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Symphony House

NEWS
January 12, 2011
I am definitely a classical music lover. I subscribe to the Philadelphia Orchestra, the family concerts, and the chamber music series. However, I feel that the objections to the outdoor music at the Jamaican Jerk Hut by residents of Symphony House and other nearby buildings are very much out of line ("Disharmony on Avenue of the Arts," Friday). This business was operating for many years before the Symphony House was built. The complaints remind me of the people who purchase a new home near railroad tracks, or a busy shopping area, and then complain about the noise or the traffic.
NEWS
April 14, 2011 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The developer of the Victor Lofts apartment building on the Camden waterfront has put off repayment of a $3 million loan to the Delaware River Port Authority because he's short on cash. The agency lent $3 million to Victor Associates in 2003, interest-free until 2009. The money was part of a $52 million financing package assembled by developer Carl E. Dranoff to convert the historic RCA Victor "Nipper Building" into 341 upscale apartments overlooking the Delaware River and the Philadelphia skyline.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2013 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
A great public space like the Schuylkill River Park deserves an exceptional building as a neighbor. So far, developer Carl Dranoff's proposal for One Riverside isn't it. That doesn't mean the 21-story apartment tower designed by Cecil Baker + Partners can't evolve into something worthy of the popular riverfront park that surrounds the site. But it's going to take work - and not just by the development team. The neighborhood has to pitch in, too. The wailing and keening that greeted last week's presentation to the Center City Residents Association wasn't the kind of constructive help that this project needs.
BUSINESS
April 16, 2004 | By Henry J. Holcomb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Carl E. Dranoff, best known for converting old buildings into modern apartments, is putting the finishing touches on plans for a new 31-story tower on South Broad Street. A formal announcement is expected today. The $92 million project, called Symphony House, will have 160 residential condominiums; a 350-seat venue for the Philadelphia Theatre Company, which plans to present plays, lectures and film festivals; an upscale ground-floor restaurant; and a 395-car garage. Dranoff's partners in the venture are musician and developer Kenny Gamble and Walter Lomax, a physician and health-care entrepreneur.
BUSINESS
October 31, 2008 | By Suzette Parmley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The riddle of the moment for Philadelphia's developers, economists, real estate brokers who target high-end property buyers, and just the mildly observant is this: How many millionaires will it take to fill all of the glitzy condominiums being built in Center City? The list of existing, under-construction and planned towers flaunting fancy names and eye-glazing price tags seems endless. There's the Murano, 10 Rittenhouse, Symphony House, Residences at Two Liberty, 1706 Rittenhouse and the Residences at the Ritz Carlton Philadelphia.
NEWS
June 13, 2013 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia City Council gave preliminary approval Wednesday to a bill that would cap the 10-year tax abatement on new residential construction at $500,000 of value. The cap would go into effect in July 2015. The committee took a rare roll-call vote on the divisive issue, and the bill passed by 9-7, with Marian B. Tasco absent. The bill, sponsored by W. Wilson Goode Jr., could receive final approval on June 20. During testimony on the bill, Goode and Symphony House developer Carl Dranoff had several testy exchanges on the merits of the current tax abatement, which does not have a cap. The abatement has been credited with sparking a building boom - mostly in Center City and surrounding neighborhoods - but has been derided as an unnecessary tax credit to rich homeowners.
NEWS
July 8, 2011 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
When Philadelphia's big real estate developers find a neighborhood they like, they really dig in. Bart Blatstein has made himself the virtual lord of Northern Liberties with factory-style lofts and hip hangouts. Now Carl Dranoff is firmly on his way to becoming the boss of South Broad Street. Dranoff conquered two key corners there during the boom years, with the pink-hued Symphony House at Pine Street and the deco-inspired 777 at Fitzwater, and has plans for a development at Spruce Street.
BUSINESS
October 30, 2008 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
The owner and developer of a half-acre site in Center City plans to build a $420 million Waldorf-Astoria Hotel & Residences complex there. Think Four Seasons meets the Residences at Two Liberty, said Timothy J. Mahoney III, president and chief executive officer of Mariner Commercial Properties Inc., of Ardmore, which will codevelop the site at 1441 Chestnut St. with Gatehouse Capital Corp., a national real estate investment and development firm based in Dallas. Mahoney is banking on the continuation of well-to-do empty nesters abandoning big homes in the suburbs for high-end apartments in the city.
NEWS
February 11, 2014
Distaff dissed As much as the Democratic Party allegedly values women's rights, it appears party leaders in South Jersey had only men in mind to replace Congressman Rob Andrews, who is resigning his seat ("Assessing Andrews," Feb. 5). After 26 years of male domination for that seat, why not select a woman? Arnold Einfal, Voorhees, agent1207r@aol.com Job would wait Retiring Congressman Rob Andrews is the poster child for term limits ("Assessing Andrews," Feb. 5). The least effective legislator in the last 20 years - in terms of proposed bills that became law - Andrews must think his constituents are dolts to believe his claim that the job he is taking at a law firm would not be available to him were he to serve out his full term.
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