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Swarthmore College

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NEWS
June 14, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The president of Swarthmore College stunned faculty and staff Thursday by announcing her resignation after five years on the job, a relatively short tenure at the highly regarded institution. Rebecca Chopp, a religion scholar, announced that she had accepted a job as chancellor of the University of Denver, beginning Sept. 1. The college announced that Constance Cain Hungerford, a former provost who has spent nearly four decades at Swarthmore, will step in as interim president beginning July 14. Swarthmore last year faced fierce criticism - and an inquiry by the U.S. Department of Education - over its handling of sexual assaults on campus.
NEWS
April 15, 1993 | By Claire Furia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Swarthmore College unveiled plans before the Borough Council Monday night for what officials called a multimillion-dollar renovation and construction project on the campus. Architect Margaret Helfand presented three variations of the plan, which school officials said included improvements to the social sciences building and construction of a 35,000-square-foot building that would house some academic departments, classrooms and a faculty lounge. The plan also would reroute vehicles around the perimeter of the campus to make the heart of the campus more pedestrian, said Larry Schall, vice president for facilities and planning for the college.
NEWS
February 3, 1991 | By Mary Anne Janco, Special to The Inquirer
An incident involving nearly two dozen skinheads, some armed with knives and clubs, and an attack on a 15-year-old boy have prompted police and security forces to beef up patrols in and around Swarthmore College. "We're not going to let skinheads congregate in Swarthmore," said Mayor Guy Smith. "They're not going to start harming people. We are going to beef up nighttime patrols so we are on top of this. " Security officers and local police rounded up a disorderly group of skinheads on campus Jan. 26 without violence, according to Owen Redgrave, head of campus security.
NEWS
May 11, 1990 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
David Fraser, the president of Swarthmore College for the last eight years, will step down from his post at the liberal arts school in August 1991, school officials said yesterday. Fraser, 46, a physician who is credited with heading a team of researchers who discovered the cause of Legionnaires' disease, said he had already been at Swarthmore three years longer than he intended. "I suspect that I have given to Swarthmore what I have to give," he said. Fraser said he missed the practice of medicine and public health, but had no plans to return to a specific job in those fields.
NEWS
August 24, 1989 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
William Spock, senior vice president of Corroon & Black/Noyes Services insurance firm in Media, has been named vice president for business and finance at Swarthmore College. Spock will oversee nonacademic departments of the college and investment of Swarthmore's endowment portfolio, valued at about $280 million. Spock, of Wallingford, is a Swarthmore graduate and is on the school's board of managers. At Corroon & Black/Noyes Services, Spock is responsible for overseeing the personal property and casualty department, the life and benefits department and administrative operations.
NEWS
June 9, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Swarthmore College alumni of decades past and present, it was time to give back to a place that transformed them. Don Mizell, 65, Class of 1971, donated his 2005 Grammy for Album of the Year, produced for Ray Charles, to the school's Black Cultural Center, which he pushed to get built as an anthropology student. "This is an outgrowth of my experience here," he said Saturday as he attended an alumni reunion event. "It's an act of gratitude and me saying, 'This [Grammy] exists because of you.' " Imitation is the best homage for Juan Victor Fajardo, 27, Class of 2009.
NEWS
February 21, 1991 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Swarthmore College, widely regarded as one of the nation's leading private liberal arts schools, is expected to name Alfred H. Bloom, a linguist who is fluent in French, Spanish and Mandarin Chinese, as its new president. School officials said yesterday that Bloom's name would be submitted to the Swarthmore board for approval on March 2. He was recommended by a school committee after a nationwide search that considered 600 names. Bloom, 44, is now executive vice president and dean of the faculty at Pitzer College in Claremont, Calif.
NEWS
August 16, 1990 | By Marigloria Sierra, Special to The Inquirer
They met at a school party during the first week of classes. She was a freshman, and he a senior. First, he asked her to dance. Then they went outside, and finally he said, "You wanna go out to my dorm and hang out, have some coffee?" Debbie agreed. After 10 minutes of small talk seated on the bed, Bryan touched her hair and started kissing her. She responded, but wanted to go no further. "Bryan, please don't. " He ignored her. "Just close your eyes. " "I'm not really sure about this.
NEWS
May 12, 2005 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gilmore Stott, 91, of Swarthmore, a Swarthmore College administrator and teacher who was a mentor to generations of students, died of a heart attack May 4 at Springfield Hospital. In 1950, Dr. Stott was appointed assistant dean of men at Swarthmore. For the next 35 years, he held various positions, including director of financial aid, registrar, associate provost, and special assistant to the president. He also taught philosophy and a popular course on ethics. For years he chaired the college's Upward Bound Program, which helps low-income high school students prepare for college.
NEWS
August 28, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
After years of planning, Swarthmore College is beginning construction of an inn, bookstore, and roundabout. The project will result in traffic changes along Route 320, and the inn will bring the first liquor license to an otherwise-dry Delaware County borough. Borough and college officials say the development, which has been planned for more than 15 years, will improve a dangerous intersection and connect the college to its community. The project's opponents, however, have not given up. Even as construction crews begin work on the roundabout this week, residents opposed to it are planning to file an appeal in court.
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NEWS
August 28, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
After years of planning, Swarthmore College is beginning construction of an inn, bookstore, and roundabout. The project will result in traffic changes along Route 320, and the inn will bring the first liquor license to an otherwise-dry Delaware County borough. Borough and college officials say the development, which has been planned for more than 15 years, will improve a dangerous intersection and connect the college to its community. The project's opponents, however, have not given up. Even as construction crews begin work on the roundabout this week, residents opposed to it are planning to file an appeal in court.
NEWS
August 3, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
How does an idea - a way to do something, learn something, make connections or community - become an app? This is the story of Spotlight ( www.spotlight.is ), a social media app that went live on the Apple Store and Android on Friday. It's roughly a two-year-long arc from patent (August 2012) to thing (August 2014). (Full disclosure: Since October, the developer of Spotlight - a little start-up called VUID Inc. - has had offices in the same building as The Inquirer. Interstate General Media, which owns the newspaper, is providing office space and staff support to promising start-ups as part of the Project Liberty Digital Incubator.)
NEWS
July 21, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Under pressure for its handling of sexual-assault cases, Swarthmore College turned to an outsider to oversee them: a retired Pennsylvania Supreme Court justice. The college last fall hired Jane Greenspan, who has decades of experience as a trial and appeals judge and who now works as a professional mediator and arbitrator. "They wanted a neutral person, not connected to the college or the students," Greenspan said. "I just listen to them and try to make the correct decision, as I would in any arbitration.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
William H. Frederick Jr., known as Bill, is 88 now, a little stooped and hard of hearing, a far hike down the road from his 1948 Swarthmore College graduation. But this accomplished garden designer, nurseryman, and author remains an icon in plant circles. Since the 1960s, he has shared his expertise and extraordinary 17-acre garden outside Wilmington with 33 interns and thousands of professional gardeners, landscape architects, and students from around the world. Now, there's a good deed that cannot trump Frederick's half-century of knowledge-sharing, but certainly tops it off nicely: an $800,000 gift to Scott Arboretum, which covers 300 acres of Swarthmore's 450-acre campus.
NEWS
June 14, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The president of Swarthmore College stunned faculty and staff Thursday by announcing her resignation after five years on the job, a relatively short tenure at the highly regarded institution. Rebecca Chopp, a religion scholar, announced that she had accepted a job as chancellor of the University of Denver, beginning Sept. 1. The college announced that Constance Cain Hungerford, a former provost who has spent nearly four decades at Swarthmore, will step in as interim president beginning July 14. Swarthmore last year faced fierce criticism - and an inquiry by the U.S. Department of Education - over its handling of sexual assaults on campus.
NEWS
June 9, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Swarthmore College alumni of decades past and present, it was time to give back to a place that transformed them. Don Mizell, 65, Class of 1971, donated his 2005 Grammy for Album of the Year, produced for Ray Charles, to the school's Black Cultural Center, which he pushed to get built as an anthropology student. "This is an outgrowth of my experience here," he said Saturday as he attended an alumni reunion event. "It's an act of gratitude and me saying, 'This [Grammy] exists because of you.' " Imitation is the best homage for Juan Victor Fajardo, 27, Class of 2009.
NEWS
May 9, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
HAVERFORD Leafy Haverford College suddenly finds it has a commencement-speaker controversy, too - and less than 10 days to sort things out. It started when the college invited Robert J. Birgeneau, former chancellor of the University of California, Berkeley, to speak and receive an honorary degree at the May 18 ceremony. Birgeneau is known for his support of undocumented and minority students, but became controversial in 2011 when university police used force on students protesting the financial handling of the state's higher education system.
NEWS
May 3, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Five area colleges are among 55 nationwide being investigated by the U.S. Department of Education for possible mishandling of sexual assault and harassment cases. Temple University, Pennsylvania State University, Princeton University, Swarthmore College, and Franklin and Marshall College are on the first-of-its-kind list, released Thursday. The investigations are looking for possible violations of Title IX, the federal law that prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex. Officials declined to release details of the investigations.
NEWS
May 2, 2014
As reports of colleges' failure to deal with sexual assault have drawn attention to campuses from Swarthmore to Berkeley and Penn State to Florida State, it's become clear that the problem afflicts higher education at large. The White House and others are beginning to respond accordingly. The first report of a White House task force on the issue this week noted the astonishing finding that, according to a 2007 report for the National Institute of Justice, nearly one in five female students suffers an attempted or actual sexual assault during college.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
By the time she was 6, Swarthmore novelist Rachel Pastan knew she would become a writer. Her decision wasn't the result of a blinding artistic epiphany: Nothing seemed more natural for Pastan, who grew up watching her mother, acclaimed Maryland poet Linda Pastan, sit for hours every day at her IBM Selectric. For Rachel, her future simply was a matter of entering "the family business. " And so she did. Pastan, 48, recently wrapped up a book tour for her third novel, Alena , a story about the art world told through a unique, clever reworking of Daphne du Maurier's famous Gothic romance Rebecca . The writing life came easily for the young Pastan.
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