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Symphony House

BUSINESS
June 14, 2008 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Developer Carl E. Dranoff speaks in fluent metaphor. There are the "pearls" . . . that would be the Symphony House condominiums his company built at Broad and Pine Streets and the $70 million "green" apartment project Dranoff Properties is building at Broad and Fitzwater Streets. Groundbreaking on 777 South Broad Street, a 146-unit luxury building with retail on the ground floor, is set for Thursday. Dranoff has his eyes on other pearly parcels along the string of South Broad Street known as the Avenue of the Arts.
NEWS
September 25, 2012 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Developer Carl Dranoff came late to bicycling. Growing up in Philadelphia's Oxford Circle, no one rode bikes, he says. They walked to school and afterward hit the basketball courts for exercise. Dranoff didn't get on a bicycle until it became a matter of pride: His young daughter was learning to ride a two-wheeler. Why couldn't daddy? He was 35 at the time. Now 63, Dranoff still isn't exactly steady on a bicycle, even when he's pedaling one of the porker-class Dutch models that belong to his company's new bike-sharing program.
BUSINESS
March 19, 2011 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
The Borders Group said Friday it would close its 26,000-square-foot store at the corner of Broad and Chestnut Streets - a prime piece of Center City real estate - in May as the Ann Arbor, Mich., bookstore chain struggles with Chapter 11 reorganization. The store is one of 225 nationwide that Borders will close. Outlets in North Wales, King of Prussia, and Langhorne also will be shuttered, the company said. The first wave of closures was announced Feb. 17. Borders spokeswoman Rosalind Thompson said Friday that Borders had been given some time to "work with landlords on obtaining concessions on rent," but the company had been unsuccessful in doing so for the Center City store.
NEWS
December 19, 2013 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA The sketches were drawn, and the vision of a 47-story, $210 million hotel and condominium in Center City was in place. The developer, Carl Dranoff, said financing would be 95 percent private - the only exception being a block of money from the state. He was also counting on the city's 10-year abatement of property taxes. Then the author of a proposal to slash that abatement warned that he shouldn't count on it. "If they included abatements within their [financial]
NEWS
February 18, 2014
A big, flashing 'no' Although I don't live near or represent in the state Senate the area where the Franklin Institute wants to erect a digital sign, as a long-time visitor I have enjoyed the vistas of extraordinary architectural designs along the city's most famous throughway. Be it the museums, hotels, fountains, Free Library, or Family Court, this area provides a breathtaking gateway to the city. And it should be preserved. Certainly, there is nothing a digital sign would add to this historic and spectacular perspective.
NEWS
March 29, 2013
Here are some of architecture critic Inga Saffron's blog posts from the last week. You can see others at www.philly.com/philly/blogs/changing-skyline . Workplace squatters at Glaxo I went down to the Philadelphia Navy Yard yesterday [March 21] to take a look at the architecture of the new GlaxoSmithKline building, but what really caught my eye were the desks, er, workspaces. Glaxo's new offices are organized around the concept of hoteling, where employees aren't assigned their own desk or cubicle.
FOOD
June 23, 2011 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
Nine months after winning the seventh season of Bravo's Top Chef , Kevin Sbraga has signed a lease for his own restaurant. The upscale casual Sbraga is pegged for this fall at 440 S. Broad St., in the Symphony House space at the corner of Broad and Pine Streets that last housed Chew Man Chu. "I call it a personal rendition of American food," says Sbraga, who lives in the Willingboro house in which he grew up. "I learned during ...
BUSINESS
March 21, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Osage Partners of Philadelphia, Greycroft Partners of Los Angeles, and MissionOG of Devon, say they have invested $3.2 million in Center City-based PeopleLinx , a firm that helps companies give their workers' LinkedIn accounts a standard corporate look and uses LinkedIn data to boost sales. PeopleLinx, which counts FMC Corp. , Firstrust Bank and Prudential among its clients, was set up by LinkedIn veterans Nathan Egan and Patrick Baynes . It will use the new cash to add to its staff of 13 full-time employees and about 25 contractors, says Egan, a Cornell grad and onetime specialty chemical salesman.
REAL_ESTATE
February 27, 2011 | By Al Heavens, Inquirer Columnist
Blue skies and a high of 62 degrees on Feb. 14 were hardly what one would have expected this winter, but they were definitely a treat for Marianne Harris. As director of sales, leasing, and marketing for Dranoff Properties, Harris and her boss, Carl Dranoff, had chosen that day for "the first annual Valentine's Day Progressive Luncheon," to show the developer's buildings in Center City and University City. "I can't believe how lucky we were," she said at the front door of 777 South Broad, Dranoff's newest luxury rental building, which opened March 25. Inside, real estate agents and brokers, many from Main Line offices, dined on bow-tie and tortellini pasta prepared to order, then toured the models, common areas, and fitness and storage facilities.
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