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NEWS
January 18, 2000
Thanks to a University of Texas professor, America now has proof of what every driver of a lowly sedan has sensed: sport-utility vehicles, pickup trucks and minivans are clogging up traffic. It's simple math - a larger vehicle that accelerates more slowly takes longer to get through an intersection than a smaller, more nimble car. So reports Kara Kockelman, an assistant professor of civil engineering. She adds that drivers of cars tend to hang back behind those "light trucks" because we can't see around them.
NEWS
December 8, 2000 | by Eric Peters
You wouldn't take a sports car off-roading - or expect it to plow through a snowstorm. Low ground clearance and high-performance tires with stiff sidewalls are not the ticket for slogging through mud or negotiating unpaved, rock-strewn roads. It's generally understood that these specialty vehicles are designed to corner and accelerate better than average cars on dry, paved roads - but the price you pay for this superior capability in the "sporty" department is offset by a built-in disadvantage when the pavement ends or the weather turns foul.
NEWS
August 1, 2001
TO THOSE protesting my bumper sticker campaign against full-size SUVs: A midsized car engine produces 19.5 pounds of CO2 for each gallon of gasoline. A full-sized SUV produces twice that much. Since 1990, SUVs and light trucks have wasted an extra 70 billion gallons of gasoline. If my midsized car gets into an accident with your SUV, your children will probably survive and mine won't, yet SUVs have higher death rates than cars in single-vehicle crashes, not even counting the roll-over problem.
NEWS
March 4, 2003 | MARK ALAN HUGHES
THE LOCAL papers have gloated over recent wins in several public debates that newspapers remain uniquely suited to lead. Let's examine two - the Chestnut Street reopening and the SUV wars - whose ultimate lessons are yet to come. Mayor Street has decided to re-open the block of Chestnut Street in front of Independence Hall, trumping his earlier decision to accommodate the (continuing) security concerns of the National Park Service. His decision illustrates that all politics is local; the mayor responded to vocal local interests over abstract global concerns.
NEWS
July 17, 2008 | By JACK SMITH For the Daily News
IN THE SAFARI camps of Botswana, the first thing they tell you is to stay on the wooden walkways that wind their way through the jungle some five and six feet off the ground. As long as you do, they say, the lions and leopards with whom you share the leafy forest will leave you alone. It is a different story in Uganda, where it takes more than an elevated sidewalk to discourage the big cats. In fact, the country is home to a breed of carnivores known as "tree-climbing" lions for reasons that became evident as we motored out of Uganda's Kibale National Park.
NEWS
June 25, 1998 | by Scott Heimer, Daily News Staff Writer
Do we believe that a crash involving a sport-utility vehicle and a car would be devastating for the car? Definitely. Do we also lay the responsibility for fixing the inequity square in the laps of the Big Three domestic automakers in Detroit? You got it. Those are the results of a new national poll released recently by the Independent Insurance Agents of America which, along with other special interest groups, have been leaning on automakers to make safety design changes to their SUVs.
NEWS
March 4, 2003
KUDOS TO Don Russell and the investigative staff at the Daily News on their important revelation of Philadelphia's oversized and wasteful SUV and Hummer fleet. When a private citizen elects to purchase one of these unnecessary, dangerous and environmentally harmful vehicles, it is that person's choice. When taxpayer dollars are used, it's an act of fraud, waste and abuse. And the leadership of the Philadelphia Gas Works should be fired for their low number of SUVs. This agency is threatening to tarnish city government's image as a corrupt body unconcerned with taxpayer and citizen needs.
NEWS
October 12, 2012 | By Tom Krisher and Yuri Kageyama, Associated Press
DETROIT - The largest recall in Toyota's 75-year history is threatening to undermine the carmaker's comeback from natural disasters and embarrassing safety problems. The company on Wednesday recalled 7.43 million cars, trucks, and SUVs worldwide to fix faulty power window switches that can cause fires. The recall affects more than a dozen models produced from 2005 through 2010 around the world including the Camry, the top-selling car in the United States. It's bigger than the seven million vehicles recalled two years ago for floor mats that can trap accelerator pedals and cause unintended acceleration.
NEWS
November 30, 2000
When the driver sitting 'way up there in that sport utility vehicle isn't riding your bumper in traffic, or crowding your space in the parking lot, he's taking forever to fill up at the pump. And now you say he's getting a break on auto insurance? Arrrgh. Jimmy Carter got it right. . . . Or so it would seem from the latest move by the nation's largest auto insurer. Illinois-based State Farm Insurance Co. will offer slightly lower rates for cars and trucks with the best safety records - including some of those bruiser SUVs.
NEWS
January 15, 2003 | By Cathy Young
It was only a matter of time: A new television ad campaign suggests that if you drive a sport utility vehicle, you are helping terrorism by putting money in the pockets of oil-producing, terrorism-sponsoring countries like Saudi Arabia and Iraq. One of the commercials cuts from a man at a gas station to a map of the Middle East to video footage of a terrorist training camp, while a little girl's voice says, "These are the terrorists who get money from those countries every time George fills up his SUV. " The commercials, which started Sunday, are already causing controversy.
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NEWS
October 23, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
A dark-colored Pathfinder crashed into the side of a medical building on Chestnut Street in Center City just after 9:15 p.m., breaking the calm on a pleasant fall evening as fire, police and other first responders rushed to the scene. The driver, a man whose name was not released, was rushed to Jefferson Hospital, where he was in stable condition with unspecified injuries, said Philadelphia Police Sgt. Rich Paraschak. No other injuries were reported. The scene at 833 Chestnut was filled by fire trucks, police cars and bystanders strolling the neighborhood who stopped to take cellphone photos of the vehicle protruding from the ground level of the building known as Jefferson Medical Offices.
NEWS
October 2, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Police investigators continued Tuesday to comb through ashes and scorch marks left in a parking lot where an SUV belonging to a rabbi was torched last Wednesday night after he parked it before conducting Rosh Hashanah services at the adjacent Rodef Sholom Orthodox Synagogue. Rabbi David Kushner said that while it was unclear whether the case was specifically a hate crime, it is being investigated as a "suspicious" fire by police. Police declined to comment on the case and have not released an official report on it. "Until the police finish their investigation, it is impossible to know what the motive was, what was going through somebody's mind," said Kushner, of Philadelphia's Rhawnhurst section, who recently became Rodef Sholom's rabbi.
NEWS
October 1, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
RABBI DAVID KUSHNER is having a rough start to the Jewish New Year. "We're trying to look at this situation positively," Kushner, of Rhawnhurst, told the Daily News last night. "The year can only get better from here. " Early Thursday, his Ford Explorer was torched as it sat parked in the lot next to the Rodef Sholom Synagogue in Atlantic City, the rabbi said. Kushner recently became the synagogue's rabbi, and had parked the SUV in the lot Wednesday night before conducting Rosh Hashanah services.
NEWS
September 7, 2014 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writer
A 10-year-old boy who was struck and dragged by an SUV while riding his bicycle Thursday in Northeast Philadelphia died early Friday morning, police said. About 8:20 p.m. Thursday, Mekhi Freeman was riding near the intersection of Loretto and Longshore Avenues in Castor Gardens, police said, when a Cadillac Escalade stopped at a stop sign at Longshore. Riding west through the intersection, Mekhi was struck by the accelerating SUV, which was heading south. The boy was dragged about 50 feet, said Officer Tanya Little, a police spokeswoman.
NEWS
September 5, 2014 | By Angela Couloumbis and Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writers
Two of the three Bucks County teenagers killed in an SUV crash last weekend apparently were not wearing seat belts when the vehicle flipped multiple times off a northeastern Pennsylvania road, police said Wednesday. The third victim died despite wearing his seat belt, police said, but a fourth passenger, also a student at Council Rock South High School, was unbuckled in the vehicle and escaped with minor injuries. As accident reconstruction experts continued their investigation, State Police also confirmed that the driver, an unlicensed 15-year-old from New York who may have been speeding, will be charged in juvenile court.
NEWS
September 4, 2014 | By Chris Palmer, Ben Finley, and Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writers
The SUV that flipped and rolled off a northeastern Pennsylvania road last weekend, killing three Bucks County teenagers, was driven by a 15-year-old New York girl who may have been speeding, authorities said Tuesday. As Council Rock South High School and its community opened the school year facing a numbing succession of funerals and memorial services, investigators prepared possible charges in the case. Wayne County District Attorney Janine Edwards declined to identify the driver or the charges, except to say they would be processed in juvenile court.
NEWS
August 17, 2014 | By Al Haas, For The Inquirer
Lexus invented the luxury crossover SUV when it introduced its RX model 16 years ago. For that Edisonesque accomplishment, the upmarket manufacturer was issued a license to print money. The RX sells more than 100,000 copies a year, making it this country's top-selling luxury vehicle. That many sales of a vehicle that starts at $40,795 translates into yumongous yens, particularly when you're talking about premium-brand profit margins. Now, it seems, the king of the Lexus showrooms will have to cede a little floor space to a new kid brother, the Lexus NX. Due in the dealerships in late November/early December, the NX is Lexus' new entry-level crossover, a somewhat smaller, sportier, and cheaper variation on the RX. Unlike the pioneering RX, however, the NX is rather late to the compact crossover party.
NEWS
August 12, 2014 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
THE HOT August sun beat heavily on 19th Street and Hunting Park Avenue yesterday. But that didn't stop Jameer Greer, 10, and Jhafi Sexton, 15, from standing at the corner, directing drivers to a car wash on the block. Greer and Sexton spent the day working the event at Time Out Car Wash, in Nicetown, as part of a fundraiser for WANPAE - Worry About Nothing Purpose is Alive in Everyone - a Philly organization that teaches preteens and teenagers entrepreneurship and how to pursue their passions.
NEWS
August 6, 2014 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three small white caskets stood open at the front of the church, covered in flowers. One man doubled over in grief at the sight. Another sagged into the arms of relatives, who struggled to hold him up as he choked out two words: "My boy. " Relatives and friends clung to each other as they made their way down the aisle at the North Philadelphia Seventh-day Adventist Church. One woman rushed down the aisle, crying, "It's not real. " As the bodies of three siblings lay in the white caskets on a bright Monday morning, hundreds filed past to pay their respects - politicians and pastors, teachers from Mary McLeod Bethune Elementary, and even a local motorcycle club, decked out in leather vests.
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