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NEWS
March 30, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Until she noticed the tiny blood spots on her sheets, Peg Fagan thought the itchy, raised area on her shoulder was a spider bite. So when her doctor asked during a routine checkup in April whether Fagan had any health concerns, she mentioned the bite. The doctor took a sample to biopsy. A few days later, Fagan got a call saying she had to come in to the office. "I said, 'No, I don't,' " remembered Fagan, 56, a breast cancer survivor. "If you are going to tell me that I have cancer, just tell me. " Fagan had melanoma, the most serious kind of skin cancer.
BUSINESS
March 25, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wal-Mart has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn a December decision by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court to approve a $151 million class-action award to employees in the state for unpaid wages and damages. In 2006, a Philadelphia Common Pleas Court jury awarded Michelle Braun, a former employee, and nearly 188,000 other employees damages after some complained that the retail giant did not pay them when they worked off the clock or while they were supposed to be on breaks. In its March 13 petition to the Supreme Court, Wal-Mart said the trial jury and Pennsylvania court decisions were wrong because the company had been subjected to "trial by formula," with a few plaintiffs' allegations applied to the whole group.
NEWS
March 24, 2015
LAST Wednesday was Scott DiClaudio's lucky day. He won the political equivalent of the Mega Millions lottery. As one of 57 candidates seeking the Democratic nomination to Common Pleas Court, DiClaudio picked the lowest number in the lottery held by state election officials to determine ballot position. He will appear in the No. 1 spot for that job in the May 19 primary, making him a virtual shoo-in to win one of the 12 seats in the court being filled this year. He might as well go get measured for a black robe.
NEWS
March 22, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Until she could buy health insurance on healthcare.gov last year, Gina Connor saw her doctor only when it was "unavoidable. " With most of her income going to caring for her child and paying the mortgage and utility bills, Connor relied on over-the-counter remedies for some five years to see her through. But doctor visits became "unavoidable" for colds and other ailments, Connor had to pay out of pocket. "It was expensive, depending on what was done," said the 38-year-old Upper Darby resident.
NEWS
March 17, 2015
ELECTING JUDGES has been a bad idea for a long time. Now, it is getting to be ridiculous. Voters going to the polls on May 19 to vote for mayor will first have to make their way through a long roster of state and local judicial candidates for everything from the state Supreme Court to Philadelphia's Municipal Court. As of yesterday, there were 10 candidates running for the Democratic nomination for the three state appellate courts - Supreme, Superior and Commonwealth. There were 57 candidates running for the Democratic nomination for 12 vacancies on Common Pleas Court, in Philadelphia, which handles major civil and all felony cases.
NEWS
March 13, 2015 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
THE CURIOUS case of Kathleen Kane took center stage in Philadelphia yesterday. The state Supreme Court heard spirited arguments in a packed City Hall courtroom over whether a grand-jury investigation into Kane, the state's first female attorney general, had unfolded on sound legal ground. If you're new to this mind-boggling story, it goes something like this: * Last fall, Montgomery County Judge William Carpenter appointed a special prosecutor, Thomas Carluccio, to lead a grand-jury investigation into allegations that Kane's office had leaked information to the Daily News about a 2009 grand-jury investigation into former Philadelphia NAACP head J. Whyatt Mondesire.
BUSINESS
March 13, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
A whistle blower's lawsuit against the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission should be reinstated because a judge's dismissal ignored crucial facts, the whistle blower's attorney told the Pennsylvania Supreme Court on Wednesday in Philadelphia. Ralph Bailets, a former financial manager for the commission, says he was fired in November 2008 in retaliation for his complaints about fraud, overcharges, and political cronyism in an $82 million contract for a financial reporting system. Bailets' complaints about the contract with Ciber Inc., a Colorado technology firm, also figured in a grand jury investigation that resulted in criminal charges against eight turnpike officials, employees, and contractors in 2013.
NEWS
March 12, 2015 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - Twelve candidates met the filing deadline Tuesday for a spot on the primary ballot to fill one of three open seats on the Pennsylvania Supreme Court. Six Republicans and six Democrats, including five candidates from the Philadelphia area, filed nominating petitions with the Department of State for a place on the May ballot. All but one currently sit on the bench. "Looking at the 12, there is gender diversity, geographic diversity, party diversity, and some race diversity," said Lynn Marks, executive director of Pennsylvanians for Modern Courts, a statewide court reform group.
NEWS
March 11, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. Supreme Court sided Monday with Amtrak in a dispute with freight railroads over priority of passenger trains on freight tracks. A 2008 law directed Amtrak to work with the Federal Railroad Administration to create standards that let Amtrak keep priority over freight trains. But a federal appeals court sided with the freight railroad industry, which said Amtrak was a private organization that could not regulate competitors' actions. The Supreme Court reversed, saying Amtrak is like a government entity given the reality of federal controls.
NEWS
March 10, 2015 | By Craig R. McCoy and Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Staff Writers
Is Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane trying to put herself beyond the reach of the law? Or is it a special prosecutor who is operating in illegal territory? That's the issue Pennsylvania's Supreme Court will take up Wednesday as it hears oral arguments in Kane's challenge to the special prosecutor who wants her arrested for allegedly violating grand-jury secrecy laws. The five justices - two of the court's seats are currently vacant - will hear from lawyers for Kane and special prosecutor Thomas E. Carluccio in a case crucial to Kane's personal and political future.
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