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Sweat Equity

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REAL_ESTATE
January 27, 1991 | By H. Jane Lehman, Special to The Inquirer
A small experimental program to reward community work with a voucher good toward the down payment or closing costs on a first home is expected to debut this spring. Part-time volunteers who spend two weekends each month and two weeks during the year performing community service will receive $2,000 in "sweat equity" for each year of service. The program is part of the National and Community Service Act approved by Congress last fall. Participants must make a three-year commitment to community-service programs overseen by the states.
NEWS
July 20, 2014 | By Casey Fabris, Inquirer Staff Writer
Not long after dawn on Thursday, about 50 volunteers made their way over to a Point Breeze rowhouse neighborhood, ready to put in the sweat they had promised. They all wore the accessory of the day: hard hats. The volunteers, a mix of professional craftsmen and people with little or no experience in construction, had arrived by 7 a.m. because they had only three days to carry out their mission for Habitat for Humanity's Philadelphia chapter: completing a significant chunk of six rowhouses under construction - the framing and installation of windows - for families in need.
REAL_ESTATE
January 3, 1993 | By William H. Sokolic, FOR THE INQUIRER
Carmen and Tracy Rainone aren't contractors. But they've been hired to help build a new home - for themselves. A little-used Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) program that people call the sweat equity project is allowing some New Jersey home buyers such as the Rainones to write off much of their down payments by helping the builders finish their homes. The jobs the Rainones are undertaking for the builder will earn them $5,810 to apply toward the 5 percent down payment on their $139,950, four-bedroom home in the Moss Mill Hollow subdivision in Galloway Township, Atlantic County.
NEWS
July 28, 1995 | By Miriam Lupkin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Lorraine Rivera turned the key and unlocked the door of her new home for the first time, she experienced a new sense of freedom. "Eventually, I will change the color of my walls," she said. "And I wont have to ask anyone for permission. " The new digs did not come easy. Rivera and her husband, Jose, put in 400 hours of hard work and sweat equity before becoming the fourth family to move into the Clinton Street address. Twelve families eventually will live in the homes, the work of the Metropolitan Camden Habitat for Humanity, whose stated goal is to provide decent housing for families in need, according to Doug Wagner, executive director of the organization's Camden branch.
NEWS
October 14, 1999 | By Jason Wermers, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In a place known for its increasingly transient population, two agencies are working to buck the trend. The Montgomery County Housing Authority sold three Cherry Street houses yesterday to Habitat for Humanity of Montgomery County Inc. for $10,000 each. The houses are among 16 former rental properties the Housing Authority plans to sell to Habitat as money and time allow. Habitat paid for the homes - as it does with all properties it buys for rehabilitation and resale to first-time home buyers - with grant money, in this case from the county.
NEWS
January 13, 1987 | By LINN WASHINGTON, Daily News Staff Writer
When Mayor-elect W. Wilson Goode chose the troubled Raymond Rosen Housing Project in North Philadelphia in December 1983 to announce his administration's plans for improving deteriorated housing, members of the Susquehanna Neighborhood Advisory Council thought that long-overdue housing assistance was finally on the way. But weeks turned into months and the money needed to tackle the massive housing problems in north-central Philadelphia, where...
NEWS
December 18, 1996
Just in time for the holidays come two stories of extraordinary corporate generosity. One delights; the other infuriates. Together, they pose hard questions about how the corporate world treats a valuable asset - the much-maligned and downsized American worker. It's the cofounders of an Orange County, Calif., technology company who have delighted, with a $100 million bonus package for their 523 employees. And it's the Walt Disney Co. that has folks hot under the collar, with its $90 million stock-and-cash settlement for president Michael Ovitz, who's leaving after 14 months with no discernible achievements.
NEWS
March 30, 1998 | By Lisa Shafer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For two families who have been cramped in apartments, the weekend brought Thanksgiving, Christmas and a birthday celebration all wrapped in one. "This is 100 steps up from where I was before," said Tonia Carroll as she took the keys and climbed the stairs of her new home, built by Habitat for Humanity with volunteer labor and hours of her family's sweat equity. Carroll and her husband, Courtney, 36, a laid-off machine worker, have been living in a two-bedroom Telford apartment where they often struggle to find play space for their three children and money for their rent.
NEWS
April 12, 1998 | By Thomas H. Matthews, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Mildred Weber returns home most evenings, tired from a day of cleaning bedrooms, kitchens and offices, she stops a moment to admire her house before she goes inside. It is a simple place: two stories, three bedrooms, a front porch and a small yard with flowers in the back. But, she said, the house is always worth a long look. It reminds Weber, a single mother who struggled for five years to keep a roof over her head after she was burned out of one apartment and evicted from another, of how far she has come.
NEWS
March 31, 1991 | By Marego Athans, Special to The Inquirer
There is a neighborhood in Burlington City where a 59-year-old widow sleeps with a pistol under her pillow. She won't give her name for fear of the "druggers" who hang out across the street. When she baby-sits, she locks the children in her dimly lit two-room apartment. She's done this since a 4- year-old girl she watches came in from playing with a crack vial in her mouth. But for some, this neighborhood is full of hope. For more than a year, volunteers from Habitat for Humanity, a Christian charity that builds affordable houses for poor people, have worked to rebuild an abandoned house on Green Street in the New Yorkshire section of the city.
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NEWS
July 20, 2014 | By Casey Fabris, Inquirer Staff Writer
Not long after dawn on Thursday, about 50 volunteers made their way over to a Point Breeze rowhouse neighborhood, ready to put in the sweat they had promised. They all wore the accessory of the day: hard hats. The volunteers, a mix of professional craftsmen and people with little or no experience in construction, had arrived by 7 a.m. because they had only three days to carry out their mission for Habitat for Humanity's Philadelphia chapter: completing a significant chunk of six rowhouses under construction - the framing and installation of windows - for families in need.
NEWS
November 28, 2012 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
Make no mistake. Ray Gant considers it an honor just to be included among the social entrepreneurs nationally profiled in the recently released (and just in time for the holidays) book, Everyday Heroes: 50 Americans Changing the World One Nonprofit at a Time - especially when you consider how far he has come. But getting a glossy spread in a coffee-table book isn't why Gant started his nonprofit, the Ray of Hope Project, 10 years ago. All he wanted to do was give back the best way he knew how. See, it's always been in him to give.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2012
Philadelphian Elizabeth Robinson starts her summer vacation Tuesday in Languedoc-Roussillon, a small town in southern France. There, just 10 kilometers from the Mediterranean Sea, she and husband Frederick own a stone house with walls four feet thick that dates from the 1300s. Regional wines are plentiful. So are cheeses, stews and escargot dishes. Amid that gastronomic bounty, what will Robinson be focused on? Getting you to lift, run and crunch (as in abdominals, not chewing)
REAL_ESTATE
March 4, 2012 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
It all began when a friend of a friend joined an after-work gathering attended by Leigh Goldenberg, marketing and public-relations manager of communications for Arden Theatre Company. Conversation meandered at this mini-version of Girls' Night Out, and landed on the unusual job of the friend's friend: She was a producer for Nancy Glass Productions in Bala Cynwyd, which produced content, often home-themed, for cable TV. Goldenberg was all ears. "We always knew that someday we'd redo our kitchen, and the time had come," Goldenberg, 31, says, recalling that fateful conversation.
SPORTS
February 14, 2009 | By Jim Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Did the Phillies sign Jenny Craig to a free-agent contract this winter, or what? Ryan Howard dropped 20 pounds. Brett Myers has him beat. He lost 30. "Just working out a lot," Myers said yesterday as he checked into training camp. The 28-year-old pitcher said he weighs about 222 pounds. Myers will be eligible for free agency at season's end, but that, he said, was not his motivation for getting in better shape. "Winning the World Series was great, but personally I had a bad taste in my mouth this winter because of how badly I pitched in the first half of the season," the righthander said.
SPORTS
February 14, 2009 | By Jim Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Over the last four years, Ryan Howard has won everything except a Grammy. Rookie of the Year. Most Valuable Player. Home-run and RBI championships twice each. And, of course, a World Series ring. All this helped Howard land a three-year, $54 million contract from the Phillies earlier this week. How does someone who has done so much stay hungry? "I show up in Tampa on Jan. 5 after we won a World Series, drop 20 pounds, and come out here and just work," Howard said yesterday after a workout at Bright House Field.
NEWS
October 14, 1999 | By Jason Wermers, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In a place known for its increasingly transient population, two agencies are working to buck the trend. The Montgomery County Housing Authority sold three Cherry Street houses yesterday to Habitat for Humanity of Montgomery County Inc. for $10,000 each. The houses are among 16 former rental properties the Housing Authority plans to sell to Habitat as money and time allow. Habitat paid for the homes - as it does with all properties it buys for rehabilitation and resale to first-time home buyers - with grant money, in this case from the county.
NEWS
September 24, 1998 | By Tanyanika Samuels, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Passersby slowed in their cars to point, and residents came to their lawns to witness the rare spectacle. Flanked by police cars with flashing lights, movers hauled a 29-by-49-foot, three-bedroom house on a four-hour journey along Delsea Drive, from Deptford to Clayton. The light-gray house with white trim was constructed by students at the Gloucester County Institute of Technology in partnership with volunteers from Habitat for Humanity. While Habitat for Humanity usually builds these homes on-site, about once a year they transport the home, officials said.
NEWS
April 12, 1998 | By Thomas H. Matthews, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Mildred Weber returns home most evenings, tired from a day of cleaning bedrooms, kitchens and offices, she stops a moment to admire her house before she goes inside. It is a simple place: two stories, three bedrooms, a front porch and a small yard with flowers in the back. But, she said, the house is always worth a long look. It reminds Weber, a single mother who struggled for five years to keep a roof over her head after she was burned out of one apartment and evicted from another, of how far she has come.
NEWS
March 30, 1998 | By Lisa Shafer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For two families who have been cramped in apartments, the weekend brought Thanksgiving, Christmas and a birthday celebration all wrapped in one. "This is 100 steps up from where I was before," said Tonia Carroll as she took the keys and climbed the stairs of her new home, built by Habitat for Humanity with volunteer labor and hours of her family's sweat equity. Carroll and her husband, Courtney, 36, a laid-off machine worker, have been living in a two-bedroom Telford apartment where they often struggle to find play space for their three children and money for their rent.
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