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Synagogue

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NEWS
September 20, 1996 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia police arrested three youths yesterday and were seeking a fourth in an attack by vandals Saturday night on a Northeast Philadelphia synagogue. Seven windows in the back of Beth Emeth B'nai-Yitzhok, a Conservative synagogue at Bustleton Avenue and Unruh Street, were smashed by a group of teens shortly after a service celebrating Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year. Detective Al Cittino and Officer Ray Faggese, assigned to the Northeast Detective Division, arrested the three teenagers - ages 13, 14 and 15 - after receiving information from area residents.
NEWS
February 7, 1988 | By Carl DiOrio, Special to The Inquirer
A synagogue in Wynnewood has received a zoning variance on parking provisions to allow it to build a new wing of classrooms for students of its nursery school and Hebrew classes. In approving the variance for Temple Beth Hillel on Thursday, the Lower Merion Zoning Hearing Board said the expansion was aimed not at increasing enrollment, but merely at improving facilities. Therefore, the board said, it will allow the construction without the expansion of parking accommodations that would usually be required.
NEWS
June 7, 1987 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
After overcoming one last hurdle, Kesher Israel congregation of West Chester is ready to begin constructing its $1.2 million sanctuary on 14 acres on Route 100, across from Caswallen Drive in West Goshen. Once Bill Petrauskas of the Philadelphia architecture firm of Shapiro Petrauskas Gelber showed plans for the proposed synagogue drive, which was moved to be directly across Route 100 from Caswallen, the supervisors approved the road alignment. The rest of the plan was approved previously.
NEWS
October 17, 1990 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
In some theater productions, the set can be so visually compelling that it detracts from the play. The production of Cantorial at Cheltenham Center for the Arts carries this a step further: It makes not only the set, but the building of the set as interesting as anything else on stage. Ira Levin's play is set in a New York apartment that used to be a synagogue. The young couple who have moved in, a Jewish woman and her Christian fiance, are perplexed when they hear the voice of a cantor singing.
NEWS
February 11, 1990 | By Carol D. Leonnig, Special to The Inquirer
A group of Orthodox Jews will be able to keep a pathway leading to their Cherry Hill synagogue as part of an agreement with a local builder who wants to develop the land surrounding the trail. D'Anastasio Corp. had planned to build 17 homes on the west side of Cooper Landing Road between Chapel Avenue and the Church Road Circle. The firm's owner, Dante D'Anastasio, learned in a Monday Planning Board meeting that the nearby Congregation Sons of Israel was concerned about the walkway's future, and he agreed to build a new path.
NEWS
September 2, 1990 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
Area Jews who would like to learn more about their faith are invited to enroll in Temple Beth Sholom's Adult Enrichment Program, which will run next week through early May and will include 21 courses, from basic prayers and protocol to conducting services, as well as offerings in art and books. "We try to make it as broad-based as we can, to include as many people . . . as we can," said Joel Spector, co-chairman of the Adult Enrichment Program. The courses can appeal to "synagogue-goers as well as nonsynagogue- goers," said Jackie Goldstein, publicist for the program, which is held at Temple Beth Sholom, a Conservative synagogue at Kresson and Cropwell Roads in Cherry Hill.
NEWS
July 25, 1996 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It began 50 years ago with a small group of women, friends who enjoyed sharing ideas over coffee at the old Hot Shoppes restaurant in Upper Darby. They decided that the town needed a synagogue, and they began raising money at card parties and rummage sales. They built their membership by going through the phone book and contacting those with common Jewish names. This is how Temple Israel was born. It was a robust congregation, with a synagogue that can accommodate 500 in its sanctuary.
NEWS
October 4, 2011 | By Kim Gamel, Associated Press
TRIPOLI, Libya - A Libyan Jewish man who returned from exile in Italy to join the revolution against Moammar Gadhafi was blocked Monday from trying to restore Tripoli's main synagogue. David Gerbi said he went to clean garbage from the Dar al-Bishi synagogue Monday, a day after he broke through the entrance with a sledgehammer to great fanfare. But a messenger at the scene warned him that armed men were coming from all over Libya and would target him if he did not leave the area. Gerbi said he was told that a mass anti-Jewish demonstration was planned for Friday in the capital's central square.
NEWS
April 23, 1999 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Lehiyot is the Hebrew word for "becoming," and tonight, when the members of M'kor Shalom hold their annual Lehiyot Sabbat service, that word will have special significance. Efforts to make the synagogue accessible to the handicapped and welcoming to those with disabilities were recognized by the Union of American Hebrew Congregations, an organization of Reform synagogues. After a national rabbinical committee reviewed the Cherry Hill synagogue's Lehiyot application, M'kor Shalom in March became one of seven Reform congregations in North America - and the only one in New Jersey - to receive recognition.
NEWS
August 2, 1990 | By Carol D. Leonnig, Special to The Inquirer
A proposed merger of two large Jewish congregations in the Cherry Hill area has likely fallen apart, congregation officials said yesterday. The joining of the Congregation Beth Jacob-Beth Israel of Cherry Hill and M'Kor Shalom of Mount Laurel ran into trouble this week when the M'Kor Shalom executive board voted against the plan. In May, Beth Jacob-Beth Israel reluctantly agreed to the idea as a way to meet burdensome mortgage payments on the group's new Evesham Road synagogue.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 25, 2016 | By Robert Moran, Staff Writer
Barbara Cohen, 85, the mother of Comcast Corp. executive David L. Cohen, died late Thursday afternoon, June 23, at her home in Highland Park, N.J. Mrs. Cohen was diagnosed in March with brain cancer, her son said Thursday night from his childhood home. "She was outspoken. I came by my bluntness and candor genetically," said Cohen, who served as chief of staff for former Mayor Ed Rendell. "She was very direct and straightforward," said daughter Nancy, also describing her as principled and resilient.
NEWS
June 6, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
Gary Gans' boyhood plan - "I intended to be the first Jewish president" - didn't work out. The plan he didn't make worked out quite nicely. "When I came to the wilds of South Jersey, I didn't know I was going to stay," says the Philadelphia native, who became Congregation Beth Tikvah's first ordained rabbi in 1981. "Looks like it was meant to be. " After "three-plus decades of growing together" with his Marlton flock of about 200 households, Gans will retire Aug. 1 but continue as rabbi emeritus for two years.
NEWS
April 23, 2016
By Sally Friedman The message was delivered by email, as so many things that affect our lives arrive these days. No envelope as a buffer zone. It was from our synagogue in Cherry Hill. And like its delivery, its message was direct. The synagogue was advising members of increased security measures at this house of worship, this presumed sanctuary from the travails of the outside world. Seems that in this beleaguered time, even access to our synagogues is changing. I guess I shouldn't be surprised - but I am. And sad, too. In this Passover season, when Jews are asked to remember being slaves in Egypt, one has to wonder how free we Jews are. And on the surface, we live freely and move freely, presumably in peace and safety.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2016 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
During the weeks before our grandson Zay's December bar mitzvah six years ago, I was preoccupied with several things. I blush to admit one of them was whether the tapestry jacket I'd selected would work well for the Saturday service and luncheon. I worried about the endless details that go into planning these milestones. The one thing I didn't think about much was the weather. This was the Philadelphia area, after all, and it doesn't snow much in Philadelphia in December.
NEWS
January 30, 2016 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Staff Writer
The rabbinic students had come to the mosque for a lesson on interfaith dialogue, and the West Oak Lane building was perhaps the perfect place. Masjidullah, where Muslims pray daily, was built as a synagogue, later became a church, and now is a mosque. Mimi Polin Ferraro, a student at the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College in Wyncote, had her bat mitzvah there more than 40 years ago, when it was Temple Sinai. On Tuesday, she returned with her classmates, marveling at the building and its history.
BUSINESS
December 7, 2015
Hanukkah begins at sunset Sunday, and there will be six menorahs to light at Paula Goldstein's house. "So we actually could set a nice little fire," said Goldstein, 58, president and chief executive of Jewish Family and Children's Service of Greater Philadelphia (JFCS), a $13 million organization celebrating its 160th anniversary this year. "One menorah somebody gave us, one we got when we were married, and then my children each have their own menorah, so we light them all," she said.
NEWS
October 13, 2015 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joining a nascent national movement, three synagogues are joining forces in Elkins Park to tear down walls separating students - and religious traditions. Two Conservative synagogues and one congregation from the liberal Reform tradition have formed one religious school on Old York Road, becoming among the first in the country to take such a step. It is a move that challenges the synagogues to compromise while still preserving tradition, all in an effort to adapt to an evolving Jewish community whose connection to matters of faith often differs vastly from that of previous generations.
NEWS
September 23, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the empty sanctuary at Richboro's Ohev Shalom synagogue on Friday, the temple's rabbi, cantor, and Hebrew school principal huddled around an iPhone 6. They were critiquing a rough cut of their educational video about the Avinu Malkeinu prayer, a request for God's blessings that is recited during Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur. "I think we need to hear more of you," Rabbi Eliott Perlstein told the cantor, Annelise Ocanto-Romo. "Your singing needs to be part of the lead-in. " Ohev Shalom's congregants received the four-minute video over the weekend in an email blast that encouraged them to forward it to friends.
NEWS
September 14, 2015 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
There will be a couple of innovations this Rosh Hashanah at Torah Links of South Jersey, in Cherry Hill: One of the services will be shorter than usual, and there will be more prayers in English. Other than that, as it will be across the region and the world, familiar holiday traditions - prayers, songs, the blowing of shofars, and reflection in synagogues - will be observed as the Jewish high holidays begin with Rosh Hashanah at sundown Sunday. The sound of the shofar - a ram's horn - will announce the start of the holidays.
NEWS
August 17, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Toward the end of his life, Lee Stanley lived in solitude. But that doesn't mean he was alone. His home, a three-story rowhouse on tiny Mole Street in Center City, was filled to the brim with artifacts from a time gone by: baseball cards, sports almanacs, opera scores, orchestra programs. Pieces of his passions, surrounding him every day. A few times a week, he exercised, inconspicuously, by walking up and down the Art Museum steps, his oversize coat draped over his shoulders.
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