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Swarthmore College

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NEWS
June 14, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The president of Swarthmore College stunned faculty and staff Thursday by announcing her resignation after five years on the job, a relatively short tenure at the highly regarded institution. Rebecca Chopp, a religion scholar, announced that she had accepted a job as chancellor of the University of Denver, beginning Sept. 1. The college announced that Constance Cain Hungerford, a former provost who has spent nearly four decades at Swarthmore, will step in as interim president beginning July 14. Swarthmore last year faced fierce criticism - and an inquiry by the U.S. Department of Education - over its handling of sexual assaults on campus.
NEWS
April 15, 1993 | By Claire Furia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Swarthmore College unveiled plans before the Borough Council Monday night for what officials called a multimillion-dollar renovation and construction project on the campus. Architect Margaret Helfand presented three variations of the plan, which school officials said included improvements to the social sciences building and construction of a 35,000-square-foot building that would house some academic departments, classrooms and a faculty lounge. The plan also would reroute vehicles around the perimeter of the campus to make the heart of the campus more pedestrian, said Larry Schall, vice president for facilities and planning for the college.
NEWS
February 3, 1991 | By Mary Anne Janco, Special to The Inquirer
An incident involving nearly two dozen skinheads, some armed with knives and clubs, and an attack on a 15-year-old boy have prompted police and security forces to beef up patrols in and around Swarthmore College. "We're not going to let skinheads congregate in Swarthmore," said Mayor Guy Smith. "They're not going to start harming people. We are going to beef up nighttime patrols so we are on top of this. " Security officers and local police rounded up a disorderly group of skinheads on campus Jan. 26 without violence, according to Owen Redgrave, head of campus security.
NEWS
May 11, 1990 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
David Fraser, the president of Swarthmore College for the last eight years, will step down from his post at the liberal arts school in August 1991, school officials said yesterday. Fraser, 46, a physician who is credited with heading a team of researchers who discovered the cause of Legionnaires' disease, said he had already been at Swarthmore three years longer than he intended. "I suspect that I have given to Swarthmore what I have to give," he said. Fraser said he missed the practice of medicine and public health, but had no plans to return to a specific job in those fields.
NEWS
August 24, 1989 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
William Spock, senior vice president of Corroon & Black/Noyes Services insurance firm in Media, has been named vice president for business and finance at Swarthmore College. Spock will oversee nonacademic departments of the college and investment of Swarthmore's endowment portfolio, valued at about $280 million. Spock, of Wallingford, is a Swarthmore graduate and is on the school's board of managers. At Corroon & Black/Noyes Services, Spock is responsible for overseeing the personal property and casualty department, the life and benefits department and administrative operations.
NEWS
February 21, 1991 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Swarthmore College, widely regarded as one of the nation's leading private liberal arts schools, is expected to name Alfred H. Bloom, a linguist who is fluent in French, Spanish and Mandarin Chinese, as its new president. School officials said yesterday that Bloom's name would be submitted to the Swarthmore board for approval on March 2. He was recommended by a school committee after a nationwide search that considered 600 names. Bloom, 44, is now executive vice president and dean of the faculty at Pitzer College in Claremont, Calif.
NEWS
August 16, 1990 | By Marigloria Sierra, Special to The Inquirer
They met at a school party during the first week of classes. She was a freshman, and he a senior. First, he asked her to dance. Then they went outside, and finally he said, "You wanna go out to my dorm and hang out, have some coffee?" Debbie agreed. After 10 minutes of small talk seated on the bed, Bryan touched her hair and started kissing her. She responded, but wanted to go no further. "Bryan, please don't. " He ignored her. "Just close your eyes. " "I'm not really sure about this.
NEWS
June 9, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Swarthmore College alumni of decades past and present, it was time to give back to a place that transformed them. Don Mizell, 65, Class of 1971, donated his 2005 Grammy for Album of the Year, produced for Ray Charles, to the school's Black Cultural Center, which he pushed to get built as an anthropology student. "This is an outgrowth of my experience here," he said Saturday as he attended an alumni reunion event. "It's an act of gratitude and me saying, 'This [Grammy] exists because of you.' " Imitation is the best homage for Juan Victor Fajardo, 27, Class of 2009.
NEWS
May 12, 2005 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gilmore Stott, 91, of Swarthmore, a Swarthmore College administrator and teacher who was a mentor to generations of students, died of a heart attack May 4 at Springfield Hospital. In 1950, Dr. Stott was appointed assistant dean of men at Swarthmore. For the next 35 years, he held various positions, including director of financial aid, registrar, associate provost, and special assistant to the president. He also taught philosophy and a popular course on ethics. For years he chaired the college's Upward Bound Program, which helps low-income high school students prepare for college.
NEWS
May 24, 2013 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A women's-rights lawyer said Wednesday that federal suits had been filed against several U.S. colleges, including Swarthmore College, alleging that the schools did not properly handle students' sexual-assault allegations. Two other complaints making similar claims were filed against Swarthmore last month. It was not immediately clear how many of the suits filed Wednesday were against Swarthmore. The complaints are not public, according to Gloria Allred, but they allege that the schools - Swarthmore, Dartmouth College, the University of North Carolina, the University of Southern California, and the University of California at Berkeley - did not comply with Title IX or the Clery Act. Title IX, commonly known as a law related to women's sports, also contains civil rights requirements.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 18, 2016 | Edith Newhall, For the Inquirer
A number of new and not-so-new galleries have been hitting their stride this year. If they have one thing in common, it's their compact size. The small white box (or rectangle) gallery model of the late 1960s is back. Queen Village's Paradigm Gallery + Studio and Jed Williams Gallery; the Callowhill district's Savery Gallery; Fjord Gallery, a recent transplant to Kensington's Crane Arts building; Mount Airy Contemporary; James Oliver Gallery on Chestnut Street; Cerulean Arts on Ridge Avenue near Broad Street; and Lord Ludd, in the heart of Old City, on Market Street - all deserve to be on any contemporary-art follower's must-see list.
NEWS
September 9, 2016
ISSUE | COLLEGE An 'F' for Swarthmore Life itself is the school of hard knocks. Delaying the experience, as Swarthmore College does for its freshmen, works to deny our youth the most valuable of lessons ("1st semester, no grades," Tuesday). In creating a faux-world for new students, Swarthmore's take-a-pass freshman offerings reek of the kind of political correctness that produces citizens fearful of everything. |Avrum Fine, West Chester, filmamerica@comcast.net
NEWS
September 7, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Emma Morgan-Bennett isn't sure whether she wants a career in the humanities or the hard sciences, or a piece of both. So the Swarthmore College freshman decided to use her first semester to explore. She'll take biology, introduction to education, and Spanish. Oh, and costume design. "Because, why not?" said Morgan-Bennett, 18, of New York City. It's the kind of academic comfort and freedom that Swarthmore tries to encourage by having all first-semester freshmen take their classes pass/fail - or credit/no credit, as Swarthmore likes to call it. Under the policy, professors share grades with students so they know how they did, but no A, B, C or D ever appears on an official transcript.
NEWS
August 14, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Joe McGinniss Jr. tells intense, rapid-fire stories about an America that seems permanently down on its luck. The novelist, who grew up in Swarthmore, made his literary debut with 2008's The Delivery Man , about a trio of young Las Vegas natives who get sucked into criminality. Its searing portrait of a lost generation earned it comparisons to Bret Easton Ellis' Less Than Zero . McGinniss' sophomore effort, Carousel Court , is about the toll the foreclosure crisis takes on a young Southern California couple.
NEWS
August 1, 2016 | By Kathy Boccella, Staff Writer
High school students in the Lower Merion School District will be catching a bit of a break this coming year: It will be easier to ace tests, and not as easy to flunk them. Under a new grading policy, a score of 90 will be enough for an A, down from the traditional cutoff of 92. At the other end of the measuring stick, a failing grade now will be 59 and under, instead of 64. What's behind the grade-point pick-me-up? Some Lower Merion parents complained that the decades-old system of eight points per letter grade - falling out of favor nationwide as districts adopt the more forgiving 10-point scale - could cast their children in an unfair comparative light when they apply for colleges and merit scholarships.
NEWS
July 30, 2016
ISSUE | TURKEY A model Muslim Fethullah Gulen, the Turkish Islamic reformer, and Hizmet, the service organization he inspires, are being called out as "savages" who should be purged "by the roots" because the Turkish government regards them as responsible for the attempted coup d'├ętat on July 15. I know many members of the Hizmet movement, also called Gulenists, and they are gracious, thoughtful, and family-oriented. In 2015, Morehouse College in Atlanta awarded its prestigious Gandhi King Ikeda Peace Award to Gulen for his lifelong commitment to peace among nations and promotion of interfaith dialogue.
NEWS
July 24, 2016
Answers: 1. B. Victoria Woodhull 2. A. Seneca Falls Convention, 1848 3. C. 19th Amendment, 1920 4. D. Alice Paul 5. C. Hilary Swank, Iron Jawed Angels 6. C. Lawyer 7. A. Wyoming 8. D. Swarthmore 9. A. Frederick Douglass 10. B. Woodrow Wilson 1. Who was the first woman to run for president? A. Belva Lockwood B. Victoria Woodhull C. Shirley Chisholm D. Susan B. Anthony 2. What was the first women's rights convention called and when was it held?
NEWS
July 9, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, STAFF WRITER
Swarthmore College again beat out the University of Pennsylvania in a Forbes annual ranking of top U.S. colleges. In the magazine's 2016 ranking of the nation's top colleges and universities, Swarthmore came in at No. 10 and Penn at No. 11. The only other Pennsylvania school to come in the top 25 was Haverford College, at No. 23. Stanford University topped all at No. 1, Williams College came in at No. 2, Princeton University at No....
NEWS
June 4, 2016 | By Kathy Boccella, Staff Writer
In the eight years since its founding by the director of a popular children's chorus, the Chester Charter School for the Arts has hit an academic high note as the top-performing school in Delaware County's poorest community. Soon, it will move from a rental space in an industrial park - where young musicians, dancers, and artists hone their skills against the rumble of potato-chip trucks rolling out of a neighboring warehouse - and into a venue more in tune with the school's success.
BUSINESS
May 28, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
SEPTA approved a contract Thursday that will bring more than 500 new buses to the city by 2021. The $411.8 million, five-year contract with New Flyer of America, of Winnipeg, Canada, will pay for 525 diesel-electric hybrid buses. The buses will begin arriving next year, SEPTA officials said, and in five years 95 percent of the agency's bus fleet will be made up of hybrid vehicles. SEPTA's board voted for the contract at its monthly meeting Thursday. At the same meeting it approved the fiscal year 2017 $1.4 billion operating budget, a 3 percent increase over the prior year.
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