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Sympathy

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NEWS
August 29, 2007
I CAN'T believe that letter-writer Phillip Daniels thinks we should feel sorry that he doesn't have a ladder for his bunk bed at Graterford. He should be grateful they don't make him sleep on the floor. I don't know why he's in prison, but I'm sure it wasn't because he was a wonderful man! Serve your time and be glad you don't live in another country where they treat criminals like they should be. Theresa Porter Philadelphia
NEWS
May 24, 2003 | By MICHAEL KINSLEY
IFEEL SORRY for the New York Times. Duped by one of its own reporters, hemorrhaging rumors and leaks like the institutions it is used to covering, its extravagant public self-flagellation merely inviting flagellation by everyone else, the paper is at a low ebb. Much of the criticism and self-criticism is deserved. But after two weeks of Times-bashing, it's time for a bit of therapeutic outreach. One reason the Times has my sympathy over being duped by a writer is that I've been there.
NEWS
January 4, 1987
My first reaction to the story of Toni Maddox's life (Dec. 25) was one of sympathy for the trials of Miss Maddox's mother, Ethel, but then I became incensed. Toni Maddox created seven children, has become pregnant again and says "I'm not ready to have my tubes tied" (all of this without mention of father or fathers). I consider it immoral to bring children into such an impoverished situation and unethical to expect public welfare to support such asinine behavior. If there is a perfect argument for mandatory sterilization, Toni is it. Paul E. Eubanks Newmanstown.
NEWS
March 16, 2004
SEPTA has been holding the city hostage for years now, and it's time for a change. Let's privatize public transit instead of funding the inept service we get from SEPTA. Mayor Street should take this opportunity to do something about our lousy and expensive public transit system. Eric Farrell, Philadelphia How can SEPTA have such a huge budget shortfall? Every new contract usually results in a fare increase. Where does the money go? Today I rode on a bus that had every seat slashed and taped up. The handicapped lift did not operate correctly, resulting in a busload of riders late for work.
NEWS
July 16, 2001
I HAD TO READ SaraKay Smullens' column (July 5) twice before it sank in that someone would actually defend Andrea Yates. Yes, parenting is difficult and, at times, exhausting. But to even suggest that a woman who could methodically drown not one but five defenseless children is another example of the "it's not my fault; I'm a victim" mentality. Smullens attempted to lay blame for these murders at the feet of the husband, who (gasp!) requested that his wife stay home with the children, rather than work.
NEWS
March 2, 2010
RE YOUR story "Torn Apart" about the women whose babies were taken by DHS: If the majority of these young girls with babies would refrain from sex at the drop of a man's pants, especially without using protection, this problem wouldn't exist. These girls are a burden on the system that is there to help those who are really deserving, and unless they identify the man responsible for impregnating them, they should not be allowed to receive any assistance. Let their family be responsible for helping them raise that child.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1992 | By Frances Stead Sellers, FOR THE INQUIRER
O CALEDONIA Fiction. By Elspeth Barker Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. 18.95 Janet is a bookish, precocious and unappealing child - destined, perhaps, to compose evocative poetry or gothic novels. But we shall never know, for, as we learn on the first page of Elspeth Barker's remarkable first novel, Janet dies young. At age 16, she is found in the hall of her parents' Scottish castle, "oddly attired in her mother's black lace evening dress, twisted and slumped in bloody murderous death.
NEWS
April 26, 2011
WHEN the Philadelphia Orchestra- a valued legacy institution that has seen its audience eroding while it confronts market forces rearranging the landscape for its survival- filed for bankruptcy protection, it was hard not to think, "Been there, done that. " In many ways, the troubles of the orchestra and the troubles of the newspaper industry and other "legacy" businesses are not dissimilar. Maybe the orchestra, its management and musicians can take some comfort from this fact. They might also take some clues, as the orchestra moves away from reliance on big benefactors and finds new ways to remain financially and culturally relevant.
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NEWS
July 1, 2016
DEAR ABBY: My brother, "Chris," is going through a divorce and lost his business. He is now lashing out at our mom and me when she spends time with me. When I tried to express my sympathy, Chris attacked me via direct message, saying I have a "charmed life and don't care about anyone - including him and our cash-strapped parents. " It started when Dad gave me a car he wasn't using before we learned about my brother's misfortune. When I tried to return it, Dad refused. Because I stopped responding to him on the internet, Chris is now complaining to Mom about my "selfishness.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Adapted from a recent online discussion.   Question: My mother has extreme and dramatic sympathy for my brother, and it's driving me insane. Both he and his wife have lucrative medical careers, but my mother endlessly insists and has sympathy for how poor they are. She calls me telling me how they can't even afford groceries, while I watch them via social media travel around the country for fun on a monthly basis. I've tried reasoning with her, saying maybe they should get a more reasonable apartment if they really are struggling with money (no way they are)
NEWS
March 26, 2016
ISSUE | MENTAL ILLNESS Sympathy for a troubled assailant While I hope the people injured by James Paulk recover, I don't blame Paulk ("Mother of alleged Dougherty assailant: 'He begs for help,' " Sunday). I blame the system that failed this young man. And I use the term system loosely, because there really is no mental health system to speak of in Pennsylvania. Care providers often leave families to deal with extremely complicated, heart-wrenching medical problems on their own. The justice system is no better, putting mentally ill people in jail instead of ordering treatment.
SPORTS
June 19, 2015 | By Marcus Hayes, Daily News Columnist
UNIVERSITY PLACE, Wash. - There is no NBA rule to make LeBron James self-deprecating. The NFL cannot force Marshawn Lynch to be a good sport, and Major League Baseball could never convince Barry Bonds to be pleasant. The same is true with Tiger. Neither the PGA Tour nor the USGA nor the legions of fans who follow him can coerce the most important golfer in history to be genuine or forthcoming about anything but the mechanics of the game. As he resumes his quest to catch Jack Nicklaus today at the U.S. Open, Woods becomes further diminished by the play and the personalties of his peers.
NEWS
November 28, 2014
SYMPATHY IS EASY. You see someone in pain, you measure the depth of his anger by the fire in his eyes, you gauge his despair by the piercing tone of his lamentations and you stretch out a hand and say, "I'm so sorry. " You can be a part of his world for the few moments that you share the grief, and then you retreat to your comfortable corner. That bridge between you and the sufferer is one you cross over rarely, but it's a pleasant trip because it makes you feel generous without investing too much human capital.
SPORTS
November 21, 2014 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Brett Brown softly slapped his left cheek, then slapped the right. It is time for everyone to wake up and face reality, the Sixers coach said. His young team is winless through 11 games, eight defeats away from the league record for the longest season-opening losing streak. A win on Friday against visiting Phoenix will be a challenge. "That's where we're at, everybody," he said. "And we're not crying about it. We don't want sympathy. We come to work. I get it. " The Sixers rank near the bottom this season in almost every statistical category.
SPORTS
November 18, 2014 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
LOOKS AS IF the Redskins have more problems than their politically incorrect nickname. On Sunday, quarterback Robert Griffin III shared his frustration after a 20-point loss to the visiting Buccaneers that dropped the 'Skins to 3-7. "It takes 11 men," said Griffin, who threw two interceptions, including one that was returned for a touchdown. "It doesn't take one guy, and that's proven. If you want to look at the good teams in this league and the great quarterbacks, the Peytons and the Aaron Rodgerses, those guys don't play well if their guys don't play well.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Why would an otherwise balanced person - a noted philanthropist and SPCA board member, no less - write a biography of one of history's most notorious, prolific serial killers? For Valerie Ogden, it was a family matter. The Chestnut Hill actor found out in 2009 that she was related by marriage to the 15th-century aristocrat Baron Gilles de Rais, who raped and killed hundreds of children. "My nephew was marrying this lovely French girl," said Ogden, whose authorial debut, Bluebeard: Brave Warrior, Brutal Psychopath (History Publishing; 295 pages; $18.95)
NEWS
July 20, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
COMPARING the now-defunct Philadelphia Traffic Court to the minor leagues in baseball, defense lawyer Lou Busico hit what might be a home run yesterday during his closing argument in the federal corruption trial of six former judges and a Chinatown businessman. "Sorry guys, but this is like the minor leagues of the judiciary," he said. "This is like the sandlot of the judiciary. " Busico represents Thomasine Tynes, the retired president judge of Philadelphia Traffic Court. Tynes is charged with mail and wire fraud in what the government calls a widespread conspiracy of "ticket-fixing" that plagued the court from 2008 to 2011.
NEWS
February 14, 2014
"I'M EMBARRASSED to beg for money, I'm embarrassed to beg for food. I never, ever in my life thought this would happen to me," says formerly middle-class John Ruths, face-to-face with the New America. John grew up in a nice home. His father a regional VP for Wonder Bread, his mother a registered nurse and teacher. The family "lived very comfortably" in Norristown, he went to private schools, John says, as we sit at the home desk from which he's pitched hundreds of job applications over the past year of his unemployment.
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