CollectionsSurgical Team
IN THE NEWS

Surgical Team

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 11, 1992 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In Browns Mills, success may be routine for surgeons and staff at Deborah Heart and Lung Center, but not in Lithuania, where complex heart anomalies went uncorrected because of a lack of equipment and knowledge of leading-edge surgical techniques. For children with those defects, death was nearly certain. Late last month, a 41-member surgical team from Deborah flew to Lithuania to change the odds of survival for 19 suffering children. Not only were delicate heart operations successful on all 19, but the surgical team also was able to impart advanced techniques to their Lithuanian counterparts.
NEWS
June 17, 1993 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The head of cardiovascular surgery in Latvia on Tuesday thanked an open- heart surgery team at Bryn Mawr Hospital for bringing equipment, modern procedures and happiness to the European country in a recent visit. Janis Volkolakovs, professor of surgery and head of the general and cardiovascular department for the Latvian Academy of Medicine, toasted the open-heart surgery team at a reception in his honor at the Founders Bank Building. "I hope the contact we started can continue," he said.
NEWS
March 20, 1986 | By Susan FitzGerald, Inquirer Staff Writer
The first pancreas transplant ever done in the Philadelphia area was performed last week on a patient at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, but the organ had to be removed shortly after the operation because of complications. Dr. Clyde Barker, chairman of the hospital's department of surgery, said the transplanted pancreas failed after clots developed in the blood vessels that supplied the organ. "The technical procedure worked fine and the initial function of the transplant was good," said Barker, who headed the 12-member surgical team that performed the pancreas transplant.
NEWS
January 22, 1987 | By RAMONA SMITH and LEON TAYLOR, Daily News Staff Writers
Surgeons at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, hoping to save the life of one of twin boys born joined at their hearts, today began a delicate eight- hour operation that the second twin was not expected to survive. Doctors began the rare surgery on the three-week-old twins about 8:20 a.m., expecting one child to die in the operating room and knowing the second still was not assured of survival. The separation of the babies, a hospital spokeswoman said, would leave one infant without a complete heart.
NEWS
April 13, 1988 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
The chief surgeon of Children's Hospital of Philadelphia said the 14-month- old Siamese twins separated in a 12-hour operation Monday have an "excellent" chance of long-term survival. Dr. James A. O'Neill Jr. said that with modern rehabilitation techniques, the girls have "excellent chances for an excellent quality of life. " A team of 13 doctors performed the successful surgery, the hospital announced. The twins will need extensive rehabilitative surgery in the future, physicians said.
NEWS
February 22, 2013 | BY GLORIA HOCHMAN, For the Inquirer
DENNIS KYRIAKATOS is lying on the table in operating room 15 at Temple University Hospital, just minutes away from life-changing surgery. Sterile, green surgical cloth drapes his body, exposing only his torso. The antibacterial solution chlorhexidine painted on his chest and abdomen has turned his skin into a mustard-colored canvas. He has been anesthetized for more than an hour. At 75, Kyriakatos suffers from a faulty mitral valve, which allows blood to flow into the heart's main pumping chamber.
NEWS
January 23, 1987 | By RAMONA SMITH, Daily News Staff Writer
A three-week-old boy has lost his short battle for life - a life that doctors at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia tried to buy for him yesterday by sacrificing his twin. The boy, identified publicly only as "Baby B," died just hours after the death of the brother who was born joined to him at the heart. The first infant, "Baby A," died on the operating table at noon during eight hours of surgery that separated the boys. The doctors knew they would lose Baby A, hospital officials said, when they decided to separate the twins.
NEWS
August 20, 1993 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writers Richard Jones and Cynthia Mayer contributed to this story
Doctors at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia said yesterday they would have to move quickly to separate the baby Lakeberg twins if either was to have even a slim chance at life. That is why they plan to cut them apart today, just four days after they arrived in Philadelphia. Because they share a single heart and a transplant is not feasible, the operation is an immediate death sentence for one of the girls. How much time it could grant the baby who keeps the heart is a mystery.
NEWS
February 14, 1992 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
Dear Jack: Welcome back! But don't you at least owe us a note explaining your absence? I'm sure the good nuns would have never let you return to your old desk without one. First, we were told that you were ill. Next, that you were in the process of recovering from some undisclosed surgery. Then, all of a sudden, you were back, without so much as a "scusa" for bumping Cal Thomas, thank you anyway. Yo, Jack (to borrow a Daily Newsism, which used to be a downtownism)
NEWS
August 21, 1993 | by Edward Moran, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News staff writer Yvonne Latty and The Associated Press contributed to this report
Little Angela Lakeberg's tiny fingernails were inted pink yesterday morning. Her Siamese twin sister Amy's were plain. The question of which twin would live or die had been settled. Now begins the battle of keeping the survivor alive. Doctors at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia successfully separated the Siamese twins during a 5 1/2-hour operation in which they reconstructed the single malformed heart the infants shared, placed it inside Angela, and let Amy die. "This is a difficult kind of experience," said Dr. James A. O'Neill Jr. following the surgery.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 22, 2013 | BY GLORIA HOCHMAN, For the Inquirer
DENNIS KYRIAKATOS is lying on the table in operating room 15 at Temple University Hospital, just minutes away from life-changing surgery. Sterile, green surgical cloth drapes his body, exposing only his torso. The antibacterial solution chlorhexidine painted on his chest and abdomen has turned his skin into a mustard-colored canvas. He has been anesthetized for more than an hour. At 75, Kyriakatos suffers from a faulty mitral valve, which allows blood to flow into the heart's main pumping chamber.
NEWS
January 23, 2000 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Matthew Scott takes enormous pleasure in the small things he can do - such as tying his shoes, driving with two hands on the wheel, picking up his 8- and 3-year-old sons at the same time, one with each arm. "I suppose taken individually they seem like nothing, but taken collectively they . . . make me happier than I ever thought," said Scott, 38, a paramedic from Absecon, N.J., who will celebrate his one-year anniversary Tuesday as the first American...
NEWS
August 21, 1993 | by Edward Moran, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News staff writer Yvonne Latty and The Associated Press contributed to this report
Little Angela Lakeberg's tiny fingernails were inted pink yesterday morning. Her Siamese twin sister Amy's were plain. The question of which twin would live or die had been settled. Now begins the battle of keeping the survivor alive. Doctors at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia successfully separated the Siamese twins during a 5 1/2-hour operation in which they reconstructed the single malformed heart the infants shared, placed it inside Angela, and let Amy die. "This is a difficult kind of experience," said Dr. James A. O'Neill Jr. following the surgery.
NEWS
August 20, 1993 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writers Richard Jones and Cynthia Mayer contributed to this story
Doctors at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia said yesterday they would have to move quickly to separate the baby Lakeberg twins if either was to have even a slim chance at life. That is why they plan to cut them apart today, just four days after they arrived in Philadelphia. Because they share a single heart and a transplant is not feasible, the operation is an immediate death sentence for one of the girls. How much time it could grant the baby who keeps the heart is a mystery.
NEWS
June 17, 1993 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The head of cardiovascular surgery in Latvia on Tuesday thanked an open- heart surgery team at Bryn Mawr Hospital for bringing equipment, modern procedures and happiness to the European country in a recent visit. Janis Volkolakovs, professor of surgery and head of the general and cardiovascular department for the Latvian Academy of Medicine, toasted the open-heart surgery team at a reception in his honor at the Founders Bank Building. "I hope the contact we started can continue," he said.
NEWS
October 11, 1992 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In Browns Mills, success may be routine for surgeons and staff at Deborah Heart and Lung Center, but not in Lithuania, where complex heart anomalies went uncorrected because of a lack of equipment and knowledge of leading-edge surgical techniques. For children with those defects, death was nearly certain. Late last month, a 41-member surgical team from Deborah flew to Lithuania to change the odds of survival for 19 suffering children. Not only were delicate heart operations successful on all 19, but the surgical team also was able to impart advanced techniques to their Lithuanian counterparts.
NEWS
September 18, 1992 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A 41-member surgical and medical team from Deborah Heart and Lung Center in Browns Mills will take off from Newark International Airport tomorrow for Lithuania, where the doctors will perform surgery on children with heart defects. The team from the Burlington County hospital is headed to Vilnius University Hospital, where it will attempt to help 20 children recover from congenital heart disease. Already there is medical equipment valued at $1.5 million that had been transported late last month by the 18th Airlift Squadron at McGuire Air Force Base.
NEWS
February 14, 1992 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
Dear Jack: Welcome back! But don't you at least owe us a note explaining your absence? I'm sure the good nuns would have never let you return to your old desk without one. First, we were told that you were ill. Next, that you were in the process of recovering from some undisclosed surgery. Then, all of a sudden, you were back, without so much as a "scusa" for bumping Cal Thomas, thank you anyway. Yo, Jack (to borrow a Daily Newsism, which used to be a downtownism)
NEWS
June 18, 1990 | By CLAUDE LEWIS
At 10:30 p.m. Wednesday, an off-duty Philadelphia police officer, Joaquin "Jack" Montijo, 35, looked out of a second-floor window and saw something that most police officers can't ignore: a man with a gun. A cop for just 19 months, Montijo became angry. "Enough is enough," he said to his girlfriend, Zoraida Perez. "This guy is going in. " Montijo drew his gun, which had been holstered on his right leg. Perez's pleas could not stop him from going out into danger, to face a man he had known and who had run up a lengthy police record, mostly for drug dealing.
NEWS
May 3, 1988 | By Dwight Ott, Inquirer Staff Writer
The tiny, blonde 6-year-old tossed against the catheter and I.V. lines that bound her, jostling the fluffy red clown on her pillow. "Nyet!" said one of the nurses at Deborah Heart and Lung Center. "Nyet! Don't do that - in any language!" The girl, Maya Shrago, tossed some more, but finally settled down as the "beep, beep, beep" of the heart monitor insisted that yesterday morning's open-heart surgery on the Soviet patient had worked and that glasnost had come to South Jersey.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|