CollectionsSupreme Court
IN THE NEWS

Supreme Court

NEWS
July 1, 2016 | By Christine Flowers
I VOWED that I would never vote for Donald Trump. I have written, at last count, seven columns explaining why he repulses me. That is still true; his being and character necessitate spiritual Dramamine. He is, to put it simply, the human equivalent of mayonnaise, the single most disgusting substance I have encountered in my 54 years on Earth. And yet, of course, the rest of this column will be devoted to why, barring some deus ex machina named Paul Ryan, I will vote for him in November.
NEWS
June 29, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
In a big win for abortion-rights advocates, the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday struck down a Texas abortion law that required clinics to meet hospital-like surgical standards and doctors to get admitting privileges at a local hospital. The 5-3 ruling was the most significant since Planned Parenthood v. Casey in 1992, which set the precedent that states could impose abortion restrictions as long as they did not create an "undue burden" on women seeking abortions. An undue burden existed if a restriction's "purpose or effect is to place substantial obstacles" in the path of women who want an abortion, including "unnecessary health regulations.
NEWS
June 29, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday vacated the bribery conviction of former Virginia Gov. Robert McDonnell with a ruling likely to reverberate through other high-profile corruption cases, including those against former U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah (D., Pa.) and U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez (D., N.J.) Within minutes of the unanimous opinion's release, lawyers for Fattah - who was convicted last week on federal charges of racketeering, bribery, and fraud, and then resigned from Congress - were scouring the decision, which narrowed the scope of a law that bars public officials from taking gifts in exchange for official actions.
NEWS
June 29, 2016 | By Ronnie Polaneczky
IF YOU WANT to read brainy prose about Monday's landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision regarding abortion restrictions in Texas, you should totally check out the opinion that Justice Stephen Breyer penned for the court. Pour yourself some tea, lift it with a raised pinkie, and savor Breyer's facility with the English language. I'm telling you, the man has a way with words. But if you're squeezed for time, let me sum up for you the court's opinion in one sentence: "Don't make s--- up and expect us to buy it. " Hence, the court gutted the Texas bill called H.B. 2, which, in the guise of protecting a woman's health, instead impinged on her right to have an abortion.
NEWS
June 29, 2016 | By Tommy Rowan, Staff Writer
A Republican judge from central Pennsylvania will fill the vacancy on the state Supreme Court left by Justice J. Michael Eakin, who resigned in March following the fallout from a pornography scandal. The appointment of Superior Court Judge Sallie Mundy, who was among a handful of judges nominated by Gov. Wolf this month, was approved Monday by the Senate. Eakin resigned amid allegations that he violated the sanctity of his office by exchanging raunchy emails with friends and colleagues.
NEWS
June 28, 2016 | By Ronnie Polaneczky
Update from the Associated Press:  The Supreme Court has struck down Texas' widely replicated regulation of abortion clinics in the court's biggest abortion case in nearly a quarter century. The original column continues below: KERMIT Gosnell's ears must be burning. For months, his name has been dropped again and again by anti-choice advocates in Texas who are invoking Gosnell to justify restrictions that have made it harder than ever for women to exercise their legal right to an abortion.
NEWS
June 28, 2016 | By Aubrey Whelan, Staff Writer
For four years, the Philadelphia District Attorney's Office has appealed a judge's decision granting a new trial in a 1991 case that sent a 19-year-old to prison for life in the killing of a police officer's brother. Although the state Supreme Court was set to hear yet another round of appeals in the case, early last week it decided against hearing it at all. Now, after nearly 25 years in prison, Jose Medina will again be tried for murder in the death of William Bogan, the brother of Officer Timothy Bogan, who was stabbed to death the evening of Oct. 18, 1991, in a Chinese takeout shop at Cambria and Mutter Streets in Fairhill.
NEWS
June 27, 2016
Kathryn Kolbert argued Planned Parenthood v. Casey, the 1992 Supreme Court case that has been widely credited with saving Roe v. Wade In 1973 and the first years after the Supreme Court decided Roe v. Wade , abortion was legal, accessible in most states, and low-income women could pay for it with Medicaid. Today, there are more than 1,000 laws against abortion on the books nationwide and federal laws ban Medicaid and federal insurance or health plans from paying for it, affecting low-income Americans, government workers, and members of the military.
NEWS
June 25, 2016 | By Susan Snyder and Jonathan Lai, STAFF WRITERS
The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday affirmed a Texas university's use of race in admissions, drawing praise from civil rights groups, which heralded the decision as a major victory for affirmative action. By a 4-3 vote, the court upheld the University of Texas at Austin's argument that it needed to consider race to ensure diversity of its student body and that it had exhausted other means of achieving that goal. The ruling came as a surprise to some experts, who had expected the court to rule in favor of Abigail Fisher, a white student who was denied admission in 2008.
NEWS
June 25, 2016 | By Michael Matza, Staff Writer
Thursday was a bad day for undocumented immigrants, among them Carlos Rojas. In the two decades since he illegally entered the United States from Mexico, Rojas, 44, has made a decent life for himself in South Philadelphia, working as a pastry chef and raising a family - while putting the ever-present possibility of deportation as far from his thoughts as he could. He found hope in a 2014 executive action by President Obama that would have protected him, as the parent of an American-born child, from being sent back to his homeland.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|