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Sweet Spot

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NEWS
July 16, 2004 | By FLAVIA COLGAN
SEN. RICK Santorum said he's not a hater, he's a lover. A lover of traditional marriage. Which is why, as all lovers do, he was looking for the sweet spot. Or, more precisely, the exact words that would have imposed a federal definition of marriage on the states, thereby overriding 50 pesky state constitutions, legislatures and judiciaries. But, as many lovers discover, finding that sweet spot can be tricky. And while Santorum, Bill Frist and the Alliance for Marriage keep digging around, aiming for that little "Eureka!"
NEWS
December 21, 2012
IF YOU'VE SEEN the commercials for Judd Apatow's "This is 40," you may have seen Leslie Mann asking permission to touch co-star Megan Fox's famous chest. It's never a bad idea to feature Fox or her figure in a TV commercial, but in fairness to Apatow, it also happens to be one of the movie's most telling scenes. "This is 40," as the title implies, is very much a movie about fear of growing old. Mann, Apatow's real-life wife and collaborator, plays a woman turning 40, and who sees in Fox the flickering, fading ghost of bra sizes past.
SPORTS
March 17, 1999 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
Temple is going to the NCAA's Sweet 16 Friday night, drawing Purdue in East Rutherford, N.J. The Sweet 16? Aaron McKie says you need to have played for Owls coach John Chaney to understand how sweet it really is. "This is his time," McKie said proudly. "I've been telling guys that all year. He gets his players ready, plays a tough schedule, year in and year out. Playing the tougher teams during the year hardens your team, gets you prepared. "Anything can happen in the tournament.
BUSINESS
May 3, 2005 | By Tony Gnoffo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
UbiquiTel Inc., a Conshohocken wireless telephone company, reported its second profitable quarter ever yesterday, and its chief financial officer said the firm had hit "the sweet spot" and expected to remain profitable. The company netted $2.5 million on revenue of $99.9 million for the first quarter of 2005. In the same period last year, it lost $8.6 million on revenue of $81.3 million. The chief financial officer, Jim Volk, said that a year ago, UbiquiTel, which was founded in 1999 and went public in 2000, had not yet reached customer and sales levels that would allow it to make a profit.
FOOD
October 4, 2007 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
One morning last week, a new product was being touted on the chalkboard on the sidewalk in front of Le Petit Mitron, the anomalous patisserie francaise across from the R-5 SEPTA station in the borough of Narberth. Henceforth, in addition to its celebrated croissants, its quiches and fresh-baked French pastries, it would be carrying the local honey of one Scott T. Bartow - "exclusivly. " The word had been slightly truncated, perhaps to fit as the chalk-writer ran out of room.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2009 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Night after night in Center City, versatile performer Scott Greer gravitates to a spot that may seem the least logical place for power acting - far to one side of the Arden Theatre stage, and back toward the rear. When he's there, though, he's in full command of Something Intangible, the world premiere about two Hollywood moviemaking brothers. The magic spot, the folks at the Arden call it. At the same time, eight blocks away, kinetic actor Geoff Sobelle declaims much of his Hamlet on a specific area of a jutting platform at St. Stephen's Theatre, where Lantern Theatre is presenting one of Shakespeare's greatest achievements.
SPORTS
March 25, 2012
Gloucester Catholic coach Dennis Barth: "One of the big things is going to be where to play your outfielders. It's going to be a lot different than it was in the past. " Cherokee coach Marc Petragnani: "If you hit the sweet spot, it will go. If you don't hit the sweet spot, it won't go. Which is the way it should be. " Bishop Eustace pitcher Keith Wallace: "You won't see all the home runs or the dinkers off the end of the bat that go over the infielder's head.
BUSINESS
March 24, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Late last year, Lynn Utter found herself in a tough spot. As she was mulling over a decision to resign from her job as president and chief operating officer of Knoll Inc., the East Greenville office furniture design and manufacturing company, she learned she had been selected to receive the Paradigm Award, the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce's prize honoring female business leaders. "I felt badly," said Utter, 53, adding that she had wondered whether "I dare make this move now or should I wait until after March?"
BUSINESS
June 14, 2013 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
It was one year ago that the CEO of Pep Boys - Manny, Moe & Jack told analysts that his intent was to grow the auto-parts retailer, not sell it. Mike Odell 's comments came shortly after a Los Angeles-based private-equity firm had dropped plans to take Philadelphia-based Pep Boys private in a deal worth $15 per share. But there have been scant signs of growth in the last three years, even as the company has spent an average of $66 million annually on capital expenditures, including the conversion of stores to new formats.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2016
ARIES (March 21-April 19). Wanting isn't an entirely uncomfortable emotion, although it has its agitating qualities. Those are the aspects that motivate and focus you. Embrace your hunger as a unifying, energizing force. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). You put yourself in a good mood because you are drawn to high-minded activities. You'll dwell on inspiring text, contemplate spiritual concepts, and revel in the beauty and creativity all around you. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). You're more interested than you were, less than you will be. This is the sweet spot of attraction, impossible to savor because you're too deep in the chase.
NEWS
May 29, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: In two weeks, I'll be moving with my 4-year-old daughter. It's just across town, but my kiddo is soooo attached to our current home, and I'm worried about how to help her adjust to the new place. I'm planning on painting and decorating her room the same way it is now so it'll feel familiar when she gets there, but at the same time, maybe she'd like it better if she got to pick new things? But new things and transitions are hard for her. Super-awesome kid with really, really big emotions.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2016 | By Katie Walsh, TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE
Ancient Egypt, where the gods were white and spoke with British accents - or so Gods of Egypt will have you believe. The movie has rightfully taken quite the public drubbing for its whitewashing of a story with roots ostensibly in North African history. But truthfully, it's so ridiculously outlandish that the film couldn't possibly be tied to anything in reality, so it's unfortunate that it borrowed a real place as a loose setting. Written by Matt Sazama and Burk Sharpless, Gods of Egypt has a much lighter tone and clear willingness to embrace obvious campiness than their previous script, the Vin Diesel vehicle The Last Witch Hunter . Taking place in some random ancient time when mortals and gods coexisted, the film starts with the coronation of god Horus (Nikolaj Coster-Waldau)
FOOD
January 22, 2016 | By Rick Nichols, For The Inquirer
Later, there will be tale-telling. The time the mosquito got trapped in the car on the way back from the Shore, feasting on the kids who were pinned down by the luggage stacked on their laps. And the time one son-in-law's eyes turned yellow, the first sign of a failing liver. And on and on around the table - nine feet long (with the card table appended). This is the almost-closing act of one more Sunday supper in the Fishtown dining room of Michael DiBerardinis, a ritual stretching back now more than 20 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2015 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
Each of Steve Donegan's lamps is unique - not even those sold in pairs are exactly alike. He works with vintage finds - perhaps a glass shade or an antique metal base - and sometimes with new pieces he makes in his studio, like a copper torch. A sculptor by trade, Donegan came to design lighting only a few years ago and discovered something addictive about creating functional objects that also make a statement and impact the environment. "The right light can create a mood.
BUSINESS
March 24, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Late last year, Lynn Utter found herself in a tough spot. As she was mulling over a decision to resign from her job as president and chief operating officer of Knoll Inc., the East Greenville office furniture design and manufacturing company, she learned she had been selected to receive the Paradigm Award, the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce's prize honoring female business leaders. "I felt badly," said Utter, 53, adding that she had wondered whether "I dare make this move now or should I wait until after March?"
NEWS
July 4, 2014 | By David R. Stampone, For The Inquirer
Brazilian singer-songwriter and guitarist Rodrigo Amarante de Castro Neves gave a richly soothing concert Tuesday night at World Cafe Live. It was just the right thing at the right time for some of us - namely, those who've been in a virtual Brazil for the last three weeks, absorbed by the World Cup, televised from locales across the vast South American nation. What made the concert hit such a sweet spot? The Rio de Janeiro native, 37, didn't overdo the futebol references. He was a genuine, nuanced manifestation of Brazilian culture, as opposed to all that hot sun, beachy fun, and giddy soccer-crowd imagery TV has been serving up. More than that, Amarante's 14 beautifully rendered, often melancholy songs - one in French, five in English, the rest in Portuguese - offered a tuneful tonic for those of us smarting from the elimination of Team USA by Belgium a few hours earlier.
BUSINESS
June 4, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The slow residential real estate market isn't bad news for everyone. "Our tenants are a captive audience: They are not moving out to buy homes," says Jonathan Morgan , the 29-year-old acquisitions and capital markets chief at King of Prussia-based Morgan Properties . So landlords like Morgan, which owns more than 30,000 apartments, can boost rents by 3 or 4 percent a year, even without improvements. And by updating apartments - rebuilding maybe 1,000 kitchens this year, at $6,000 or $7,000 each - Morgan figures he can charge an extra $100 a month (the typical Morgan apartment rents for around $1,100 per month)
BUSINESS
June 14, 2013 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
It was one year ago that the CEO of Pep Boys - Manny, Moe & Jack told analysts that his intent was to grow the auto-parts retailer, not sell it. Mike Odell 's comments came shortly after a Los Angeles-based private-equity firm had dropped plans to take Philadelphia-based Pep Boys private in a deal worth $15 per share. But there have been scant signs of growth in the last three years, even as the company has spent an average of $66 million annually on capital expenditures, including the conversion of stores to new formats.
NEWS
December 21, 2012
IF YOU'VE SEEN the commercials for Judd Apatow's "This is 40," you may have seen Leslie Mann asking permission to touch co-star Megan Fox's famous chest. It's never a bad idea to feature Fox or her figure in a TV commercial, but in fairness to Apatow, it also happens to be one of the movie's most telling scenes. "This is 40," as the title implies, is very much a movie about fear of growing old. Mann, Apatow's real-life wife and collaborator, plays a woman turning 40, and who sees in Fox the flickering, fading ghost of bra sizes past.
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