CollectionsSwarthmore College
IN THE NEWS

Swarthmore College

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 14, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The president of Swarthmore College stunned faculty and staff Thursday by announcing her resignation after five years on the job, a relatively short tenure at the highly regarded institution. Rebecca Chopp, a religion scholar, announced that she had accepted a job as chancellor of the University of Denver, beginning Sept. 1. The college announced that Constance Cain Hungerford, a former provost who has spent nearly four decades at Swarthmore, will step in as interim president beginning July 14. Swarthmore last year faced fierce criticism - and an inquiry by the U.S. Department of Education - over its handling of sexual assaults on campus.
NEWS
April 15, 1993 | By Claire Furia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Swarthmore College unveiled plans before the Borough Council Monday night for what officials called a multimillion-dollar renovation and construction project on the campus. Architect Margaret Helfand presented three variations of the plan, which school officials said included improvements to the social sciences building and construction of a 35,000-square-foot building that would house some academic departments, classrooms and a faculty lounge. The plan also would reroute vehicles around the perimeter of the campus to make the heart of the campus more pedestrian, said Larry Schall, vice president for facilities and planning for the college.
NEWS
February 3, 1991 | By Mary Anne Janco, Special to The Inquirer
An incident involving nearly two dozen skinheads, some armed with knives and clubs, and an attack on a 15-year-old boy have prompted police and security forces to beef up patrols in and around Swarthmore College. "We're not going to let skinheads congregate in Swarthmore," said Mayor Guy Smith. "They're not going to start harming people. We are going to beef up nighttime patrols so we are on top of this. " Security officers and local police rounded up a disorderly group of skinheads on campus Jan. 26 without violence, according to Owen Redgrave, head of campus security.
NEWS
October 26, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
His cell sat directly above the torture chamber in the East German prison, Frederic Pryor recalled, but he didn't know it at the time. He only knew that he could occasionally hear screams. Of the international Cold War drama that swirled outside the jailhouse walls, and the chance it could spark his freedom, he knew nothing, kept in the dark by his communist captors. Now, everyone knows. The new Steven Spielberg movie, Bridge of Spies , tells the tense, true story of how the United States and the Soviet Union traded spy for spy at a moment when each nation threatened the nuclear annihilation of the other.
NEWS
May 11, 1990 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
David Fraser, the president of Swarthmore College for the last eight years, will step down from his post at the liberal arts school in August 1991, school officials said yesterday. Fraser, 46, a physician who is credited with heading a team of researchers who discovered the cause of Legionnaires' disease, said he had already been at Swarthmore three years longer than he intended. "I suspect that I have given to Swarthmore what I have to give," he said. Fraser said he missed the practice of medicine and public health, but had no plans to return to a specific job in those fields.
NEWS
August 24, 1989 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
William Spock, senior vice president of Corroon & Black/Noyes Services insurance firm in Media, has been named vice president for business and finance at Swarthmore College. Spock will oversee nonacademic departments of the college and investment of Swarthmore's endowment portfolio, valued at about $280 million. Spock, of Wallingford, is a Swarthmore graduate and is on the school's board of managers. At Corroon & Black/Noyes Services, Spock is responsible for overseeing the personal property and casualty department, the life and benefits department and administrative operations.
NEWS
February 21, 1991 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Swarthmore College, widely regarded as one of the nation's leading private liberal arts schools, is expected to name Alfred H. Bloom, a linguist who is fluent in French, Spanish and Mandarin Chinese, as its new president. School officials said yesterday that Bloom's name would be submitted to the Swarthmore board for approval on March 2. He was recommended by a school committee after a nationwide search that considered 600 names. Bloom, 44, is now executive vice president and dean of the faculty at Pitzer College in Claremont, Calif.
NEWS
August 16, 1990 | By Marigloria Sierra, Special to The Inquirer
They met at a school party during the first week of classes. She was a freshman, and he a senior. First, he asked her to dance. Then they went outside, and finally he said, "You wanna go out to my dorm and hang out, have some coffee?" Debbie agreed. After 10 minutes of small talk seated on the bed, Bryan touched her hair and started kissing her. She responded, but wanted to go no further. "Bryan, please don't. " He ignored her. "Just close your eyes. " "I'm not really sure about this.
NEWS
June 9, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Swarthmore College alumni of decades past and present, it was time to give back to a place that transformed them. Don Mizell, 65, Class of 1971, donated his 2005 Grammy for Album of the Year, produced for Ray Charles, to the school's Black Cultural Center, which he pushed to get built as an anthropology student. "This is an outgrowth of my experience here," he said Saturday as he attended an alumni reunion event. "It's an act of gratitude and me saying, 'This [Grammy] exists because of you.' " Imitation is the best homage for Juan Victor Fajardo, 27, Class of 2009.
NEWS
May 12, 2005 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gilmore Stott, 91, of Swarthmore, a Swarthmore College administrator and teacher who was a mentor to generations of students, died of a heart attack May 4 at Springfield Hospital. In 1950, Dr. Stott was appointed assistant dean of men at Swarthmore. For the next 35 years, he held various positions, including director of financial aid, registrar, associate provost, and special assistant to the president. He also taught philosophy and a popular course on ethics. For years he chaired the college's Upward Bound Program, which helps low-income high school students prepare for college.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
February 1, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, Staff Writer
Philadelphia University president Stephen Spinelli Jr. describes the decision to become part of Thomas Jefferson University as proactive, not defensive. The merger "makes us stronger. Neither of us needed to merge," Spinelli said this month at an East Falls community meeting. But Spinelli did not gloss over the underlying economic forces confounding some colleges and contributing to his board's decision to let the 132-year-old school be taken over by Jefferson. Asked by an East Falls resident about the merger's impact on staff and faculty jobs, Spinelli said: "They are probably more assured of a position with this than they would be without it. " As his comments suggest, the future could be bleak for some small schools, as the number of high school graduates stagnates and resistance to borrowing for ever-higher tuition bills grows.
NEWS
December 9, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bill Cosby has lost another honor. Swarthmore College's board of managers voted Saturday to rescind an honorary degree in humane letters that the college awarded to the entertainer in 1995. College President Valerie Smith announced the decision Monday. "Mr. Cosby has testified in a deposition under oath, which was made public in July, that he routinely and premeditatively drugged women before having sex with them," wrote Smith, who became president this year of Swarthmore, one of the nation's highly selective colleges.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2015 | By Merilyn Jackson, For The Inquirer
Chopin Without Piano? Who would dare separate the 19th-century Polish composer from the instrument most associated with him, and why write a one-woman play that does just that? Though Frédéric Chopin left Poland at 20 never to return, Poles revere him; playing with his image is, for them, musical and cultural heresy. But that is the intent of Polish director Michal Zadara and his wife, actor and codirector Barbara Wysocka, who are the Warsaw theater company Centrala. In Chopin Without Piano , which had its North American premiere at Swarthmore College's Lang Concert Hall on Saturday night, they inserted Wysocka as a surrogate for the piano.
NEWS
October 26, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
His cell sat directly above the torture chamber in the East German prison, Frederic Pryor recalled, but he didn't know it at the time. He only knew that he could occasionally hear screams. Of the international Cold War drama that swirled outside the jailhouse walls, and the chance it could spark his freedom, he knew nothing, kept in the dark by his communist captors. Now, everyone knows. The new Steven Spielberg movie, Bridge of Spies , tells the tense, true story of how the United States and the Soviet Union traded spy for spy at a moment when each nation threatened the nuclear annihilation of the other.
NEWS
October 5, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Swarthmore College's new president has a plan for dealing with a student body known for its vocal activism: Listen carefully to the students. Craft a careful, well-researched response. Communicate with them. "It's critically important to maintain open dialogue with students," said Valerie Smith, 59, who on Saturday was inaugurated as the first African American president of Swarthmore, one of the most prestigious and selective colleges in the country. Smith, an English and African American studies scholar who formerly served as dean of the college at Princeton University, took over at the 1,500-student college in July, replacing Rebecca Chopp, who now heads the University of Denver.
NEWS
October 5, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Swarthmore College student died Saturday afternoon after accidentally falling several dozen feet off a cliff, police said. The school identified him as Anthony Chiarenza, a sophomore from Bayside, N.Y. He fell about 40 or 50 feet in Crum Woods, part of a wooded, rocky section at the back of the school's main campus, said Sgt. Raymond Stufflet of the borough's police department. Stufflet said the fall, which appeared to be accidental, occurred around 2:45 p.m. "Please keep the Chiarenza family and their friends in your heart, thoughts, and prayers," Valerie Smith, the school's president, wrote in an email sent to students, faculty members, and staff.
NEWS
September 25, 2015 | By Merilyn Jackson, For The Inquirer
Soul Project , a European hit since 2006, tours extensively, performing for intimate crowds that mill around its international crew of dancers as they solo to American soul and R&B songs. Swarthmore College helped bring it here as one of Fringe Festival's final shows, where the two-night run sold out at Christ Church last weekend. It reprises on Swarthmore's Lang stage Friday and Saturday. Its creator, teacher, and choreographer, David Zambrano, is a Venezuelan who divides his time between Amsterdam and Brussels.
NEWS
September 16, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alumni of most colleges and universities in Pennsylvania and New Jersey earn more than the national average, according to new data released over the weekend by the U.S. Department of Education. The data release, part of the White House "College Scorecard" initiative to make college statistics readily available online, includes information on the median earnings of students after 10 years and median federal debt of graduates. Nationally, former students of either two- or four-year degree programs who received federal financial aid earn $34,343 annually 10 years after graduating.
NEWS
September 3, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Essays will get less emphasis in the admissions process at two of the region's elite schools, Swarthmore College and the University of Pennsylvania. Swarthmore announced Tuesday that it would not consider the essay section of the soon-to-be redesigned SAT, nor the essay on its counterpart, the ACT. It will, however, continue to require students to submit an essay on "Why Swarthmore" with their applications. The College Board, owner of the SAT, announced more than a year ago that the essay portion would become optional when the redesigned SAT is introduced in early 2016.
BUSINESS
July 21, 2015 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Swarthmore College ranks among the nation's wealthiest liberal-arts colleges, overseeing a $1.9 billion endowment - an average of more than $1 million for each of its 1,577 students. Swarthmore's endowment prospered in its most recent fiscal year, with publicly traded stocks constituting almost half its portfolio. Riding a booming market, Swarthmore has generated a 17.8 percent gain last year and an average annual gain of 14 percent over the last five years. Much of the credit goes to Mark Amstutz, chief investment officer at Swarthmore, an historically Quaker school situated on a garden-like campus west of Center City.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|