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Swiss Alps

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TRAVEL
March 9, 2015 | By Tom Koppel, For The Inquirer
A waiter serves champagne cocktails as the vintage 1914 paddle-wheel steamer Savoie gets under way. The ship's dining room is bright and cheery, with picture windows for viewing the stunning mountain scenery. The evening meal, created by a Michelin star chef, includes lobster ceviche, risotto with mussels and clams, and filet steaks in mushroom sauce with asparagus and potato puree. All accompanied by fine wines. Hours later, after dessert and espressos, the sun has set. On a cruise ship, my wife and I might retire to our stateroom.
NEWS
April 2, 2000 | By Andrea Gerlin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Celebrated British mountaineer George Mallory gave a simple reply to a reporter who asked why he wanted to climb Everest in 1924. "Because it is there. " Those who find the world's tall peaks as irresistible as Mallory did - but who don't want to invest years of training and the estimated $60,000 required to scale Everest - today have an attractive alternative: the Bernese Oberland in the Swiss Alps. Though steep and craggy, the mountains in this centrally located region of the country offer a challenge for everyone from the recreational hiker to world-class climbers.
NEWS
January 31, 1988 | By Mike Shoup, Inquirer Travel Editor
The pilot of the Icelandair DC-8 just wasn't going to let well enough alone, and so, high above Philadelphia, at 10:50 on a Wednesday night, his confident, soothing voice oozed through the severely cramped economy class section: "Down there on your left you see Philadelphia," he informed the Europe- bound passengers, "and ahead are the lights of the city of New York. " Certainly, this information on our whereabouts was innocuous enough. It's just that my son, Tim, and I were now back at square one, flying over the city we'd departed 14 hours earlier on a package ski trip to the Swiss Alps.
TRAVEL
September 11, 2011
TripAdvisor.com offers Great Spots for Autumn Colors 1. White Mountains, New Hampshire 2. Kyoto, Kyoto Prefecture, Japan 3. Berkshires, Massachusetts 4. Transylvania, Romania 5. Perugia, Umbria, Italy 6. Stowe, Vermont 7. Bamberg, Bavaria, Germany 8. Ticino, Swiss Alps, Switzerland 9. Bergen, Hordaland, Norway 10. Beijing, Beijing Region, China
NEWS
February 1, 2009 | By Christopher Wink FOR THE INQUIRER
If I keep my hand steady long enough, I just might get a photograph of me racing down the steepest hill in Z?rich on a bicycle. But I'll have to settle for the shot of me standing on a dock on Lake Zurich, shadowed by the yellow sun, framed in crystal blue skies, as I peer at the Swiss Alps, not 20 miles away. In a great accomplishment of municipal spending, the city of Z?rich offers free bike rental. Tucked in a small, cluttered shack on Zollstrasse - the road that runs alongside the tracks of the city's main train station - are hundreds of bicycles and a handful of greasy mechanics who speak as much English as I speak German.
NEWS
December 24, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
FROM THE white sands of Fiji to the cliffs of the Swiss Alps, Aleta Hall was at home. Or maybe on a cruise ship to the Caribbean, chilling out on the deck and maybe dreaming of the treacherous slopes she loved to try. Aleta actually had her 15 minutes of fame in the mid-'90s when she appeared in a Verizon TV commercial, extolling the virtues of the service. "She did very well," said her sister Karen W. Eskridge. "She looked good. " Aleta C. Hall, longtime employee of the old Bell Telephone Co. (later taken over by Verizon)
NEWS
April 27, 1989
So you didn't win the $100 million. So what? First of all, you're not alone. But, more important, there's plenty for us losers to celebrate. We the losers can enjoy a nice relaxing day on the job. No reporters screaming for interviews. No television cameras tracking every move. No fending off invitations to appear on the Johnny Carson show. No frantic diogenesian search for an honest accountant, an honest investment adviser, an honest lawyer. We the losers are not suddenly overrun with insurance salesmen, car salesmen, real estate brokers, scuba diving instructors and travel agents proffering their services.
NEWS
March 16, 2012 | By Frank Jordans, Associated Press
SIERRE, Switzerland - Relatives of the 28 people killed when a bus from Belgium crashed inside a Swiss tunnel endured a heartbreaking task Thursday: identifying the bodies of their loved ones ahead of their repatriation. Most of the dead were children. Family members, some sobbing, were driven from a hotel in the southern Swiss town of Sion to the nearby morgue, where the bodies of some of the 22 schoolchildren and six adults killed in Tuesday's crash were being kept. The fatalities included the two drivers aboard the bus. "Where possible, the bodies will be shown to the families," police spokesman Jean-Marie Bornet said.
NEWS
December 23, 1986 | By Mary-Virginia Geyelin, Special to The Inquirer
Tradition is the underlying theme of the Assembly Ball, the oldest continuous subscription dance in the country. And traditional forms were met Saturday night at the 238th gala, held at the Adam's Mark Hotel. Members of the most prominent Philadelphia families and their guests were there - the men in white tie, the women in satins and sequins, velvet and diamonds. It is probable that the majority of the 1,200 guests attended with a mixture of curiosity and misgivings. For the first time since the late 1970s, when the hotel also was closed, the ball did not take place at the Bellevue Stratford, its home since 1905.
NEWS
August 11, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
John F. Derham, 76, formerly of Bryn Mawr, a retired heating and air-conditioning company owner, died of dementia Friday, Aug. 5, at Artman Lutheran Home in Ambler. Mr. Derham grew up in Mount Airy and graduated from St. Joseph's Preparatory School in 1953. He attended Villanova University and earned a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from what is now Drexel University. Later he did postgraduate studies in business administration at Temple University. He was in the Army Reserve on active duty in 1958 and was recalled during the Berlin crisis in 1961, serving stateside.
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NEWS
May 18, 2015
COMING THIS WEEK By Steven Rea Tomorrowland Disney has been keeping a tight lid on news about its big-budget sci-fi feature, which takes its name from the theme parks and looks to be taking George Clooney on a wild ride across space and time. The good news: Brad Bird of The Incredibles, Ratatouille , and Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol directs. PG Lambert & Stamp The Beatles had Brian Epstein, the Stones had Andrew Loog Oldham, and the Who. . .? The Who had a couple of guys with no experience, no connections, but who somehow managed to talk themselves into representing Daltrey, Moon, Townshend, and Entwistle.
TRAVEL
March 9, 2015 | By Tom Koppel, For The Inquirer
A waiter serves champagne cocktails as the vintage 1914 paddle-wheel steamer Savoie gets under way. The ship's dining room is bright and cheery, with picture windows for viewing the stunning mountain scenery. The evening meal, created by a Michelin star chef, includes lobster ceviche, risotto with mussels and clams, and filet steaks in mushroom sauce with asparagus and potato puree. All accompanied by fine wines. Hours later, after dessert and espressos, the sun has set. On a cruise ship, my wife and I might retire to our stateroom.
NEWS
December 24, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
FROM THE white sands of Fiji to the cliffs of the Swiss Alps, Aleta Hall was at home. Or maybe on a cruise ship to the Caribbean, chilling out on the deck and maybe dreaming of the treacherous slopes she loved to try. Aleta actually had her 15 minutes of fame in the mid-'90s when she appeared in a Verizon TV commercial, extolling the virtues of the service. "She did very well," said her sister Karen W. Eskridge. "She looked good. " Aleta C. Hall, longtime employee of the old Bell Telephone Co. (later taken over by Verizon)
NEWS
March 16, 2012 | By Frank Jordans, Associated Press
SIERRE, Switzerland - Relatives of the 28 people killed when a bus from Belgium crashed inside a Swiss tunnel endured a heartbreaking task Thursday: identifying the bodies of their loved ones ahead of their repatriation. Most of the dead were children. Family members, some sobbing, were driven from a hotel in the southern Swiss town of Sion to the nearby morgue, where the bodies of some of the 22 schoolchildren and six adults killed in Tuesday's crash were being kept. The fatalities included the two drivers aboard the bus. "Where possible, the bodies will be shown to the families," police spokesman Jean-Marie Bornet said.
TRAVEL
September 11, 2011
TripAdvisor.com offers Great Spots for Autumn Colors 1. White Mountains, New Hampshire 2. Kyoto, Kyoto Prefecture, Japan 3. Berkshires, Massachusetts 4. Transylvania, Romania 5. Perugia, Umbria, Italy 6. Stowe, Vermont 7. Bamberg, Bavaria, Germany 8. Ticino, Swiss Alps, Switzerland 9. Bergen, Hordaland, Norway 10. Beijing, Beijing Region, China
NEWS
August 11, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
John F. Derham, 76, formerly of Bryn Mawr, a retired heating and air-conditioning company owner, died of dementia Friday, Aug. 5, at Artman Lutheran Home in Ambler. Mr. Derham grew up in Mount Airy and graduated from St. Joseph's Preparatory School in 1953. He attended Villanova University and earned a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from what is now Drexel University. Later he did postgraduate studies in business administration at Temple University. He was in the Army Reserve on active duty in 1958 and was recalled during the Berlin crisis in 1961, serving stateside.
NEWS
February 1, 2009 | By Christopher Wink FOR THE INQUIRER
If I keep my hand steady long enough, I just might get a photograph of me racing down the steepest hill in Z?rich on a bicycle. But I'll have to settle for the shot of me standing on a dock on Lake Zurich, shadowed by the yellow sun, framed in crystal blue skies, as I peer at the Swiss Alps, not 20 miles away. In a great accomplishment of municipal spending, the city of Z?rich offers free bike rental. Tucked in a small, cluttered shack on Zollstrasse - the road that runs alongside the tracks of the city's main train station - are hundreds of bicycles and a handful of greasy mechanics who speak as much English as I speak German.
NEWS
November 25, 2007 | By Alan Behr FOR THE INQUIRER
Even more than beaches, mountains are at their best when uncrowded and unspoiled. By that standard, this village in the Swiss Alps is one of the world's best ski resorts. Originally a destination for British mountain climbers, Saas-Fee is so high and was so remote that it was reachable only by horseback or on foot until 1951. In that year, the village practically entered the modern world with the completion of a road into town. The modern world stopped at the town's gate, however; cars have never been allowed inside (the village doctor is the only permanent exception)
SPORTS
March 8, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
Franziska Rochat-Moser, winner of the 1997 New York Marathon, died a day after an accident in the Swiss Alps. Rochat-Moser, 35, was carried away by a snowslide while skiing and climbing near the resort of Les Diablerets on Wednesday. She was evacuated by helicopter to a hospital in Lausanne, Switzerland, but died last night, Vaud cantonal (state) police said. Rochat-Moser was climbing when a snow ledge collapsed under her weight near the 7,670-foot La Para peak, police said.
NEWS
April 2, 2000 | By Andrea Gerlin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Celebrated British mountaineer George Mallory gave a simple reply to a reporter who asked why he wanted to climb Everest in 1924. "Because it is there. " Those who find the world's tall peaks as irresistible as Mallory did - but who don't want to invest years of training and the estimated $60,000 required to scale Everest - today have an attractive alternative: the Bernese Oberland in the Swiss Alps. Though steep and craggy, the mountains in this centrally located region of the country offer a challenge for everyone from the recreational hiker to world-class climbers.
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