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Susquehanna River

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NEWS
August 31, 2013 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Delaware County police spent Wednesday and Thursday searching the Susquehanna River for the body of a missing baby after cadaver dogs "hit on something" near the riverbank, police said. "We did not find the baby," said Michael J. Chitwood, Superintendent of Upper Darby police. The continued search for 7-month-old Hamza Ali came about after detectives decided to visit the area again based on a comment made by the York County man who has been charged with the child's murder, said Chitwood.
NEWS
April 25, 1993 | By Susan Q. Stranahan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
We had been on the water all of about three minutes before the Susquehanna River offered up its first surprise. Rounding a bend, our canoes startled a flock of Canada geese whose graceful takeoff was mirrored perfectly in the river's green-glass surface - down to the beads of water dripping from their ungainly feet. That was just the beginning. Before lunch, a large buck burst from the woods and leaped into the water, barely missing a canoe. He swam to the opposite shore and lunged up the steep, forested bank, disappearing with a flick of his signature white tail.
NEWS
January 21, 1996 | By Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As Joseph Cooper fled his home yesterday with his belongings in his trunk, he glanced back at the Susquehanna River. In his life, great floods on this majestic river have forced him from his home four times - in 1936, 1940, 1972 and, now, 1996. "Back in '72 I found a coffin in my backyard," Cooper said at an evacuation center at a local vocational school. "This time, the river looked just as bad. It was swirling. " But disaster was averted yesterday for Cooper and about 100,000 residents who were evacuated from their homes in the Wyoming Valley.
NEWS
June 17, 1986 | By Rich Heidorn Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer (United Press International contributed to this article.)
At least 16 people were reported injured last night as heavy thunderstorms whipped north-central Pennsylvania with rain, hail and damaging winds. There also were unconfirmed reports of several tornados. David Whipple, the fire chief of Athens, Bradford County, said 15 people were treated after winds toppled trees across rides at a town carnival and "blew everything out of our pavilion" where the carnival was being held. Officials said 13 of the people were taken to a hospital, where they were treated for scrapes and cuts and later released.
NEWS
April 3, 1993 | By Michael E. Ruane, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writer Russell E. Eshleman Jr. and the Associated Press contributed to this article
"The boss" is what Shirley Pierontoni calls it. You can't figure it, she says, because it never comes the same way twice. You can't fight it, because it's too big and will simply have its way. And you can't ignore it; you must do what it says. As she stood yesterday beside the flooded video store she runs in the basement of her home here, near Wilkes-Barre, she heard its message loud and clear: Get out. A stone's throw from her two-story, white-shingled home, "the boss" - the swollen, coffee-colored Susquehanna River - galloped along, bearing across its surface a tide of debris and a warning.
NEWS
September 9, 2011 | By Mike Newall, Maria Panaritis, Jeff Gammage, and Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Staff Writers
WILKES-BARRE - Authorities evacuated parts of this riverside city and surrounding towns Thursday as rising floodwaters pushed against protective levees, and Gov. Corbett put the state on an emergency footing not seen since the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. Across Pennsylvania, the wash and churn of floodwater closed major highways, destroyed property, and forced the hurried, worried evacuation of thousands. An estimated 65,000 people sought shelter in schools and churches here, leaving streets eerily empty as officials cast a nervous eye on a river that threatened to spill over the levees late Thursday - and older residents remembered a storm named Agnes.
NEWS
October 25, 1998 | By William R. Macklin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
We drove north beyond Harrisburg, off the Pennsylvania Turnpike and deep into the state's interior along U.S. Route 15. To the east, the Susquehanna River seemed to uncoil like a snake, the midday sun reflecting off its green-blue skin. West of us sat a succession of small rural towns as distinctively homespun as any in the Northeast, the cliffs and hillocks, valleys and rises of the Appalachian Ridge at their backs. All around us autumn was unfolding in a majestic swirl of oranges, reds and golden yellows.
NEWS
September 11, 2011 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
WILKES-BARRE - Luzerne County emergency management officials lifted mandatory evacuation orders affecting about 70,000 people around Wilkes-Barre on Saturday as the engorged Susquehanna River receded from a record-setting 42.66-foot crest. By noon, the water had pulled back to about 31 feet, dropping about a half-foot per hour, said Jim Brozena, executive director of the Luzerne County Flood Protection Authority. Authorities began letting residents back into areas protected by levees by 2:30 p.m. Officials said they did not know when residents from communities without levee protection would be allowed to return home.
NEWS
October 28, 2013
Banker for peace The recent death of my longtime good friend, Philadelphia banker Frederick Heldring, reminded me of a 1970s incident that epitomized the man's character. At the time, Fred had helped found and was the leader of a group of area business men and women called "business executives against the Vietnam War," of which I was also a founder. Fred was then a senior executive at Philadelphia National Bank, and the business community knew that it was imminent that he would become the PNB chairman.
NEWS
September 10, 2011 | By Jeremy Roebuck, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
WILKES-BARRE - Luzerne County emergency management officials lifted mandatory evacuation orders affecting about 70,000 around Wilkes-Barre Saturday, as the engorged Susquehanna River receded from a record-setting 42.66-foot crest. By noon, water levels had pulled back to about 31 feet, dropping at a rate of about a half foot per hour, said Jim Brozena, executive director of the Luzerne County Flood Protection Authority. Authorities began letting residents back into areas protected by levees by 2:30 p.m. Officials said they did not know when residents from communities without levee protection would be allowed to return home.
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NEWS
March 11, 2016
I'm a firm believer that there's no better way to discover a new town than from a bar stool, and that was never better illustrated than my trek last weekend to north-central Pennsylvania. This big-city boy has lived in Philadelphia nearly his entire life, never bothering to venture a mere two hours to the small towns that cling to the Susquehanna River and its western branch. Places like Berwick, Shamokin, and Mifflinburg. But offer me a beer and, well . . . That's the idea behind the River Rat Brew Trail linking nine breweries in Columbia, Montour, Northumberland, and Union Counties - the state's midsection, where old coal mines give way to rolling farms and game lands.
NEWS
October 28, 2013
Banker for peace The recent death of my longtime good friend, Philadelphia banker Frederick Heldring, reminded me of a 1970s incident that epitomized the man's character. At the time, Fred had helped found and was the leader of a group of area business men and women called "business executives against the Vietnam War," of which I was also a founder. Fred was then a senior executive at Philadelphia National Bank, and the business community knew that it was imminent that he would become the PNB chairman.
NEWS
August 31, 2013 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Delaware County police spent Wednesday and Thursday searching the Susquehanna River for the body of a missing baby after cadaver dogs "hit on something" near the riverbank, police said. "We did not find the baby," said Michael J. Chitwood, Superintendent of Upper Darby police. The continued search for 7-month-old Hamza Ali came about after detectives decided to visit the area again based on a comment made by the York County man who has been charged with the child's murder, said Chitwood.
NEWS
August 27, 2013
MOUNT WOLF, Pa. - He lives in a place named for his family, in an 1850s house built by his family, and runs a company started by his family in 1843. He has an Ivy League (Dartmouth) undergrad degree, a master's from the University of London and a doctorate from MIT. His doctoral dissertation (the bound version is the size of a Manhattan phone book) is titled Congressional Sea Change: Conflict and Organizational Accommodation in the House of Representatives 1878-1921 . I have not read it. But I have spent time with Tom Wolf, chairman/CEO of the Wolf Organization, largest supplier of kitchen and bath cabinetry in the U.S., at his home in this tiny York County borough just west of the Susquehanna River.
NEWS
August 10, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
NEWPORT - The Howe boat launch on the Juniata River is only about 25 miles north of Harrisburg, but it seems a continent away from the maelstrom of Pennsylvania politics. A year out from his formal reelection campaign, Gov. Corbett is the subject of frequent pummeling by the press, the polls, and the pundits. But the cacophony dissipates as the regular nature-loving guy in hiking shorts and T-shirt climbs into his blue kayak and slips into the river. The idea of a kayak trek on Pennsylvania waterways, begun on a whim three years ago after Corbett signed his first state budget, has now become an administration summer tradition.
TRAVEL
November 25, 2012 | By Tom Barnes, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
JERSEY SHORE, Pa. - If you travel to this small riverfront town with the odd name, don't expect to find TV's Snooki and The Situation or see wide sandy beaches with a boardwalk and a big blue ocean. They're in another state, 250 miles to the east. But if you want to drive along the western branch of the Susquehanna River, view the changing fall foliage in the surrounding mountains, hike or bike a 65-mile trail along scenic Pine Creek, or fish and hunt in nearby state parks and forests, then this north-central Pennsylvania town of 4,000 would be worth the four-hour drive from Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Susquehanna River Basin Commission will reconsider more than 20 water permits it approved for Marcellus Shale gas drillers during a raucous meeting last month that was disrupted by antidrilling activists. The SRBC said Monday that it would hear new public comment Feb. 16 for 24 water-withdrawal applications it approved in December. Environmental groups have questioned the validity of the commission's vote, which was conducted hastily after demonstrators interrupted public testimony.
NEWS
September 11, 2011 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
WILKES-BARRE - Luzerne County emergency management officials lifted mandatory evacuation orders affecting about 70,000 people around Wilkes-Barre on Saturday as the engorged Susquehanna River receded from a record-setting 42.66-foot crest. By noon, the water had pulled back to about 31 feet, dropping about a half-foot per hour, said Jim Brozena, executive director of the Luzerne County Flood Protection Authority. Authorities began letting residents back into areas protected by levees by 2:30 p.m. Officials said they did not know when residents from communities without levee protection would be allowed to return home.
NEWS
September 11, 2011 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
WILKES-BARRE - It was a matter of simple math - an equation laid out more than three decades ago and an answer that brought palpable relief last week to thousands along the raging Susquehanna River. For others, though, the sum equaled nothing less than utter devastation. When the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers called in 1979 for raising levees in Wilkes-Barre by three to five feet after Tropical Storm Agnes, it cited the nearly $3 billion in damage that storm had caused to justify the expense.
NEWS
September 10, 2011 | By Jeremy Roebuck, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
WILKES-BARRE - Luzerne County emergency management officials lifted mandatory evacuation orders affecting about 70,000 around Wilkes-Barre Saturday, as the engorged Susquehanna River receded from a record-setting 42.66-foot crest. By noon, water levels had pulled back to about 31 feet, dropping at a rate of about a half foot per hour, said Jim Brozena, executive director of the Luzerne County Flood Protection Authority. Authorities began letting residents back into areas protected by levees by 2:30 p.m. Officials said they did not know when residents from communities without levee protection would be allowed to return home.
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