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Synagogue

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NEWS
September 20, 1996 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia police arrested three youths yesterday and were seeking a fourth in an attack by vandals Saturday night on a Northeast Philadelphia synagogue. Seven windows in the back of Beth Emeth B'nai-Yitzhok, a Conservative synagogue at Bustleton Avenue and Unruh Street, were smashed by a group of teens shortly after a service celebrating Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year. Detective Al Cittino and Officer Ray Faggese, assigned to the Northeast Detective Division, arrested the three teenagers - ages 13, 14 and 15 - after receiving information from area residents.
NEWS
February 7, 1988 | By Carl DiOrio, Special to The Inquirer
A synagogue in Wynnewood has received a zoning variance on parking provisions to allow it to build a new wing of classrooms for students of its nursery school and Hebrew classes. In approving the variance for Temple Beth Hillel on Thursday, the Lower Merion Zoning Hearing Board said the expansion was aimed not at increasing enrollment, but merely at improving facilities. Therefore, the board said, it will allow the construction without the expansion of parking accommodations that would usually be required.
NEWS
June 7, 1987 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
After overcoming one last hurdle, Kesher Israel congregation of West Chester is ready to begin constructing its $1.2 million sanctuary on 14 acres on Route 100, across from Caswallen Drive in West Goshen. Once Bill Petrauskas of the Philadelphia architecture firm of Shapiro Petrauskas Gelber showed plans for the proposed synagogue drive, which was moved to be directly across Route 100 from Caswallen, the supervisors approved the road alignment. The rest of the plan was approved previously.
NEWS
October 17, 1990 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
In some theater productions, the set can be so visually compelling that it detracts from the play. The production of Cantorial at Cheltenham Center for the Arts carries this a step further: It makes not only the set, but the building of the set as interesting as anything else on stage. Ira Levin's play is set in a New York apartment that used to be a synagogue. The young couple who have moved in, a Jewish woman and her Christian fiance, are perplexed when they hear the voice of a cantor singing.
NEWS
February 11, 1990 | By Carol D. Leonnig, Special to The Inquirer
A group of Orthodox Jews will be able to keep a pathway leading to their Cherry Hill synagogue as part of an agreement with a local builder who wants to develop the land surrounding the trail. D'Anastasio Corp. had planned to build 17 homes on the west side of Cooper Landing Road between Chapel Avenue and the Church Road Circle. The firm's owner, Dante D'Anastasio, learned in a Monday Planning Board meeting that the nearby Congregation Sons of Israel was concerned about the walkway's future, and he agreed to build a new path.
NEWS
September 2, 1990 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
Area Jews who would like to learn more about their faith are invited to enroll in Temple Beth Sholom's Adult Enrichment Program, which will run next week through early May and will include 21 courses, from basic prayers and protocol to conducting services, as well as offerings in art and books. "We try to make it as broad-based as we can, to include as many people . . . as we can," said Joel Spector, co-chairman of the Adult Enrichment Program. The courses can appeal to "synagogue-goers as well as nonsynagogue- goers," said Jackie Goldstein, publicist for the program, which is held at Temple Beth Sholom, a Conservative synagogue at Kresson and Cropwell Roads in Cherry Hill.
NEWS
July 25, 1996 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It began 50 years ago with a small group of women, friends who enjoyed sharing ideas over coffee at the old Hot Shoppes restaurant in Upper Darby. They decided that the town needed a synagogue, and they began raising money at card parties and rummage sales. They built their membership by going through the phone book and contacting those with common Jewish names. This is how Temple Israel was born. It was a robust congregation, with a synagogue that can accommodate 500 in its sanctuary.
NEWS
October 4, 2011 | By Kim Gamel, Associated Press
TRIPOLI, Libya - A Libyan Jewish man who returned from exile in Italy to join the revolution against Moammar Gadhafi was blocked Monday from trying to restore Tripoli's main synagogue. David Gerbi said he went to clean garbage from the Dar al-Bishi synagogue Monday, a day after he broke through the entrance with a sledgehammer to great fanfare. But a messenger at the scene warned him that armed men were coming from all over Libya and would target him if he did not leave the area. Gerbi said he was told that a mass anti-Jewish demonstration was planned for Friday in the capital's central square.
NEWS
April 23, 1999 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Lehiyot is the Hebrew word for "becoming," and tonight, when the members of M'kor Shalom hold their annual Lehiyot Sabbat service, that word will have special significance. Efforts to make the synagogue accessible to the handicapped and welcoming to those with disabilities were recognized by the Union of American Hebrew Congregations, an organization of Reform synagogues. After a national rabbinical committee reviewed the Cherry Hill synagogue's Lehiyot application, M'kor Shalom in March became one of seven Reform congregations in North America - and the only one in New Jersey - to receive recognition.
NEWS
August 2, 1990 | By Carol D. Leonnig, Special to The Inquirer
A proposed merger of two large Jewish congregations in the Cherry Hill area has likely fallen apart, congregation officials said yesterday. The joining of the Congregation Beth Jacob-Beth Israel of Cherry Hill and M'Kor Shalom of Mount Laurel ran into trouble this week when the M'Kor Shalom executive board voted against the plan. In May, Beth Jacob-Beth Israel reluctantly agreed to the idea as a way to meet burdensome mortgage payments on the group's new Evesham Road synagogue.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 17, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Toward the end of his life, Lee Stanley lived in solitude. But that doesn't mean he was alone. His home, a three-story rowhouse on tiny Mole Street in Center City, was filled to the brim with artifacts from a time gone by: baseball cards, sports almanacs, opera scores, orchestra programs. Pieces of his passions, surrounding him every day. A few times a week, he exercised, inconspicuously, by walking up and down the Art Museum steps, his oversize coat draped over his shoulders.
NEWS
August 12, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jake Vistoso and his brother, Evan, both wear hearing aids, yet had trouble understanding the rabbi at their synagogue in Newtown. Since Jake had just turned 13, he wanted to tackle that auditory challenge for his bar mitzvah project. The answer was a "hearing loop" - a strand of wire hidden under the carpet of the sanctuary at Congregation Brothers of Israel. Jake helped raise more than $3,000 for the loop system, which transmits audio from the rabbi's microphone directly into most hearing aids.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2015 | By Anndee Hochman, For The Inquirer
In a city of 8.3 million people, they kept finding each other: on random subway lines, at two different birthday parties in the East Village. Of course, those meetings weren't complete coincidence; both Annie and Yosef were students at Manhattan's Jewish Theological Seminary, studying to become rabbis. Friends noticed the spark before they did. Yosef kept protesting, "But Annie and I are such good friends," and buddies would retort, "Don't you see, you're not just friends?" Finally, he saw. After a few months of dating, they were inviting one another to their families' Passover celebrations.
NEWS
January 20, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The top of a tattooed number 6 is still visible on his left forearm. David Wisnia had the rest of "83526" removed by a plastic surgeon. It was a reminder of three dark years spent in the Auschwitz concentration camp, where he witnessed unimaginable horrors. Wisnia, 88, of Levittown, remembers collecting bodies of fellow prisoners who had tried to escape and were gunned down. He recalls his Nazi captors' orders to retrieve money and valuables from the clothes shed by countless people before they were shot or gassed.
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rabbis Debra Bowen and Jon Cutler lead congregations that diverge from mainstream Judaism - in very different ways. Cutler shepherds a small Warrington congregation that meets on alternate Fridays. His synagogue aims to be a place where being Jewish is not tied to a conventional menu of ritual and requirements. Bowen's congregation is largely African American. It was founded by her mother and until recent years worshiped off the radar at a synagogue that was once a church building in West Oak Lane.
NEWS
December 24, 2014 | BY MARY S. LAVER
  POPE FRANCIS won't arrive in Philadelphia until September, when the World Meeting of Families convenes. But it's not too soon for local Catholics - and people of all faiths - to start thinking about what to share with him when he comes. Philadelphia could offer Pope Francis a tour of shelters, soup kitchens and other programs in which people with resources (holiday toys, winter coats, tutoring, etc.) give to those without. But our region is also gaining a reputation for adopting another strategy to bridge growing social and economic gaps.
NEWS
December 13, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jane Tausig and her partner were Conservative Jews who came out late in life. But back then, in 2000, the movement had not yet caught up with them. Conservative Judaism was still in the midst of a divisive debate over the ordination of openly gay clergy. Tausig, a psychotherapist, and her partner decided to search for a place where they felt at home. They landed at Congregation Kol Ami, becoming the first openly gay couple to join - and marry - at the Elkins Park synagogue. They felt welcome but believed that true inclusion takes more than the open hearts of fellow congregants.
NEWS
November 19, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Burton D. Shanker, 79, of West Windsor, N.J., former executive director of synagogues in South Jersey and beyond, died of a brain tumor Sunday, Nov. 16, at the Merwick Care & Rehabilitation Center in Plainsboro, N.J. At one point in his career, Mr. Shanker was also president of the North American Association of Synagogue Executives and executive director of the United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism, his son Jeff said. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Shanker earned a bachelor's degree at Gratz College in religious studies and business operations.
NEWS
November 11, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rabbi Steven Lindemann stepped into a tall shadow when he became senior rabbi at Cherry Hill's Temple Beth Sholom in 1992. "I was 44," he recalled last week, and his predecessor, Rabbi Albert Lewis, "had been here 44 years. He started this congregation the year I was born. And he had a very distinctive teaching style. " Leadership stays on at this giant Conservative synagogue. Yet now, after 22 years as Beth Sholom's senior rabbi, Lindemann finds himself in the role of the new tall shadow.
NEWS
October 4, 2014 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
A cantor and popular member of a Roxborough synagogue was killed by a former houseguest who broke into his East Mount Airy home Tuesday night, according to law enforcement sources and police reports. Ronald Fischman, 54, was stabbed to death after he confronted a man who used to live in his home but had been asked to leave. Jonathan Williams, 33, also known as William James, was charged Thursday with murder, burglary and related offenses in connection with the slaying. Around 11:19 p.m. Tuesday, police responded to a call reporting a break-in on the 200 block of East Phil Ellena Street.
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