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Swarthmore College

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NEWS
June 14, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The president of Swarthmore College stunned faculty and staff Thursday by announcing her resignation after five years on the job, a relatively short tenure at the highly regarded institution. Rebecca Chopp, a religion scholar, announced that she had accepted a job as chancellor of the University of Denver, beginning Sept. 1. The college announced that Constance Cain Hungerford, a former provost who has spent nearly four decades at Swarthmore, will step in as interim president beginning July 14. Swarthmore last year faced fierce criticism - and an inquiry by the U.S. Department of Education - over its handling of sexual assaults on campus.
NEWS
April 15, 1993 | By Claire Furia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Swarthmore College unveiled plans before the Borough Council Monday night for what officials called a multimillion-dollar renovation and construction project on the campus. Architect Margaret Helfand presented three variations of the plan, which school officials said included improvements to the social sciences building and construction of a 35,000-square-foot building that would house some academic departments, classrooms and a faculty lounge. The plan also would reroute vehicles around the perimeter of the campus to make the heart of the campus more pedestrian, said Larry Schall, vice president for facilities and planning for the college.
NEWS
February 3, 1991 | By Mary Anne Janco, Special to The Inquirer
An incident involving nearly two dozen skinheads, some armed with knives and clubs, and an attack on a 15-year-old boy have prompted police and security forces to beef up patrols in and around Swarthmore College. "We're not going to let skinheads congregate in Swarthmore," said Mayor Guy Smith. "They're not going to start harming people. We are going to beef up nighttime patrols so we are on top of this. " Security officers and local police rounded up a disorderly group of skinheads on campus Jan. 26 without violence, according to Owen Redgrave, head of campus security.
NEWS
May 11, 1990 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
David Fraser, the president of Swarthmore College for the last eight years, will step down from his post at the liberal arts school in August 1991, school officials said yesterday. Fraser, 46, a physician who is credited with heading a team of researchers who discovered the cause of Legionnaires' disease, said he had already been at Swarthmore three years longer than he intended. "I suspect that I have given to Swarthmore what I have to give," he said. Fraser said he missed the practice of medicine and public health, but had no plans to return to a specific job in those fields.
NEWS
August 24, 1989 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
William Spock, senior vice president of Corroon & Black/Noyes Services insurance firm in Media, has been named vice president for business and finance at Swarthmore College. Spock will oversee nonacademic departments of the college and investment of Swarthmore's endowment portfolio, valued at about $280 million. Spock, of Wallingford, is a Swarthmore graduate and is on the school's board of managers. At Corroon & Black/Noyes Services, Spock is responsible for overseeing the personal property and casualty department, the life and benefits department and administrative operations.
NEWS
February 21, 1991 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Swarthmore College, widely regarded as one of the nation's leading private liberal arts schools, is expected to name Alfred H. Bloom, a linguist who is fluent in French, Spanish and Mandarin Chinese, as its new president. School officials said yesterday that Bloom's name would be submitted to the Swarthmore board for approval on March 2. He was recommended by a school committee after a nationwide search that considered 600 names. Bloom, 44, is now executive vice president and dean of the faculty at Pitzer College in Claremont, Calif.
NEWS
August 16, 1990 | By Marigloria Sierra, Special to The Inquirer
They met at a school party during the first week of classes. She was a freshman, and he a senior. First, he asked her to dance. Then they went outside, and finally he said, "You wanna go out to my dorm and hang out, have some coffee?" Debbie agreed. After 10 minutes of small talk seated on the bed, Bryan touched her hair and started kissing her. She responded, but wanted to go no further. "Bryan, please don't. " He ignored her. "Just close your eyes. " "I'm not really sure about this.
NEWS
June 9, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Swarthmore College alumni of decades past and present, it was time to give back to a place that transformed them. Don Mizell, 65, Class of 1971, donated his 2005 Grammy for Album of the Year, produced for Ray Charles, to the school's Black Cultural Center, which he pushed to get built as an anthropology student. "This is an outgrowth of my experience here," he said Saturday as he attended an alumni reunion event. "It's an act of gratitude and me saying, 'This [Grammy] exists because of you.' " Imitation is the best homage for Juan Victor Fajardo, 27, Class of 2009.
NEWS
May 12, 2005 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gilmore Stott, 91, of Swarthmore, a Swarthmore College administrator and teacher who was a mentor to generations of students, died of a heart attack May 4 at Springfield Hospital. In 1950, Dr. Stott was appointed assistant dean of men at Swarthmore. For the next 35 years, he held various positions, including director of financial aid, registrar, associate provost, and special assistant to the president. He also taught philosophy and a popular course on ethics. For years he chaired the college's Upward Bound Program, which helps low-income high school students prepare for college.
NEWS
May 24, 2013 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A women's-rights lawyer said Wednesday that federal suits had been filed against several U.S. colleges, including Swarthmore College, alleging that the schools did not properly handle students' sexual-assault allegations. Two other complaints making similar claims were filed against Swarthmore last month. It was not immediately clear how many of the suits filed Wednesday were against Swarthmore. The complaints are not public, according to Gloria Allred, but they allege that the schools - Swarthmore, Dartmouth College, the University of North Carolina, the University of Southern California, and the University of California at Berkeley - did not comply with Title IX or the Clery Act. Title IX, commonly known as a law related to women's sports, also contains civil rights requirements.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 1, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
A memorial service will be held Saturday, April 30, for Lewis N. Rinko, 81, of Swarthmore, a former advertising agency executive, a Girard College alumnus, and a former publisher of his hometown weekly, the Swarthmorean. Mr. Rinko died Tuesday, April 5, of heart failure at home. Born in coal country near Wilkes-Barre, he was 8 when his father died in a mining accident. Hoping to increase his chances for a better life, his mother in 1944 took him by bus to Girard and left him there.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2016
Delaware Valley Regional Daffodil Show Show & cultivar sale. Jenkins Arboretum, 631 Berwyn Baptist Rd., Devon. www.daffodilusa.org . 4/16. Gardening with Native Plants for Urban Pollinators Learn how to use native plants to attract beneficial pollinating insects to your garden. Greensgrow Farms, 2501 E. Cumberland St. $35, includes $25 gift card. 4/16. Noon-2 pm. Greater Woodbury Garden Club Monthly meeting featuring a presentation, "Hostas for Garden Texture. " Central Baptist Church, 37 S. Jackson St., Woodbury; 856-904-6870.
NEWS
March 20, 2016 | By Justine McDaniel, Staff Writer
Having more choices can actually be a bad thing, says the research that changed psychologist Barry Schwartz's life, earning his TED Talk millions of views and turning him into someone "people all over the world . . . associate with a single important idea. " And coincidentally, Schwartz, who is preparing to retire from Swarthmore College, has made an illustrious career by sticking to just a few good choices. He's been a professor at Swarthmore for 45 years - the only job he ever applied for, he said.
NEWS
March 10, 2016
ISSUE | COLLEGE COSTS Aid lowers the tab The "sticker price" is not the actual cost of attendance for most students at colleges such as Swarthmore ("Can't afford the tuition," Friday). Swarthmore's average financial-aid award last year for more than half our students was $47,255, making the average cost of attendance $16,705 for those receiving need-based financial aid. Families need to look beyond sticker price when weighing their options for college and consider first the best fit for the student.
NEWS
February 26, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Swarthmore College, the epicenter of student protest last year over investment in fossil fuels, has budgeted $300,000 as part of an ongoing commitment to improve energy conservation on campus. The college's board of managers, at its meeting last weekend, approved the expenditure as part of a $160 million budget. Swarthmore drew national attention last spring when students staged a 32-day sit-in to try to persuade the board to divest fossil fuels from its endowment portfolio. The board voted last May not to divest any of its $1.9 billion endowment, citing investment guidelines that call for "the endowment to yield the best long-term financial results, rather than to pursue other social objectives.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
Expectations turned upside down at the debut concert of First Editions Chamber Orchestra, newly formed by James Freeman, the man who retired from Orchestra 2001 after 27 years, but who hardly seems through with the new-music business. Premieres by Cynthia Folio and Heidi Jacobs were on Sunday's concert in Lang Concert Hall at Swarthmore College (repeated Friday in Roberts Hall at Haverford College). But another part of the ensemble's mandate is performing early Mozart. That can be mistaken for a charming act of niche shopping.
BUSINESS
February 1, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, Staff Writer
Philadelphia University president Stephen Spinelli Jr. describes the decision to become part of Thomas Jefferson University as proactive, not defensive. The merger "makes us stronger. Neither of us needed to merge," Spinelli said this month at an East Falls community meeting. But Spinelli did not gloss over the underlying economic forces confounding some colleges and contributing to his board's decision to let the 132-year-old school be taken over by Jefferson. Asked by an East Falls resident about the merger's impact on staff and faculty jobs, Spinelli said: "They are probably more assured of a position with this than they would be without it. " As his comments suggest, the future could be bleak for some small schools, as the number of high school graduates stagnates and resistance to borrowing for ever-higher tuition bills grows.
NEWS
December 9, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bill Cosby has lost another honor. Swarthmore College's board of managers voted Saturday to rescind an honorary degree in humane letters that the college awarded to the entertainer in 1995. College President Valerie Smith announced the decision Monday. "Mr. Cosby has testified in a deposition under oath, which was made public in July, that he routinely and premeditatively drugged women before having sex with them," wrote Smith, who became president this year of Swarthmore, one of the nation's highly selective colleges.
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