charged in the clergy child-sex-abuse scandal. The state's highest court will thus decide the future of Msgr. William J. Lynn, the former Archdiocese of Philadelphia official responsible for investigating and recommending punishment for priests accused of sexual and other misconduct. It could also dictate the standards for prosecutors to bring future charges against any church officials accused of covering up misconduct by clergy they supervise.
NEWS
April 27, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
MEDFORD New Jersey's appeals court has upheld a 2012 Superior Court ruling that dismissed developer Stephen D. Samost's $60 million lawsuit against Medford Township. Samost and one of his firms, Medford Village East Associates, sought the compensation on the ground that the township was obliged to make good on a failed arrangement to redevelop a 280-acre Samost-owned site off Route 70 near Eayrestown Road. First proposed in 1996, the project envisioned a shopping center to be called Medford Crossings and a residential component, Medford Village East, that ultimately called for 750 single-family homes and apartments.
NEWS
April 25, 2014
'Simplistic" is how Justice Sonia Sotomayor described the reasoning of a Supreme Court majority that effectively upheld laws in seven states banning affirmative action by colleges and universities. She's right. The 6-2 decision suggests a nation that no longer needs to directly address the vestiges of past discrimination, which have left minority communities poorer, sicker, and educationally deprived. Beyond that, the ruling suggests the courts need not intervene when a state executes a law that was properly enacted through a viable democratic process.
NEWS
April 16, 2014 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
THE PHILADELPHIA School Partnership and PennCAN, two controversial education-reform groups, want the state's highest court to decide whether the School Reform Commission can impose work-rule changes on teachers. The two pro-school-choice organizations sought the review in an amicus brief filed yesterday with the state Supreme Court. It "is crucial for this Court to fully consider this case and breathe life into the legislative command that the [SRC] is to be empowered with the flexibility to quickly respond in times of budgetary crisis and provide for the long-term sustainability of City public education," the filing read.
NEWS
April 13, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA It's been 18 months since Philadelphia Common Pleas Court Judge Willis W. Berry Jr. retired on the day he was to pay a $180,000 civil fraud judgment involving a property that a jury found he acquired by deceiving a client. Now, that same ethical violation has cost the 71-year-old Berry his license to practice law for the next year. The state Supreme Court on Wednesday approved without comment the suspension recommended in October by its lawyer Disciplinary Board. The board's report called Berry's violation "serious misconduct" that requires suspension to "protect the public and preserve the integrity of the legal profession.
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