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Swing Vote

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NEWS
December 5, 1995 | By Martha Woodall and Laura J. Bruch, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
In an unusual public display of divisiveness and political muscle-flexing, the Philadelphia Board of Education yesterday denied Floyd W. Alston a second term as president and elected Andrew W. Farnese to replace him. Farnese, 81, who had made no secret of his desire to become the first Italian American in city history to head the nine-member board, called the election "the most glorious day of my lifetime of public service to the citizens of...
NEWS
July 18, 1992 | By Scott McCartney, ASSOCIATED PRESS This article contains information from Inquirer wire services
Ross Perot left the door open to an eleventh-hour electoral gambit yesterday, suggesting he could assume the role of a power broker able to deliver a decisive "swing vote" in the presidential election. In often-contradictory comments that were his first since officially withdrawing from the contest Thursday, Perot said on CNN's Larry King Live program that his grass-roots organization should change into a "protest" movement that would influence all elections, including the Nov. 3 poll for president.
NEWS
July 31, 2008 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com
Say this much for "Swing Vote": It's different. Different, certainly, from the sort of political movie we've seen recently with "Wag the Dog," "Bulworth" and others. Most recent comedies have advanced the idea that sinister, powerful forces - abetted by the media and marketers - have co-opted the modern political process so it no longer serves the Average Joe. "Swing Vote," on the other hand, proposes that the problem is with the Average Joe. Or in this case, Bud (Kevin Costner)
NEWS
January 23, 1991 | By Louis R. Carlozo, Special to The Inquirer
Independent candidate Harry J. Kennedy Jr., a Republican, gained a narrow victory over Republican William Lahn to capture a three-year term on the Franklin Township Committee in a special election last night. The election of Kennedy, who received the backing of local and county Democrats, will probably shift power in the township to the Democratic Party. Kennedy will be a crucial swing vote and could emerge as mayor of the five- member committee at its meeting Tuesday. Before the December death of former Mayor Astor Giovinazzi, an Independent whose seat the special election filled, the committee was split between two Republicans and two Democrats, with Giovinazzi providing the swing vote.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2008 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Loosely speaking, there are two Kevin Costners. One is the self-effacing schlub of Bull Durham and Tin Cup, a winning loser who carries himself lightly. The other, the self-important somebody of The Postman and Waterworld, whose messianic heavyosity scuttles both films. Swing Vote, a disarming political satire perfectly calibrated to the national mood and to its revitalized star (who also produced), boasts a scruffy Costner as Bud, self-effacing loser. Because of a voter-machine malfunction, Bud can pick the winner of a hung presidential race that all comes down to New Mexico's five electoral-college votes.
NEWS
June 20, 2001
Sandra Day O'Connor, because she was the swing vote in Bush v. Gore, giving us Bush; the end of Kyoto and the ABM Treaty; higher arsenic levels in water; 1,300 new power plants (maybe); a $1.3 trillion tax cut over the next 10 years; a ban on federal funds to overseas groups that promote abortion; dramatic increases in the budget of the National Institutes of Health; a flat promise to defend Taiwan. James Jeffords, because he [gave us] a Democratic Senate; Tom Daschle instead of Trent Lott as majority leader; Patrick Leahy instead of Orrin Hatch as head of the Senate Judiciary Committee; Joseph Biden instead of Jesse Helms at Foreign Relations; Robert Byrd instead of Strom Thurmond as president pro tem. Maybe there has been another era when the vote of two people changed the course of U.S. history as dramatically over as brief a period of time, but we do not know of any. Poll by History News Network (http://historynewsnetwork.
NEWS
December 13, 1988 | By S.A. Paolantonio, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bergen County Democratic Chairman Daniel P. Mecca yesterday became the first county party leader to endorse Rep. James J. Florio for governor, constituting what one observer saw as a warning to anyone who might think about a primary battle against South Jersey's eight-term congressman. Support in Bergen, the state's second-largest county, would be helpful to any Democratic gubernatorial primary candidate. In the general election, that support will be critical. Bergen County, which has the highest per capita income in the state, is dominated by the Republican Party and it contains the greatest number of independent voters in the state: 240,329, or 51 percent of the county electorate - the so-called swing vote in statewide general elections.
NEWS
March 18, 1988 | By JOSEPH GRACE, Daily News Staff Writer
City Council's veteran power-brokers ganged up on freshman Democrat George Burrell again yesterday over his plan to probe the pension benefits they approved for themselves last year. Burrell held his own against Council's big boys when Democratic power John F. Street failed in a bid to take control of the pension bill investigation. "You win 'em and you lose 'em," shrugged Street, whose resolution to give control of the pension probe to Council's Committee of the Whole - chaired by Council President Joseph E. Coleman, a Street ally - failed on an 8-8 vote.
NEWS
November 8, 2011 | By Bob Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Al Schmidt, the leader of a dissident faction inside Philadelphia's Republican Party, is the likely winner of a hotly-contested race for city commissioner, holding a solid lead over four-term incumbent Joseph Duda, who was backed by the GOP's longtime power structure. With 67 percent of the vote counted, Schmidt had built up a 7,600-vote lead, showing strength throughout the city. Schmidt held his own on Duda's home turf in Northeast Philadelphia, while outpolling Duda in neighborhoods like Center City, University City and Northwest Philadelphia, where some liberal groups had paired Schmidt and Democrat Stephanie Singer on a slate to bring change to the commissioners' office, responsible for running city elections.
NEWS
January 18, 1999 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Dr. H. Evelyn Kotch, a public-school teacher and a former vice president of the national Log Cabin Federation, died of complications of a muscle disorder Thursday. She was 59 and lived in Center City. Kotch, who taught since 1972 in the Trenton public schools, was a national leader in the gay Republican movement. She was vice president of the national Log Cabin Federation in 1994 and 1995. "She toured the country, lobbying various officials for gay rights. She helped raise a lot of money, and made personal donations to the cause," David Greer, president of the Log Cabin Republicans of Philadelphia, said in an interview in the Philadelphia Gay News.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 28, 2012
A new set of city commissioners - Stephanie Singer, Anthony Clark, and Al Schmidt - has been running Philadelphia's election machinery for the last five months, delivering on campaign promises of more transparency and efficiency. They have ended a double-dipping practice that allowed hundreds of election-day workers to do two jobs at once, collecting double and sometimes triple pay. They have opened up temporary jobs to anyone who wants to apply, not just those who submit their names through ward leaders and party organizations.
NEWS
November 8, 2011 | By Bob Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Al Schmidt, the leader of a dissident faction inside Philadelphia's Republican Party, is the likely winner of a hotly-contested race for city commissioner, holding a solid lead over four-term incumbent Joseph Duda, who was backed by the GOP's longtime power structure. With 67 percent of the vote counted, Schmidt had built up a 7,600-vote lead, showing strength throughout the city. Schmidt held his own on Duda's home turf in Northeast Philadelphia, while outpolling Duda in neighborhoods like Center City, University City and Northwest Philadelphia, where some liberal groups had paired Schmidt and Democrat Stephanie Singer on a slate to bring change to the commissioners' office, responsible for running city elections.
NEWS
October 29, 2010
IT MUST be hard to be a menopausal liberal. How else to explain the collective meltdown being experienced by women of a certain age and political stripe in the waning days of this midterm election? The examples of hormonal angst are too numerous to list, so I'll just focus on a few of the more amusing ones. JOY BEHAR VS. SHARRON ANGLE: A lot of people, not just women, hate the GOP Senate candidate from Nevada. She's been ridiculed as an "Annie Get Your 'Second Amendment Remedies,' " a racist who can't tell chalupas from chow mein and a woman who thinks rape victims should be drinking lemonade.
NEWS
October 27, 2008 | By Cynthia Burton INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With voter registration favoring Democrats and polls predicting a blowout victory for Barack Obama in New Jersey, it would be understandable if the state's Democratic machine were shut down and Republicans were switching the conversation to: "How 'bout those Phillies?" But New Jersey Democrats are keeping busy, exporting party workers to neighboring states - especially Pennsylvania, which is a battleground in the Nov. 4 presidential election. And Republicans are not about to give up. They are narrowing their focus to swing voters - the Reagan Democrats who live in 55 swing towns around the state, including Washington Township in Gloucester County.
NEWS
October 4, 2008 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Bruce Springsteen will belt it out for Barack Obama on the Parkway today. Jon Bon Jovi is scheduled to appear for the Democratic presidential candidate at a $10,000-a-head fund-raising dinner in Mount Airy next week. Springsteen's rally highlights the Monday voter-registration deadline in Pennsylvania. The Boss' Oct. 16 show at the Hammerstein Ballroom in New York City is a fund-raiser, with tickets going for as much as $10,000. Jersey rockers aren't the only marquee musicmakers lining up to support presidential candidates.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2008 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Loosely speaking, there are two Kevin Costners. One is the self-effacing schlub of Bull Durham and Tin Cup, a winning loser who carries himself lightly. The other, the self-important somebody of The Postman and Waterworld, whose messianic heavyosity scuttles both films. Swing Vote, a disarming political satire perfectly calibrated to the national mood and to its revitalized star (who also produced), boasts a scruffy Costner as Bud, self-effacing loser. Because of a voter-machine malfunction, Bud can pick the winner of a hung presidential race that all comes down to New Mexico's five electoral-college votes.
NEWS
July 31, 2008 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com
Say this much for "Swing Vote": It's different. Different, certainly, from the sort of political movie we've seen recently with "Wag the Dog," "Bulworth" and others. Most recent comedies have advanced the idea that sinister, powerful forces - abetted by the media and marketers - have co-opted the modern political process so it no longer serves the Average Joe. "Swing Vote," on the other hand, proposes that the problem is with the Average Joe. Or in this case, Bud (Kevin Costner)
NEWS
May 1, 2005 | By Joseph S. Kennedy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Owen J. Roberts of Chester County may have been a justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, but locally he's remembered mainly for his role in bringing together seven municipalities in 1955 to form a new county school district that bears his name. Yet on the Supreme Court, he played a pivotal role in the nation's history during the turbulent years of the Great Depression. Since the Depression, the laws of Franklin Delano Roosevelt's New Deal have shaped public policy on economic and social issues.
NEWS
November 18, 2004 | By Benjamin Y. Lowe INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Five months after resolving to buck a trend and create its own police department, Thornbury Township has backed off its plans, choosing to remain with its regional law-enforcement provider. Supervisors voted 3-1 in favor of renewing the township's contract with the Westtown-East Goshen Regional Police Department. Compared with the $561,808 they paid the department this year, the five-year deal, the cost of which increases 5 percent each year, will save taxpayers about $31,000 in 2005 and about $10,000 in 2006.
NEWS
November 1, 2004 | MICHELLE MALKIN
THE RIGHT to vote is precious, the pols preach. Our democracy hangs in the balance. Yes, but if we value the sanctity of the voting process so highly, why have I never once been asked to produce identification of any kind in the 16 years I've been a voter, from Ohio to California to Washington to Maryland? And why is it that we can't protect our elections from people who have no right to vote, no right to be here and no right to undermine our safety or sovereignty? While some unhinged partisans spread fear about the alleged disenfranchisement of U.S. citizens, they have supported the indiscriminate enfranchisement of untold numbers of foreign outlaws - including suspected al Qaeda operatives and terrorist sympathizers.
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