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Swan Song

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2001 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
This is it: the final Philadelphia Orchestra program in the Academy of Music. Yes, the orchestra will return for the annual Academy gala, but these four concerts will bring down the curtain on a century-long tradition. The program celebrates the past and looks forward to a new era. The melody-rich Tchaikovsky's Fifth Symphony and urgent Wagner "Flying Dutchman" Overture are signature pieces of Leopold Stokowski, Eugene Ormandy and Riccardo Muti, as well as the current music director Wolfgang Sawallisch.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1987 | By Richard Fuller, Special to The Inquirer
On the cover it's called "The Year's Most Frightening Book!" Maybe. At 956 pages, it sure is the season's best buy per pound: Swan Song by Robert R. McCammon (Pocket Books, $4.95). The cover shows a ghoulish, leering thing with pointy ears and smoke and a giant sun behind it. It is leering down at a sort of cracked, rocky wasteland. Yes, it's nuclear holocaust time again, in this tale of motley but good- hearted characters surviving the nastiness. It turns into a kind of morality confrontation between a life-providing young girl and the good (i.e.
NEWS
June 8, 1990 | By Nancy Goldner, Inquirer Dance Critic
The Pennsylvania Ballet's final engagement of the season, productions of Romeo and Juliet and Giselle running through June 17 at the Academy of Music, will mark the Philadelphia swan songs of three of the company's eight principal dancers - Melissa Podcasy, Marin Boieru and Debra Austin. Janey McGeary and Mary LeGere, both soloists, are also leaving the company. All but LeGere say they're leaving as a result of Robert Weiss' dismissal as artistic director in January. Said Austin, speaking as well for her companion, Boieru: "We just can't picture ourselves in the company anymore.
NEWS
November 6, 1995 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
"I've been waiting here at the Gates of Heaven. Waiting for us to forgive and get together" - Phyllis Hyman Frank Sinatra has been summing up his life and boldly bidding us adieu for decades with "My Way. " Longtime cancer sufferer Bob Marley exited the world on a bittersweet note with his modestly autobiographical and reverant "Redemption Songs. " Many's the Grateful Dead album that carried a folksy farewell sung by that "Friend of the Devil" Jerry Garcia. But never has an artist produced an entire album that reflects so hauntingly on her life and hints so broadly of her imminent demise as does Phyllis Hyman's "I Refuse to Be Lonely" (Philadelphia International/Zoo Entertainment)
SPORTS
March 16, 1987 | By Ray Parrillo, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the Russian Roulette atmosphere of the NCAA tournament, Nate Blackwell figured he still had an empty chamber or two to play with before the gun went off on his spectacular career at Temple. But when the skinny, 6-foot-4 guard looked up at the Rosemont Horizon's scoreboard yesterday and saw his team trailing Louisiana State by nine points with less than 20 seconds remaining, he realized that the chamber was loaded and his playing days at Temple were finished. "I looked up at the clock and saw there were 15 seconds left, and I knew that was the end for me," said Blackwell, whose red-rimmed eyes matched those of most of his teammates.
SPORTS
January 11, 2004 | By Bob Brookover INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nothing and everything has changed since those hot summer days in Columbia, S.C., when Duce Staley decided to test the resolve of Eagles coach Andy Reid. By staging a holdout from training camp, Staley lost more than $100,000 in fines and possibly some playing time. Five months later, the Eagles' most accomplished running back is convinced that when his team's playoff run is over, his career with the team will be over, too. "Will I be back? To be honest with you, no," Staley said as the Eagles prepared for today's NFC divisional playoff game against the Green Bay Packers.
NEWS
August 13, 1999 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
Mayor Rendell won't talk about the future of the Philadelphia Gas Commission. Democratic mayoral candidate John Street thinks talking about it diverts attention from bigger problems. And Sam Katz, the Republican mayoral nominee, says it's lost its function and will face serious difficulties in finding a new role. As the Philadelphia Gas Commission finished its second day of hearings on the proposed budget for the troubled Philadelphia Gas Works, the question was whether the commission's grilling of the company brass amounts to a swan song.
NEWS
May 17, 1996 | By Robert F. O'Neill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A lot of seasons have passed since Conestoga wagons dominated the highways and byways of Southeastern Pennsylvania, but George Fitzpatrick of Coventryville, who owns one, can't let history stand in his way. His Conestoga wagon, which proudly represented Pennsylvania in the nation's 1976 Bicentennial cross-country caravan, has a last shot at fame. It is entered in Sunday's commercial-class carriage parade at the Devon Horse Show. Fitzpatrick, 55, a retired Philadelphia mounted police officer, has won six ribbons in 11 years at the show with a variety of horse-drawn vehicles, but has never taken a first place.
NEWS
May 27, 1999 | By Erika Hobbs, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Now that he has broken his own rock climbing record, 81-year-old Gerry Bloch said he is ready to slow down. "This was my swan song," said the grandfather and retired chemical engineer, who scaled the 2,500-foot El Capitan in Yosemite National Park on Sunday. Bloch, who lives in Woodbury, topped a record he set 13 years ago as the oldest man to climb the Yosemite peak. "I have weakened perceptibly since my 81st birthday. There will be no next adventure," he said. Besides, his life insurance policy won't pay if he dies climbing or parachuting, his other favorite pastime.
NEWS
July 31, 1999 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As he has almost every day for the past 52 years, Joe Niagara, the DJ who taught a generation of Philadelphians to rock, walked into a radio studio yesterday afternoon and picked out a couple of tunes to play on the air. One of the songs he chose for his last shift at WPEN-AM (950) was Peggy Lee's "Listen to the Rockin' Bird," his theme more than 40 years ago at WIBG, the radio station everyone called "Wibbage," the one that played rock and roll. Although he refused to describe it as his retirement day, yesterday was special for Niagara, 72. It was the last time he would be heard in the afternoon drive shift at WPEN, where he's worked for 22 years.
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NEWS
January 6, 2016 | By Claudia Vargas, Staff Writer
The man who ran the City of Philadelphia for the last eight years delivered his final speech as mayor on Monday morning to a roomful of boys. Schoolboys, that is. With barely two hours remaining before his term in office ended, Mayor Nutter addressed nearly 900 students in the chapel of his alma mater, St. Joseph's Preparatory School. Nutter encouraged the young men at the Jesuit-run school on Girard Avenue to live a life of service. "I wanted my last public speech as mayor of this great city to be with this Prep community," said Nutter, a 1975 graduate.
NEWS
August 17, 2015 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
By the time Mötley Crüe bade farewell to Philadelphia Friday night, the Wells Fargo Center had seen rains of confetti, deafening pyrotechnics, multidirectional jets of flame (including a few shot from a weapons-grade bass guitar), burning pentagrams, scantily-clad dancers, crane arms flying band members high over the audience, and an entire drum kit spinning 360s on a roller-coaster track that extended nearly the length of the arena. Oh, yeah, there were also four aging rock stars plodding through ponderously loud odes to decadence.
NEWS
April 3, 2015 | BY BOB STEWART, Daily News Staff Writer stewarr@phillynews.com, 215-854-4890
A TESTY EXCHANGE between a judge and City Commissioner Stephanie Singer's lawyer led to a drawn-out reconsideration hearing yesterday on nomination petitions that would keep her on the Democratic primary ballot. Common Pleas Judge Joel Johnson ruled last week that Singer fell four names short of the required 1,000 signatures to be on the May 19 election ballot. Singer's counsel, Chuck Goodwin, saw it differently. In a large ceremonial courtroom at Family Court normally used for baby adoptions, about a half-dozen people sat through yesterday's continuation of the longest of the recent nomination-petition challenge cases.
BUSINESS
September 16, 2013 | By Art Carey, For The Inquirer
It was five years ago, when he published his seventh book, Enough: The True Measures of Money, Business, and Life , that it seemed Jack Bogle had produced his swan song - part autobiography, part jeremiad, part apologia - and that there wasn't much more to say. The founder of Vanguard, the Malvern-based mutual fund giant, Bogle underwent a heart transplant in 1996 and has continued, despite intermittent health problems, to live life with gusto...
SPORTS
December 21, 2012 | By Vegas Vic, For the Daily News
EAGLES (+6 1/2) over Redskins: Got a queasy feeling about the final home game for the Jolly Green Giant. On the one hand, it's a "win one for Andy" feel in the home finale and his last game ever as head Bird. On the other hand, we have five fingers, and five reasons why the Eagles will not win. Nick Foles, the offensive line, the entire defense, special teams, and, if healthy, RGIII. So, as you can see, Double V is conflicted. Are the five reasons enough to put me on Washington, or does the "win one for the moustache" trump everything?
SPORTS
May 10, 2012 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Columnist
HE FINISHED another postseason looking again like an old action figure, his limbs long misshapen from too much bending and wear, his effectiveness frayed by too many hits, too much dependence, too many years of doing this. Kimmo Timonen ends his latest postseason at 37 years old, a year left on his contract, the tread on his tires visibly worn. You have loved the guy for his smarts and for his fight, for being a guy who will play with a bad back, a bad knee, a bad shoulder, and still find a way to impact a game.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2011 | By Merilyn Jackson, For The Inquirer
Carbon Dance Theatre made its Philadelphia debut Thursday evening at the Performance Garage with Swan Songs , a serious contemporary ballet program that uses the final songs written by classical and contemporary artists just before their deaths. Carbon's founding artistic director, Meredith Rainey, invited Jaamil Olawale Kosoko, a master character developer and choreographer, "to take the edge off" in the pauses between the four works. In this program, he is Jeremiah, a seriously funny MC who reads poems (some his)
NEWS
October 24, 2011 | By Sam Adams, For The Inquirer
After a set that drew a standing ovation from the audience at the Keswick Theatre on Saturday night, the Jayhawks opened their encore with "Love Hurts," hewing closely to the immortal version by Gram Parsons and Emmylou Harris. It was a fairly obvious choice for a band credited as a formative influence on the alt-country movement, but it also summed up the 90-minute set's subtext. Led by Mark Olson and Gary Louris, who recently released Mockingbird Time , their first album under the Jayhawks banner in 16 years, they worked the terrain of melancholy romance with single-minded devotion.
NEWS
July 18, 2011 | By Jakob Dorof, For The Inquirer
Perhaps Simon Reynolds is right. In his new book Retromania , the British critic argues that pop culture has become addicted to its own recent past, and a gander at who's been playing this summer's Festival Pier concerts lends weight to his words. In recent weeks, the Penn's Landing stage has seen reunion tour performances from '90s bands such as indie rockers Guided by Voices and the Dismemberment Plan, as well as grunge-era giants Soundgarden. On Saturday night, A Perfect Circle was just another in a long line of nostalgic revivals.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2011
Those Darlins Those Darlins routinely get labeled as a cowpunk or alt-country band, but that's mainly because they hail from Tennessee and drop the"g" from the last word of their excellent name. Actually, darlin', what the fab foursome of front women Nikki, Jessi, and Kelley Darlin and drummer Linwood Regensburg are is a trashy garage rock band with more in common with Joan Jett and the Ramones than Dolly Parton. The Darlins' second full-length album, Screws Get Loose, expands the group's range from the stoner blues of "Mystic Mind" to the girl-group grabbiness of "Tina Said" and "Boy," and the songwriting quality is uniformly high throughout the tight, tough, 11-song set. Fellow Nashville garage band Natural Child are along for the ride.
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