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Symmetry

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NEWS
January 21, 1988 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / CHARLES FOX
A KALEIDOSCOPIC PROMENADE of umbrellas amid the Center City drizzle offers flickers of eye-pleasing symmetry to those with the benefit of an elevated vantage point. At noontime yesterday, the seventh-floor view on North Broad Street near Race Street found pedestrians displaying floral and geometric patterns and combinations of the two.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1992 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Symmetry in sculpture can be a two-edged sword. On one hand, it can establish order and balance, yet in excess it can result in stasis and boredom. Fritz Dietel's solo exhibition at Jessica Berwind Gallery argues persuasively for the positive effects of symmetrical design. It consists of eight pieces - six large ones of painted wood and two small ones of cast bronze. Dietel's sculptures express themselves primarily as crafted objects; in the wooden ones especially, the amount, type and quality of the craftsmanship is impressive.
NEWS
January 30, 2011 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
Which of these things is not like the other? A. Stephanie Singer holds a doctorate in mathematics. B. A former Haverford professor, Singer is the author of two books: Linearity, Symmetry, and Prediction in the Hydrogen Atom and Symmetry in Mechanics: A Gentle, Modern Introduction. C. Singer is running for Philadelphia city commissioner. The City Commissioners Office is the entrenched hackatorium that has been ruled by the House of Tartaglione - Borgias with attitude - since 1975.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 1992 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
If any proof were needed, Richard DeVore's exhibition at Locks Gallery confirms his reputation as a contemporary master of ceramic art. DeVore's achievement is more than technical, although even a casual examination of his pots confirms that technique contributes considerably to their success. Even more impressive, though, is the way he transforms basic functional vessels into abstractions without destroying their formal essence. DeVore makes pots that look utilitarian, but that are so refined and so expressive of pottery traditions that you would never think of using them as containers.
LIVING
February 13, 2000 | By Jonathan Valania, FOR THE INQUIRER
Every generation gets the nostalgia it deserves - which, with perfect karmic symmetry, seems to be the decade before the last. Hence, Generation X had the feathered, bell-bottomed '70s to enjoy ironically, and Generation Y is now ushering in the blow-dried '80s revival. Hard to say which generation is being punished more severely. Check out Polly Esther's at 12th and Race Streets, across from the back of the Convention Center, and decide for yourself. The club has three floors celebrating the cheesy touchstones of the '70s, '80s and '90s.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2005 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Fleeing audiences leave varied attitudes in their wake. Some stomp with disgust. Others run in fear of the oblique. But at the U.S. premiere of Shadowtime by composer Brian Ferneyhough and Penn English professor Charles Bernstein on Thursday at the Lincoln Center Festival, 15 percent crept out early with quiet respect, as if to say, "This may be great but I just can't take it anymore. " Daunting indeed was this dense meditation on the life of the great 20th-century thinker Walter Benjamin, who committed suicide in 1940 while attempting to flee the war in Europe.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1995 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The more one sees of Rachel Bliss' art, the more evident its autobiographical nature becomes. Her small paintings are full of references to herself, her family and friends, but the figures are usually so transmogrified as to resemble fantastic hallucinations. For example, the painting called Spring Can Really Hang You Up the Most is a large flower with a grimacing human face. I took this to be a self-portrait that expresses an emotional state. Another small painting called Underwater shows a tiny yellow figure with a green face surrounded by fish and jellyfish.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2001 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Robert Mangold's brand of minimalism has long been distinctive in its elegance, subtlety and its digression from absolute symmetry and regularity of pattern. Mangold's work is elemental in color and shape but not as simple as it appears. Even though each painting and print uses only a few parts, the compositions are calculated as precisely as the coordinates for a satellite launch. The Works on Paper gallery has put up an exhibition of Mangold's prints that illustrates his meticulous working method and the exquisite results it produces.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2005 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Derailed, starring perky Friends-ter Jennifer Aniston, is a little like Deceived, which starred the perky Kate Hudson lookalike Goldie Hawn. That film, which came out in 1991, was a stylish piece of Hitchcock Lite that tried to de-ditzify Kate's mom and offer up a tricky thriller about marital deception and a major con. Derailed tries to de-ditzify Aniston and offer a tricky thriller about marital deception and a major con. (For Friends fans...
NEWS
December 30, 1998 | Daily News wire services contributed to this report
Byko's birthdays Sixers analyst Steve Mix picks apart 51. Singer Patti Smith rocks 52. NBC's Matt Lauer anchors 41 Comedian Tracey Ullman laughs at 39. Grunge-icon-turned-Hollywood-glamourpuss Courtney Love has finally admitted to using more than soap and water to clean up her look. In an interview with January's Allure magazine, Love confesses to going under the plastic surgeon's knife several times in recent years. Love, while not quite in Michael Jackson's league, now admits to two surgeries on her nose and one breast-enlargement job. When she was merely a rock star, Love used to perform in thrift-shop nightgowns and brown roots.
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SPORTS
May 13, 2012 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
May 3, 1991. Dawn Lacer, star softball pitcher for Buena High School, wakes up and gets ready for her grandmother's funeral. Her teammates attend the service, in uniform. Her grandmother, Albina Coia, was the team's bus driver and biggest fan. Lacer leaves the cemetery and prepares to travel to Vineland. She has a game that day against Sacred Heart. . . . May 3, 2012. Dawn Scott, now the mother of another star softball pitcher for Buena High School, wakes up and visits with her mother, Theresa.
NEWS
February 28, 2011 | By Art Carey, Inquirer Columnist
The Philadelphia Symmetry is going to the nationals! That may not mean much to you, but to the 13 girls on the team, it is "awesome. " The Symmetry is a synchronized skating team. Never heard of it? "It's just like synchronized swimming, but the water's frozen," quips Ashleigh Renard, one of the team's three coaches and director of the synchronized skating program at the Wissahickon Skating Club in Chestnut Hill, where the team is based. Imagine all the intricate moves done by a figure skater or ice dancer.
NEWS
January 30, 2011 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
Which of these things is not like the other? A. Stephanie Singer holds a doctorate in mathematics. B. A former Haverford professor, Singer is the author of two books: Linearity, Symmetry, and Prediction in the Hydrogen Atom and Symmetry in Mechanics: A Gentle, Modern Introduction. C. Singer is running for Philadelphia city commissioner. The City Commissioners Office is the entrenched hackatorium that has been ruled by the House of Tartaglione - Borgias with attitude - since 1975.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2005 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Derailed, starring perky Friends-ter Jennifer Aniston, is a little like Deceived, which starred the perky Kate Hudson lookalike Goldie Hawn. That film, which came out in 1991, was a stylish piece of Hitchcock Lite that tried to de-ditzify Kate's mom and offer up a tricky thriller about marital deception and a major con. Derailed tries to de-ditzify Aniston and offer a tricky thriller about marital deception and a major con. (For Friends fans...
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2005 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Fleeing audiences leave varied attitudes in their wake. Some stomp with disgust. Others run in fear of the oblique. But at the U.S. premiere of Shadowtime by composer Brian Ferneyhough and Penn English professor Charles Bernstein on Thursday at the Lincoln Center Festival, 15 percent crept out early with quiet respect, as if to say, "This may be great but I just can't take it anymore. " Daunting indeed was this dense meditation on the life of the great 20th-century thinker Walter Benjamin, who committed suicide in 1940 while attempting to flee the war in Europe.
NEWS
January 17, 2002 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
At the broken heart of Patrick Marber's paint-blistering and often painful Closer lies a paradox: The nearer that men or women get to the one they think they love, the greater can be the urge to pull back and seek something or someone else. In Marber's lacerating and often mercilessly funny play, four Londoners are trapped by this strange antimagnetic force that can kick in at the most unexpected and inopportune junctures. If there is a question at the core of this well-made and famously raunchy play, it is the plaintive cry raised by Alice, a stripper.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2001 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Robert Mangold's brand of minimalism has long been distinctive in its elegance, subtlety and its digression from absolute symmetry and regularity of pattern. Mangold's work is elemental in color and shape but not as simple as it appears. Even though each painting and print uses only a few parts, the compositions are calculated as precisely as the coordinates for a satellite launch. The Works on Paper gallery has put up an exhibition of Mangold's prints that illustrates his meticulous working method and the exquisite results it produces.
LIVING
February 13, 2000 | By Jonathan Valania, FOR THE INQUIRER
Every generation gets the nostalgia it deserves - which, with perfect karmic symmetry, seems to be the decade before the last. Hence, Generation X had the feathered, bell-bottomed '70s to enjoy ironically, and Generation Y is now ushering in the blow-dried '80s revival. Hard to say which generation is being punished more severely. Check out Polly Esther's at 12th and Race Streets, across from the back of the Convention Center, and decide for yourself. The club has three floors celebrating the cheesy touchstones of the '70s, '80s and '90s.
NEWS
December 30, 1998 | Daily News wire services contributed to this report
Byko's birthdays Sixers analyst Steve Mix picks apart 51. Singer Patti Smith rocks 52. NBC's Matt Lauer anchors 41 Comedian Tracey Ullman laughs at 39. Grunge-icon-turned-Hollywood-glamourpuss Courtney Love has finally admitted to using more than soap and water to clean up her look. In an interview with January's Allure magazine, Love confesses to going under the plastic surgeon's knife several times in recent years. Love, while not quite in Michael Jackson's league, now admits to two surgeries on her nose and one breast-enlargement job. When she was merely a rock star, Love used to perform in thrift-shop nightgowns and brown roots.
NEWS
October 2, 1997
On a clear day, you'll be able to see Independence Hall - from just about anywhere on the sprawling, three-block expanse outside the birthplace of the Declaration of Independence and U.S. Constitution. In that alone, the National Park Service has achieved something great in its makeover of Independence Mall. The challenge was to unify the 15-acre expanse between Chestnut and Race Streets, make the setting far more inviting to visitors, and at the same time respect the historic shrines and ideals the mall was meant to showcase.
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