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NEWS
January 1, 1987 | By Pete Schnatz, Special to The Inquirer
Understaffed and, for the first game, mentally unprepared, the Conestoga girls' basketball team went out and captured the Lansdale Catholic Christmas Tournament last weekend. It came as a total surprise to coach Karen Marley, who may come to expect the unexpected from now on. Marley and the Pioneers (5-4), under the impression that their tourney opener wasn't to be played until 6:30 Saturday night, put on a full-scale practice Friday morning that lasted for several hours. Then Marley received a phone call around 2:30 Friday afternoon telling her to make sure that Conestoga was ready for its opener that night.
SPORTS
May 19, 2006 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Flyers center Keith Primeau, who missed most of last season after suffering a concussion, underwent nasal surgery yesterday, team officials said. Sami Kapanen had minor surgery on his right shoulder yesterday, and Simon Gagne is recovering from hip surgery on May 10, the Flyers said. The operations on the two wingers were expected, but Primeau's surgery was a surprise. The 34-year-old center said he had been feeling pressure behind his nose for about two years. The surgery was performed at Cooper Hospital in Camden, and Primeau said he felt better immediately.
NEWS
January 16, 1989 | By Frank Lawlor, Special to The Inquirer
Because his team so often wins by blowout scores, Swarthmore Academy coach Mark Jordan can take advantage of huge leads to give his neophyte reserves some playing time. But winning games easily can have a negative side - it can lead to getting caught by surprise when a more competitive opponent comes to play. Mercy Vocational threatened to be that opponent Thursday. But with the help of Jordan's reserves, particularly junior guard Andre Jackson, the Knights were able to defeat their visitors, 87-74, in the non- league game.
BUSINESS
October 31, 1996 | By Lacy McCrary, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There was no shock and no surprise, but there was sadness and some anger among Bethlehem Steel Corp. workers affected by yesterday's announcement that three divisions here would be sold or closed. For the most part, there was a stoic acceptance of what many workers felt was the inevitable result of the company's long-range planning. "It was no surprise to me. It was just a matter of time, and we've been hearing about it for a long time," said Keith Heffelfinger, 39, of Freemansburg, an employee of one of the divisions, Bethforge Inc. "I'm definitely going to miss it," said Heffelfinger, a 17-year employee, as he finished his shift at the giant steel mill, which stretches five miles along the Lehigh River on the southern edge of this old town.
NEWS
February 26, 1998 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
Prominent black Baptist pastors in Philadelphia - already sharp critics of their national leader - say the Rev. Henry Lyons' indictment in Florida is neither a surprise nor a sign the National Baptist Convention U.S.A. Inc.'s turmoil will end soon. They say it's time for those who have protected Lyons to speak up and show him the door. The Rev. William Shaw, pastor of White Rock Baptist in West Philadelphia, said he has been considering a race for the presidency in 1999 - he finished third to Lyons in 1994 - but the indictment won't affect his plans.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2004 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Recalling both Casablanca and The Unbearable Lightness of Being, director Rolf Schubel's 1999 German-Hungarian affair, Gloomy Sunday, is a rich, romantic melodrama that surprised audiences when it opened in the spring. (And surprised theater owners, who had an unexpected hit on their hands.) Back for a return engagement, this beautiful 1930s-40s love story, which takes the song popularized by Billie Holiday for its title - and for a key element of its plot - is about a cafe pianist who falls for the cafe owner's lover, the cafe's waitress.
SPORTS
December 1, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
Boston College outhustled and outshot No. 18 Louisville, upsetting a team struggling to adjust to personnel changes. The Eagles, a preseason pick to finish near the bottom of the 13-team Big East, never trailed last night and won, 81-67, at Newton, Mass., with a strong inside game led by Danya Abrams's 30 points. "One of the things we talked to our kids about was a genuine lack of respect our kids have gotten, and rightly so because we struggled last year," Eagles coach Jim O'Brien said.
NEWS
September 17, 1989 | By Richard V. Sabatini, Inquirer Staff Writer
Capt. Robert Deeds, head of the 15th Police District at Harbison Avenue and Levick Street since February, retired abruptly from the police force on Tuesday. Inspector William McDonough, commander of the Northeast Police Division and Deeds' immediate supervisor, said he had not expected Deeds' decision. "I was surprised. It's a shame to see someone go who knows his job," McDonough said. A replacement was to have been named Friday, when citywide command reassignments were to be announced.
SPORTS
October 2, 1990 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Derrick Fenner ran for two touchdowns and caught a short pass from Dave Krieg for a third last night to lift the Seattle Seahawks to their first victory of the year, a 31-16 win over the previously unbeaten Cincinnati Bengals. Fenner, who also scored three touchdowns last week against Denver, went in from 4 and 3 yards out and caught a 2-yard scoring pass from Krieg. Krieg also connected with Tommy Kane on a 63-yard TD bomb on the first play of the fourth quarter. Defense played a key role in helping the Seahawks become the last team in the NFL to record its first win. Seattle (1-3)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1991 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
Parents' Choice, the nonprofit review of children's media, has just released its annual slew of awards, including those for best youth-oriented film fare. Among the titles on the '91 list, compiled by a national panel of critics (including this paper's), are two Disney reissues (Jungle Book and 101 Dalmatians); Kevin Costner's Robin Hood; Neal Jordan's study of Irish adolescents, The Miracle (recommended for "young adults, only with parents") and a couple of surprises: Boyz N the Hood and Bill & Ted's Bogus Journey.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 11, 2016 | By Ellen Gray, TELEVISION CRITIC
If you haven't seen the first season of USA's Mr. Robot and want to experience last summer's most surprising show for yourself, you might want to stop reading now and go to Amazon Prime, where all 10 episodes are available. When you return, we can struggle together with What It All Meant and talk about the new season. It says a lot about the kind of show Mr. Robot is that its creator, Sam Esmail, would like to see a spoiler alert on everything written about it, into perpetuity, and that, space permitting, I don't mind.
NEWS
July 10, 2016 | By Craig LaBan, Restaurant Critic
The unofficial start of summer - Memorial Day - is not a secret date. And any restaurateur with common sense and a measure of luck will do all they can to open a new restaurant before the gates bust open at the end of May. After that, the beach crowds come fast and hungry, and with none of the patience for early errors they'd afford at a new restaurant back home. Yet, there are the slowpokes who tease us well into early July with luscious social-media pics of dishes "in the works" and promises of "opening soon" while the sight of active work crews stoke a more skeptical view.
TRAVEL
June 27, 2016 | By Caroline Marques, For The Inquirer
It took about five minutes after landing in balmy Havana for things to go wrong. There were random questions at customs, an interminable wait to exchange money, and finally, the realization that no one from our confirmed casa particular was coming to meet us. That, combined with the fact that we were the only twentysomething tourists traveling among throngs of American missionaries and retirees, made for an interesting introduction to the city....
NEWS
June 12, 2016 | By Don Sapatkin, Staff Writer
Philadelphia City Council's decision to include diet drinks in a proposed beverage tax took public-health advocates by surprise and would move the city into unstudied territory. Advocates of a soda tax for health reasons say they have never pushed to include artificially sweetened beverages, because the scientific evidence linking sugar with obesity and diabetes is so much stronger. Far from being unhappy about the development, however, some see the move as an unexpected gift. Diet beverages "are filled with artificial sweeteners and chemicals.
NEWS
May 25, 2016
WAYWARD PINES . 9 p.m. Wednesday, Fox. WAS EVER A TOWN so ill-named as the one in Wayward Pines ? The community at the heart of Fox's M. Night Shyamalan-produced series doesn't value waywardness. Not in its trees. Not in its people. And as the sci-fi series, based on novels by Blake Crouch, returns Wednesday for a second 10-episode season, the tension between the rugged individualism that we like to think of as the American character and the fear-driven conformity that too often overtakes it is more than ever the focus.
FOOD
April 22, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
Matzo is known to Jews observing Passover as "the bread of affliction," and after eight days of eating the stuff, that title really starts to ring true. An overgrown cracker with cumbersome ridges and all the flavor of copy paper, it's an inelegant sandwich vehicle that tends to shatter under the pressure of a vigorous schmear. And yet, it turns out, matzo is also surprisingly versatile. At a time of year when other wheat-based foods are off the table, it can be a cook's secret weapon.
NEWS
April 4, 2016 | By Michael D. Schaffer
Three candidates come into the Republican convention seeking their party's presidential nomination, but none has enough delegate support to win on the first ballot. The result? A contested convention, with all the wheeling and dealing that high-stakes politics can generate, and in the end, a compromise candidate. A preview of this year's convention in Cleveland? Maybe, but also the scenario for the 1880 GOP convention in Chicago. The three candidates who couldn't get over the top that year were former President Ulysses S. Grant, back after four years out of office and seeking an unprecedented third term; Sen. James G. Blaine, who would be pilloried in a later presidential campaign as "the continental liar from the state of Maine"; and Secretary of the Treasury John Sherman, brother of Civil War hero William T. Sherman.
SPORTS
April 1, 2016 | By Ed Barkowitz, STAFF WRITER
THERE AREN'T many people who thought 10th-seeded Syracuse still would be standing among the Final Four. No matter what you think of Jim Boeheim, the guy can coach. But his mystifying matchup defense is just one of the topics now that everyone has settled into Houston. There's the NCAA infractions that led to Boeheim's nine-game suspension and the 108 wins that subsequently were vacated. And the late-season slump that dropped the Orange's RPI to 72 still wasn't enough to keep them out of the NCAA Tournament field.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2016
While I'm away, readers give the advice.   On taking offense when grown kids choose a hotel over staying with you: Please don't see your kids' personal preferences as something at which you lose. That sets up a competition where none exists, and where "losing" means letting others live as they choose, and "winning" means making others submit to your narrow definition of a close family. Wanting independence to decide when to leave an event and where to sleep with a spouse - these are perfectly reasonable, non-insulting, grown-up choices.
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