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Symposium

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NEWS
September 16, 2009 | By DAFNEY TALES, talesd@phillynews.com 215-854-5084
Kendall Anderson got the message yesterday when he and more than 200 other boys heard from a panel of sports stars and other leaders in business and entertainment who were imploring the kids to stay in school and out of trouble. "It's encouraging," said the Bodine High School sophomore after the town-hall-style meeting at school-district headquarters. "I haven't been doing well in school, it'll make me challenge myself to do better. " The students from the city's public and charter schools were there for the forum "What It Takes," organized by a local science-based program and aimed at minority high-school boys.
NEWS
July 13, 1995 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The fifth annual symposium on parish life will be held July 27, 28 and 29 at St. Charles Borromeo Seminary, Lancaster Avenue, Wynnewood. Speakers will be Zoila Diaz, director of the Office of Lay Ministry for the Archdiocese of Miami; Leif Kehrwald, family life director of the Archdiocese of Portland, Ore.; and Therese Wilson Favors, director of the Office of African American Catholic Ministries for the Archdiocese of Baltimore. The symposium is for all those involved in pastoral ministry within the parish setting, including priests, deacons, other members of the religious community and lay persons.
NEWS
April 5, 1992 | By Ronda Sharpe, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Sherrill Ritenmeyer of Doylestown, a high school English teacher for 25 years, wanted to pick up some acting tips. "I'm trying to get into commercials," she said. Liza Mousios, a jazz pianist and composer from Frenchtown, N.J., was seeking a basic understanding of film scoring. Pamela Parisi, a Furlong resident and an acting student, just wanted to expand her knowledge of the performing arts. All came to the library of the Aldie Mansion in Doylestown on March 28 for a performing-arts symposium held to raise funds for the Bucks County Conservancy.
NEWS
May 8, 2000 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A successful telecommuting program can boost productivity while trimming real estate costs and traffic congestion. But how does a business, its culture anchored in the daily ritual of "going to the office," make the transition? Executives and administrators can learn ideas Friday at a daylong symposium at Delaware County Community College, sponsored by the college and the Transportation Management Associations of Chester and Delaware Counties. Speakers will share case histories of businesses that have embraced telecommuting, comparing costs, and looking at the communications infrastructure required to make telecommuting work, said Mike Herron, executive director of the Chester County association.
NEWS
April 5, 1987 | By Tanya Barrientos, Inquirer Staff Writer
What some might have thought would be just another stuffy university symposium is turning out to be the hottest show in town. Its cast of four, which includes one of the most high-profile men in the Philadelphia area, seems to be one reason. Another reason seems to be the show's plot - developer sees suburbia, developer buys farmland in suburbia, suburbia deals with growth. The symposium, titled "The Effects of Corporate Growth on Suburbia," is sponsored by West Chester University and will include comments from developer Willard G. Rouse 3d of Rouse & Associates about the economic impact of rapid growth in the suburbs.
NEWS
December 24, 1987 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
Representatives of business, education and government recently met at the Delaware County Chamber of Commerce in Media to plan a countywide symposium to discuss the county's job market and the need for job training in areas with a large demand for workers. The symposium was tentatively set for April 30. Among those attending the planning meeting were representatives of U.S. Rep. Curt Weldon (R., Pa.); the Delaware County Intermediate Unit and Vocational Education Department; Delaware County Community College; the Delaware County Chapter of the AFL-CIO; Delaware County Council; the Delaware County Partnership for Economic Development; the Pennsylvania State Education Association, and a number of private-sector business people.
NEWS
January 22, 1997 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
"Israel/Diaspora Relations: Emerging Issues for American Jewry" is the title of a symposium to be held from 5:45 to 9 p.m. next Wednesday at Temple Beth Hillel-Beth El at Lancaster Avenue and Remington Road in Wynnewood. Rabbi David Hartman, of the Shalom Hartman Institute in Jerusalem and professor of Jewish thought at Hebrew University, will be the guest speaker. Small group discussions and a question-and-answer session will follow the talk. Tickets cost $15, which includes a light supper and resource materials.
NEWS
May 29, 1995 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Arthur Shostak, a Drexel University professor and author, likes to talk about the future. On Thursday, he will discuss the job market in 2010 at the Center for Arts and Technology, 1580 Charlestown Rd., Phoenixville. Shostak's topics will include evolving relations between humans and machines, telepower, smart energy innovation and the dangers of job wars, mind wars and class wars. Shostak's credentials as a futurist include membership in the World Future Society and futurist consultant for several Fortune 500 corporations.
NEWS
March 2, 1989 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
On May 28, 1946, 30 Chester mothers decided to strike out at the Chester school board and demand a better education for their children. Carrying signs and singing spirituals, they took to the streets, picketing the homes of Chester City officials and demanding the end to segregation. On Tuesday, more than 40 years later, Frinjela Watson, leader of the march, and six of the original marchers came together to remember their past. "Black women were part of the civil rights movement 43 years ago, when, as mothers of Watts School children, we stood together for our children's right to an education in a decent building," said Watson.
NEWS
May 18, 1998 | By Lini S. Kadaba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hofstra University, better known for academic summits on U.S. presidents than for pop-culture confabs, will move ahead with plans for a major fall symposium on Frank Sinatra, an icon whose vast sphere of influence merits serious scholarly attention, university officials said. The Sinatra family has been cooperating with planning the conference, which has been in the works for two years. Scheduled for Nov. 12 to 14, it will take a clear-eyed - that is, critical - look at Sinatra's impact on society, said Natalie Datlof, conference coordinator at the Hempstead, N.Y., school.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 12, 2016 | By Merilyn Jackson, For The Inquirer
For the last two decades, the Philadelphia dance community has become so inclusionary and collaborative that it has given rise to a kind of stylized local circus that I hope will run on. The Shame Symposium by Chelsea & Magda exemplified this trend Thursday night, beginning this weekend's run at FringeArts. Chelsea Murphy and Magda San Millan came on the scene about three years ago, probably not long after (as they say in the show) they met trying out for the dance department at New York University's Tisch School of the Arts and were not accepted.
BUSINESS
May 31, 2016 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Staff Writer
Could a national sales tax be on the horizon? Since the Great Recession ended in mid-2009, America's real GDP growth has averaged just 1.8 percent a year, well below the nation's prerecession average of 3.5 percent growth. Slow growth in the economy demands tax reform, according to some economists. In response, Ed Liva, director of the Villanova University Graduate Tax Program, is hosting on Thursday the law school's first Tax Policy Symposium, "Fundamental Tax Reform and Tax Policy Issues in Election Year 2016.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014
EVEN if her fashion line was in deep financial trouble, to the outside world it seemed that L'Wren Scott had everything: a personal estate worth $9 million, a rock-star boyfriend, fame. But who knows what demons Mick Jagger's girlfriend struggled with before hanging herself with a black silk scarf on a doorknob inside her posh New York City apartment last month? In hindsight, you'd think someone - Jagger maybe - would have sensed just how despondent Scott had become. "She didn't just wake up that day and say, 'I'm going to kill myself,' " said Marcella Daniels, an organizer of a free mental-health conference that starts Friday called "Breaking the Silence on Mental Wellness: Real Talk.
BUSINESS
January 29, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Reuven Reich is in town to cure cancer. More specifically, the Dame Susan Garth Professor of Cancer Research at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem is looking for collaborators and funding to develop drugs to attack ovarian and breast cancer and melanoma, particularly in children. "They are very common cancers in children," Reich said Monday, "and very serious. " The researcher is among 24 Israeli scientists and medical researchers here for a three-day seminar arranged by Drexel University, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, and Hebrew University.
NEWS
June 3, 2013 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
A SPECIAL DEVICE women use to rock the little man in their boat may also be used to clear up that frog in your throat, according to a Canadian scholar who spoke yesterday in Philadelphia. The University of Alberta drama professor David Ley was in town to present his findings to The Voice Foundation's 42nd Annual symposium at The Westin. Ley, a spoken-word vocal coach, said two years ago he was working with an actress friend who had overworked her vocal cords after coming down with laryngitis a month prior.
SPORTS
May 9, 2013 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a hiring cycle that NFL commissioner Roger Goodell called disappointing, the NFL hosted a career development symposium Tuesday at Penn's Wharton School. Eight new head coaches and seven new general managers were hired this offseason, but none of them was a minority candidate. In March, Goodell identified the symposium as way to improve the Rooney Rule, which was established in 2003 and requires a minority candidate to be interviewed in a head-coaching search. The rule was upgraded in 2007 to include searches for general managers.
NEWS
November 1, 2012 | By David Crary
ASSOCIATED PRESS Even as its past policies on sex-abuse prevention fuel controversy, the Boy Scouts of America is hosting an unprecedented closed-door symposium Thursday with other national youth organizations, hoping to share strategies to combat future abuse. The 10 participating groups, including the Boys and Girls Clubs of America, the YMCA, and Big Brothers Big Sisters, will hear presentations from some of the nation's top experts on child-sex-abuse prevention. They also will discuss the sensitive topic of how uncorroborated information about potentially threatening adult volunteers might be shared among youth organizations.
NEWS
September 8, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Margaret "Peg" Hess-Fennell, 70, of Phoenixville, a writer and corporate leadership development coach, died Sunday, Sept. 2, of pancreatic cancer at Seasons Hospice in Phoenixville. Since 2007, Mrs. Hess-Fennell had been director of organization effectiveness at United BioSource Corp. in Blue Bell. Before that she held the same position with Covance Inc. In recent years, she also authored the book I'm Alive for God's Sake, about her experience with cancer. Under the pen name A.M. Brimmar, she also coauthored two books with her grandchildren, Help Is on the Way: North America and Help Is on the Way: South America . The books, illustrated by her grandchildren, chronicle the adventures of a soaring eagle that tries to save endangered animals.
NEWS
July 9, 2012 | Lalita Clozel is an intern with the Inquirer Editorial Board
On May 26, Ronald Poppo, a Miami man, was the victim of a gruesome attack that left him badly injured and disfigured. Poppo, 65, who has undergone several surgeries and is still hospitalized, had made his home in the stairwell of a parking lot near where the assault took place, vulnerable to the weather and to those who would harm him — or help him. Efforts to assist the homeless are often focused on pushing them off the street and into a...
NEWS
April 29, 2012 | Susan Balée teaches in the Intellectual Heritage Program at Temple University
Susan Balée teaches in the Intellectual Heritage Program at Temple University. Now more than ever, critics of higher education want to know what students are learning and whether it's worth the cost of tuition. In this era of budget cuts, nowhere is the critique more pointed than at the disciplines known as the humanities — philosophy, history, and literature, among them — where the knowledge students master is much harder to quantify than, say, the skill sets offered in science, engineering, or medicine.
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