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Swarthmore College

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NEWS
April 15, 1993 | By Claire Furia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Swarthmore College unveiled plans before the Borough Council Monday night for what officials called a multimillion-dollar renovation and construction project on the campus. Architect Margaret Helfand presented three variations of the plan, which school officials said included improvements to the social sciences building and construction of a 35,000-square-foot building that would house some academic departments, classrooms and a faculty lounge. The plan also would reroute vehicles around the perimeter of the campus to make the heart of the campus more pedestrian, said Larry Schall, vice president for facilities and planning for the college.
NEWS
February 3, 1991 | By Mary Anne Janco, Special to The Inquirer
An incident involving nearly two dozen skinheads, some armed with knives and clubs, and an attack on a 15-year-old boy have prompted police and security forces to beef up patrols in and around Swarthmore College. "We're not going to let skinheads congregate in Swarthmore," said Mayor Guy Smith. "They're not going to start harming people. We are going to beef up nighttime patrols so we are on top of this. " Security officers and local police rounded up a disorderly group of skinheads on campus Jan. 26 without violence, according to Owen Redgrave, head of campus security.
NEWS
May 11, 1990 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
David Fraser, the president of Swarthmore College for the last eight years, will step down from his post at the liberal arts school in August 1991, school officials said yesterday. Fraser, 46, a physician who is credited with heading a team of researchers who discovered the cause of Legionnaires' disease, said he had already been at Swarthmore three years longer than he intended. "I suspect that I have given to Swarthmore what I have to give," he said. Fraser said he missed the practice of medicine and public health, but had no plans to return to a specific job in those fields.
NEWS
August 24, 1989 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
William Spock, senior vice president of Corroon & Black/Noyes Services insurance firm in Media, has been named vice president for business and finance at Swarthmore College. Spock will oversee nonacademic departments of the college and investment of Swarthmore's endowment portfolio, valued at about $280 million. Spock, of Wallingford, is a Swarthmore graduate and is on the school's board of managers. At Corroon & Black/Noyes Services, Spock is responsible for overseeing the personal property and casualty department, the life and benefits department and administrative operations.
NEWS
February 21, 1991 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Swarthmore College, widely regarded as one of the nation's leading private liberal arts schools, is expected to name Alfred H. Bloom, a linguist who is fluent in French, Spanish and Mandarin Chinese, as its new president. School officials said yesterday that Bloom's name would be submitted to the Swarthmore board for approval on March 2. He was recommended by a school committee after a nationwide search that considered 600 names. Bloom, 44, is now executive vice president and dean of the faculty at Pitzer College in Claremont, Calif.
NEWS
August 16, 1990 | By Marigloria Sierra, Special to The Inquirer
They met at a school party during the first week of classes. She was a freshman, and he a senior. First, he asked her to dance. Then they went outside, and finally he said, "You wanna go out to my dorm and hang out, have some coffee?" Debbie agreed. After 10 minutes of small talk seated on the bed, Bryan touched her hair and started kissing her. She responded, but wanted to go no further. "Bryan, please don't. " He ignored her. "Just close your eyes. " "I'm not really sure about this.
NEWS
May 12, 2005 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gilmore Stott, 91, of Swarthmore, a Swarthmore College administrator and teacher who was a mentor to generations of students, died of a heart attack May 4 at Springfield Hospital. In 1950, Dr. Stott was appointed assistant dean of men at Swarthmore. For the next 35 years, he held various positions, including director of financial aid, registrar, associate provost, and special assistant to the president. He also taught philosophy and a popular course on ethics. For years he chaired the college's Upward Bound Program, which helps low-income high school students prepare for college.
NEWS
May 24, 2013 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A women's-rights lawyer said Wednesday that federal suits had been filed against several U.S. colleges, including Swarthmore College, alleging that the schools did not properly handle students' sexual-assault allegations. Two other complaints making similar claims were filed against Swarthmore last month. It was not immediately clear how many of the suits filed Wednesday were against Swarthmore. The complaints are not public, according to Gloria Allred, but they allege that the schools - Swarthmore, Dartmouth College, the University of North Carolina, the University of Southern California, and the University of California at Berkeley - did not comply with Title IX or the Clery Act. Title IX, commonly known as a law related to women's sports, also contains civil rights requirements.
NEWS
April 25, 1997 | By Monica Yant, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As a high school student during the Depression, Eugene M. Lang wanted to be a social worker. His principal suggested business instead; that way, the more money Lang made, the more people he could help. Lang went on to make a fortune. Yesterday, the 78-year-old New York businessman gave much of it away: $30 million in an unrestricted gift to his alma mater, Swarthmore College. He said the money would likely be used for community-service projects, "something to make this a better world.
NEWS
April 29, 1999 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
Swarthmore College, in angst over the Christian wording on its diploma, unintentionally begs the eternal question: What year is this, anyway? On the Jewish calendar, it's 5759, although Jews are happy to call it 1999 C.E. - but never 1999 A.D. At the University of Pennsylvania, the Latin on the diploma translates as, "in the year of grace of 1999. " What "grace" refers to is anybody's guess. For Muslims, this is 1420 in the year of the hejira, counting to the migration of the prophet Muhammad from Mecca to Medina in 622 C.E. (which only adds up if you count the shorter lunar years)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 5, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
He has been called a villain. Robotic. A mad genius. A hero. This for an even-tempered Swarthmore College graduate who was perhaps most known on campus for wearing shorts in the dead of winter? One point is not in dispute about Arthur Chu, 30. He is very, very good at the game show Jeopardy! After winning just nine games, he is already third on the show's all-time list of money winners, not counting those who have won special tournaments. With his win in the show that aired at 7 p.m. Friday on 6ABC, his total now stands at $261,000, thanks in part to an attacking style that can throw competitors off-balance.
NEWS
February 14, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
BRYN MAWR Kimberly Wright Cassidy, interim president of Bryn Mawr College since July 2013, was named to the permanent post Wednesday, the college announced. Cassidy, 50, an expert in psychology, is a native of Elverson, Chester County, and has spent her entire career at Bryn Mawr. She joined the faculty at the women's college in 1993 and served as provost for six years before stepping into the interim presidency. Cassidy replaces Jane McAuliffe, who stepped down in June after five years, the shortest presidential tenure in the college's history.
NEWS
February 1, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
SWARTHMORE Swarthmore College has made - or is working on - virtually every recommendation from an outside consultant to improve its handling of sexual assaults on campus, college officials said Thursday. The college released a final report from Margolis, Healy & Associates that showed Swarthmore had brought on additional staff, provided training for employees, and adopted an interim policy on the handling of sexual assault and harassment complaints. All are recommendations highlighted in an interim report by the consultant last summer.
REAL_ESTATE
January 13, 2014 | By Diane M. Fiske, For The Inquirer
  Susan and Robert Smythe are an articulate couple who seem to enjoy animated discussions. Robert, who teaches in the theater department at Temple University, was the director of Mum Puppettheatre in Old City for 25 years, until it closed in 2008. Susan, who was general manager of the theater, now is a projects manager for Swarthmore College. So they're happy to talk about the way a new, 300-square-foot home workshop has changed their lives. Constructed in 2012 behind their 1,900-square-foot Arts and Crafts-style house in Swarthmore, the workshop replaces an old garage that was never used for cars.
NEWS
December 22, 2013
In a Dec. 14 article on the Hillel chapter at Swarthmore College, a national spokesman for Hillel said members of Students for Justice in Palestine, a national pro-Palestinian group, have in the past plastered eviction notices on dorm rooms of Jewish and other students. The spokesman was not referring to any incident at Swarthmore College. A separate group mentioned in the story, Swarthmore Students for Peace and Justice in Palestine, said it has no affiliation with the national group and does not condone such acts.
NEWS
December 15, 2013 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jewish students at Swarthmore College have become the first in the nation to break with the global student association Hillel and agree to open their doors to groups and speakers who do not support Israel. The Swarthmore student board unanimously voted to renounce Hillel International's restrictions, which bar chapters from sponsoring events, hosting speakers, or partnering with groups that oppose Israel's right to exist or support a movement for universities to end investments in Israel because of its policies toward the Palestinians.
NEWS
December 11, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
As higher education comes under increased pressure to prove its worth, two local college presidents argue in a new book that the liberal arts play a vital role in educating the world's leaders and problem-solvers. While many colleges are aimed at preparing students for a profession or career, liberal arts colleges develop critical thinkers who are able to cross disciplines, said Daniel H. Weiss, president of Haverford College, one of the nation's most highly selective and expensive small liberal arts colleges.
REAL_ESTATE
December 1, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Sometimes, national surveys seem to have little meaning locally, leaving one to wonder why the numbers-crunchers bothered to pass the information along at all. That does not apply, however, to a just-released survey by the National Association of Realtors on home-buyer preferences. The survey of 1,500 adults nationwide found that today's preference appears to be for walkable, mixed-use communities with shorter commutes. No need to stop the presses, of course. If you are a regular reader of "Town by Town" in the Sunday Business section, you know that walkability is mentioned by just about everyone interviewed in suburban ring towns or city neighborhoods.
NEWS
November 26, 2013 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 2001, an 8-year-old from Springfield, Delaware County, named Hayden Dahmm - then severely vision-impaired but with a remarkable talent for drawing - made headlines by creating a comic book that starred a crime-fighting toilet and that raised more than $10,000 for the families of victims of the 9/11 attacks. Two years ago, Dahmm began creating a new improbable story. He walked onto an unfamiliar Swarthmore College campus with a white cane - "bumping into things," in his words - and a dream of accomplishing something not many before him have: overcoming his now-total blindness to become an engineer.
NEWS
November 16, 2013 | By Julie Zauzmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
SWARTHMORE Amid an ordinary day of teaching classes and supervising lab experiments, Swarthmore College instructor Carr Everbach got the sort of call one afternoon that most professors never receive. A solar panel on a police car was smoking, the caller said. Everbach found himself running to the police station to help handle the smoldering car, the sort of town-gown collaboration that he had not imagined. He helped stopped the panel from smoking, and if his ongoing experiment is a success, he plans to provide more assistance to the Swarthmore Borough Police Department than just amateur firefighting.
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