CollectionsSurprise Inspection
IN THE NEWS

Surprise Inspection

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 12, 1988 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
A surveyor for the organization which accredits hospitals and other health- care institutions has performed a surprise inspection of the embattled James C. Giuffre Medical Center, according to hospital sources. The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations visited pathologists at Giuffre and the hospital's surgical areas on Thursday, the sources said. The commission is a private, voluntary organization that reviews and evaluates medical care in most of the nation's hospitals.
NEWS
August 27, 1987 | By Mike Schurman, Special to The Inquirer
About 350 gamblers were temporarily stranded here yesterday when the buses that brought them to this seaside casino resort were pulled off the road after failing a surprise inspection. Citing faulty equipment, traffic safety inspectors grounded seven of 30 buses that were parked at Brighton Park, a section of the city where the Sands Hotel & Casino, the Claridge Hotel & Casino and Bally's Park Place Casino Hotel are located. Judy Coss, bus management director for the Atlantic County Transportation Authority, said that two buses failed exhaust emission tests, two had faulty brakes, two had tires that were not properly secured, and one had faulty turn signals.
NEWS
May 12, 1998 | By Lewis Kamb, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Even over the idling Peterbilt's purrs, pops and rattles, George Amare's voice could easily be heard. "This whole thing is a big setup," he barked, waving two yellow citation slips for a total of $158 with a calloused right hand. "When this town needs some money to pay their bills or whatever, they come out here and take it out on us truckers. " With a muddy work boot propping open the door of his four-axle dump truck, the stocky, 42-year-old trash hauler from Newark, N.J., shouted his disgust at receiving two of the 97 citations issued to scores of truckers yesterday during a surprise inspection by Falls Township officials.
NEWS
December 9, 1996 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The owners of the Chester Exchange here say they have observed a pattern in their 15-month-long battle with city officials over the enforcement of safety regulations at the retail complex. Every time business starts to pick up, the city cites the exchange for safety violations, generating a new wave of bad publicity, say Barbara DeNero and her husband, John. The city's actions, the DeNeros maintain, reflect a pattern of harassment, motivated by a desire to drive them out of business and see the exchange, which Barbara DeNero purchased last year with a $250,000 loan from the city, reopen under new ownership.
NEWS
August 3, 1989 | By Cynthia Mayer, Inquirer Staff Writer
State health investigators swooped down on Manchester House nursing home for a surprise inspection this week, the first step toward negotiating a possible settlement to allow the home to stay open. Investigators arrived without notice on Tuesday and planned to stay at least two and possibly three days, according to Bob Fisher, press secretary for the state Department of Health. In that time, they will check to see if the embattled Media nursing home has corrected the conditions that caused the state to revoke its license July 14. According to the state, the home's problems range from inadequate record- keeping and nursing care to inadequate sanitation in the kitchen.
NEWS
July 22, 2000 | by Dana DiFilippo, Daily News Staff Writer
Inside Matthew Hart's art studio on Sansom Street yesterday morning, teen-agers toiled with paintbrushes and posterboard to make colorful signs and puppets for protests planned during the upcoming Republican National Convention. Outside the studio yesterday afternoon, TV news vans whined, passers-by gawked and GOP protesters were perturbed after city officials closed it - and the entire seven-story, brick building housing it. City inspectors cited "a dozen or so" violations of fire and building codes.
NEWS
March 30, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA State officials shut down a Philadelphia day-care center run by the man at the heart of a political-corruption scandal Friday, a day after a surprise inspection found that children there were potentially endangered. Public Welfare Department officials cited conditions that created a likelihood of an "immediate and serious danger to the life or health" of children at the Logan Child Care and Resource Center at 4802 N. Broad St. The center is owned by Tyron Ali, an undercover operative who sources say taped five Philadelphia Democrats accepting cash or gifts.
NEWS
March 22, 2000 | by Nicole Weisensee, Daily News Staff Writer
Blazin' Blue, the city's most controversial police horse, is not lame, according to the Pennsylvania SPCA. George Stem, director of animal control and investigations at the SPCA, and another investigator checked the horse out late last month. They also examined the other 30 or so horses at the police stables in Northeast Philadelphia and conditions in which they're kept. "We inspected all of the horses there - including Blazin' Blue - to make sure everything was in accordance," Stem said in a recent interview.
BUSINESS
January 28, 2010 | By Suzette Parmley and Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Philadelphia-based Aramark Corp. feeds the world - with operations in 19 countries and 12,000 employees in Pennsylvania alone. It has provided catering at 15 Olympic Games since 1968, and it will handle the Vancouver Winter Games starting next month. It is the food-and-beverage provider to as many as 30 ballparks, stadiums, and arenas, as well as 40 convention and civic centers around the globe. Its vast clientele in the region includes Citizens Bank Park, Independence Blue Cross, and Lincoln Financial Field.
NEWS
January 29, 2010 | By Craig LaBan INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
Certainly, there would be no "mice-and-beans" or "rat-atouille" lunch specials on the menu. But with a track record of dismal health inspections like the one that Philadelphia-based Aramark Corp. has racked up lately at the Capitol Cafe in the state capital, the punch lines were bound to come. "So, we going to the poop-ateria?" said James Roxbury, a cafeteria regular who runs an online news service, as he welcomed me to lunch yesterday. With a buildup like that, how could I say no?
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 30, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA State officials shut down a Philadelphia day-care center run by the man at the heart of a political-corruption scandal Friday, a day after a surprise inspection found that children there were potentially endangered. Public Welfare Department officials cited conditions that created a likelihood of an "immediate and serious danger to the life or health" of children at the Logan Child Care and Resource Center at 4802 N. Broad St. The center is owned by Tyron Ali, an undercover operative who sources say taped five Philadelphia Democrats accepting cash or gifts.
NEWS
January 29, 2010 | By Craig LaBan INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
Certainly, there would be no "mice-and-beans" or "rat-atouille" lunch specials on the menu. But with a track record of dismal health inspections like the one that Philadelphia-based Aramark Corp. has racked up lately at the Capitol Cafe in the state capital, the punch lines were bound to come. "So, we going to the poop-ateria?" said James Roxbury, a cafeteria regular who runs an online news service, as he welcomed me to lunch yesterday. With a buildup like that, how could I say no?
NEWS
January 29, 2010 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
HARRISBURG - Certainly, there would be no "mice-and-beans" or "rat-atouille" lunch specials on the menu. But with a track record of dismal health inspections like the one that Philadelphia-based Aramark Corp. has racked up lately at the Capitol Cafe in the state capital, the punch lines were bound to come. "So, we going to the poop-ateria?" said James Roxbury, a cafeteria regular who runs an online news service, as he welcomed me to lunch yesterday. With a buildup like that, how could I say no?
BUSINESS
January 28, 2010 | By Suzette Parmley and Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Philadelphia-based Aramark Corp. feeds the world - with operations in 19 countries and 12,000 employees in Pennsylvania alone. It has provided catering at 15 Olympic Games since 1968, and it will handle the Vancouver Winter Games starting next month. It is the food-and-beverage provider to as many as 30 ballparks, stadiums, and arenas, as well as 40 convention and civic centers around the globe. Its vast clientele in the region includes Citizens Bank Park, Independence Blue Cross, and Lincoln Financial Field.
NEWS
February 24, 2003 | By Jonathan Gelb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mayor Street announced yesterday that the city would perform surprise inspections in some of Philadelphia's 200 nightclubs after two recent disasters that left 118 people dead. Street said city agencies would also review fire, permitting and building code regulations, then issue a written report to him within 60 days. Street said he did not know how many nightclubs would get the surprise inspections, adding that they would not take the form of a "witch-hunt. " "Out of a sheer abundance of caution, we are going to take a look at everything," Street said at a news conference last night at City Hall.
NEWS
July 22, 2000 | by Dana DiFilippo, Daily News Staff Writer
Inside Matthew Hart's art studio on Sansom Street yesterday morning, teen-agers toiled with paintbrushes and posterboard to make colorful signs and puppets for protests planned during the upcoming Republican National Convention. Outside the studio yesterday afternoon, TV news vans whined, passers-by gawked and GOP protesters were perturbed after city officials closed it - and the entire seven-story, brick building housing it. City inspectors cited "a dozen or so" violations of fire and building codes.
NEWS
March 22, 2000 | by Nicole Weisensee, Daily News Staff Writer
Blazin' Blue, the city's most controversial police horse, is not lame, according to the Pennsylvania SPCA. George Stem, director of animal control and investigations at the SPCA, and another investigator checked the horse out late last month. They also examined the other 30 or so horses at the police stables in Northeast Philadelphia and conditions in which they're kept. "We inspected all of the horses there - including Blazin' Blue - to make sure everything was in accordance," Stem said in a recent interview.
NEWS
March 8, 2000 | By Huntly Collins, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Federal regulators yesterday announced new measures aimed at better protecting patients in human gene-therapy experiments. The measures, adopted after a gene-therapy death at the University of Pennsylvania in September, fall far short of the reforms advocated by many bioethicists. But federal officials said they hoped the initiatives would help restore public confidence in the ability of government to protect patients from undue risks in this competitive field of experimental medicine.
NEWS
February 17, 1999 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
During a surprise big-rig inspection on Interstate 95 near Philadelphia International Airport, authorities yesterday put the brakes on Hueland Walden. The 65-year-old truck driver from Darby was arrested. "For what?" he protested. "For scofflaw," the Highway Patrol officer answered. The handcuffs were slapped in place, and Walden, who police said owed nearly $500 in fines for moving violations, was led into a Philadelphia Traffic Court van to be arraigned in Center City.
NEWS
January 22, 1999 | by Scott Heimer, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Nicole Weisensee contributed to this report
So here comes a tractor-trailer down I-95. Everything's OK except for the brakes. It doesn't have any on the two rear axles. "It's fine as long as you don't go too fast," griped the driver as cops wrote him an array of tickets during yesterday's crackdown on unsafe trucks. The crackdown, the latest in a continuing police campaign inspired by Daily News stories about killer trucks, got six dangerous trucks off the road. Police told the owners of those rigs - including the one without rear brakes - to fetch their vehicles with a tow truck.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|