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NEWS
October 24, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Same-sex marriage and Holy Communion for divorced and remarried Catholics "can't be a reality in our lives," Archbishop Charles J. Chaput told a gathering of conservative Catholics this week. His remarks seemed to signal that next year's World Meeting of Families here would send no mixed messages such as those coming from the Vatican's recent Extraordinary Synod on the Family. "The public message" from the synod, or bishops assembly, that ended Saturday in Rome "was confusion," Chaput told an New York audience Monday night.
NEWS
October 1, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Roman Catholic bishops from around the world will discuss giving the laity - particularly women - a greater role in church affairs during a month-long meeting starting today at the Vatican. Pope John Paul II called the meeting of the Synod of Bishops - a consultative body that advises the Pope on various issues - to examine the role of the laity in the church and society. A particularly intense subject is expected to be the role of women in the church, a topic repeatedly raised during the Pope's visit to the United States last month.
NEWS
January 13, 1991 | By Michael D. Schaffer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A two-year study of what the Catholic Church should be doing in South Jersey over the next decade begins today as Catholics in the Diocese of Camden embark on two years of self-examination. Issues such as the church's role in the cities of Camden and Atlantic City, the survival of Catholic schools, the development of new parishes and the use of the church's resources will be examined under the program. Bishop James T. McHugh, appointed in May 1989 to lead the diocese, has voiced concerns about such issues in the past.
NEWS
July 18, 2012 | By David O’Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Citing the sex-abuse scandals in the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Philadelphia and at Pennsylvania State University, the Orthodox Church in America has dismissed its presiding archbishop for failing to remove a priest who had raped a woman and been jailed for other violent acts. The Holy Synod of the church, whose members number about 85,000 in the United States and Canada, announced this week that Metropolitan Jonah, 52, had stepped down Saturday after ignoring the church's procedures for responding to sexual misconduct.
NEWS
August 4, 1993 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For the second time in less than 10 years, members of the Swarthmore Presbyterian Church have received the Synod of the Trinity's annual Andrew E. Murray Award for Peacemaking. The award coincided with another event at the church: On July 25, the congregation approved their new senior pastor, the Rev. Richard R. Wohlschlaeger. The Rev. Robert Richardson, associate minister, said the award was prestigious because the synod included all of Pennsylvania and West Virginia and a portion of Ohio.
NEWS
November 10, 2002 | By Oliver Prichard INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Eileen DiFranco and her reform-minded Roman Catholic supporters are not overly hopeful that church leaders will listen to their arguments for allowing women into the priesthood. But if any high-ranking clergyman happens to be driving north along Richmond Street in Port Richmond, he would most certainly read the writing on the billboard. DiFranco's organization, the Southeastern Pennsylvania chapter of the Women's Ordination Conference, has raised nearly $3,000 to take out advertisements on 10 billboards throughout the Philadelphia area.
NEWS
May 16, 1996 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Rev. Russell W. Annich, 89, a longtime New Jersey Presbyterian minister serving in Haddon Heights, Trenton and Princeton, died Monday at his home in Pennswood Village, Newtown, Pa. Born in Philadelphia, he was a graduate of Northeast High School. While still in high school he decided on a career in the ministry, said Elizabeth Warfield Johnson Annich, his wife of 59 years. A 1929 graduate of Maryville College, Maryville, Tenn., he attended San Francisco Theological Seminary from 1929 to 1930, and then Princeton Theological Seminary from 1930 to 1934, when he received both his bachelor's and master's of divinity.
NEWS
October 19, 1999 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Two memorial services will be held Saturday for the Rev. G. Wendell Jung, 92, a retired minister and Presbyterian Church executive, who died Wednesday at his home in the Rydal Park retirement community in Abington. The first service will be held at 11 a.m. at Rydal Park, 1515 The Fairway. A second service will be held at 2 p.m. at Bryn Mawr Presbyterian Church, 625 Montgomery Ave., in Bryn Mawr. Mr. Jung was a minister at Presbyterian churches in New York in the 1930s and early '40s, Third Presbyterian Church in Trenton from 1944 to 1945, and Presbyterian Church at Woodbury in Woodbury from 1949 to 1963.
NEWS
September 8, 2000 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Rev. Wolfgang Herz-Lane was so confident he would be returning to his native Germany after 18 months in Camden as a volunteer with Action Reconciliation/Services for Peace that he paid the entire fee for the storage of his car in advance. As a symbol of peace and reconciliation, the religious group sends young German volunteers into countries that were occupied by or at war with Nazi Germany. Mr. Herz-Lane, a native of Rottweil in the Black Forest region, was asked to go to Camden in 1975.
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NEWS
October 24, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Same-sex marriage and Holy Communion for divorced and remarried Catholics "can't be a reality in our lives," Archbishop Charles J. Chaput told a gathering of conservative Catholics this week. His remarks seemed to signal that next year's World Meeting of Families here would send no mixed messages such as those coming from the Vatican's recent Extraordinary Synod on the Family. "The public message" from the synod, or bishops assembly, that ended Saturday in Rome "was confusion," Chaput told an New York audience Monday night.
NEWS
July 19, 2012 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Citing the sex-abuse scandals in the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Philadelphia and at Pennsylvania State University, the Orthodox Church in America has dismissed its presiding archbishop for failing to remove a priest who had raped a woman and been jailed for other violent acts. The Holy Synod of the church, whose members number about 85,000 in the United States and Canada, announced this week that Metropolitan Jonah, 52, had stepped down Saturday after ignoring the church's procedures for responding to sexual misconduct.
NEWS
May 7, 2006 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Rev. Claire S. Burkat, mission director of the Southeastern Pennsylvania Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, was elected to lead the group yesterday, making her the first woman to head the synod. Burkat, 54, of Ambler, will become bishop in July. She defeated the Rev. Cynthia L. Krommes, senior pastor of St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church in Phoenixville, by a vote of 307-252. The Rev. James K. Echols, president of the Lutheran School of Theology in Chicago, came in third but did not make the final ballot.
NEWS
January 11, 2004 | By Joseph S. Kennedy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In 1869, a group of orthodox ministers from the Reformed Church of America received a charter from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania to found a college. The new school, Ursinus College, was named after the 16th-century European religious reformer Zacharias Ursinus. Ursinus College, one of several distinguished, highly selective, liberal-arts colleges that grace the Philadelphia suburbs, was founded as a result of a controversy over liturgy within the Reformed Church. The Reformed Church in the United States traces its roots to the 16th-century German Reformed Church, which was established in the German-speaking states of Central Europe.
NEWS
November 17, 2002 | By Oliver Prichard INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Members of a Roman Catholic group helping to plan the Archdiocese of Philadelphia's future course held their third and final work session yesterday, discussing such topics as the city's ailing parochial schools and how church leaders could more actively fight racism. The Tenth Archdiocesan Synod, which consists of 242 religious leaders and members of the laity, gathered at a Drexel Hill convention center this weekend to consider suggestions on the church's approach to moral and social issues, the liturgy, and evangelization.
NEWS
November 10, 2002 | By Oliver Prichard INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Eileen DiFranco and her reform-minded Roman Catholic supporters are not overly hopeful that church leaders will listen to their arguments for allowing women into the priesthood. But if any high-ranking clergyman happens to be driving north along Richmond Street in Port Richmond, he would most certainly read the writing on the billboard. DiFranco's organization, the Southeastern Pennsylvania chapter of the Women's Ordination Conference, has raised nearly $3,000 to take out advertisements on 10 billboards throughout the Philadelphia area.
NEWS
September 22, 2002 | By Jim Remsen INQUIRER FAITH LIFE EDITOR
A multicolored sea of Catholics, clad variously in priest collars, silk blouses, nuns' habits and golf shirts, assembled yesterday in a chandeliered banquet hall in Drexel Hill. Members of a special church conclave called a synod, these 242 foot soldiers were plunging into a weekend session, the first of three they will hold this autumn. Their mission: to help chart the course of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia in the new millennium. Their weapons: blue binders filled with fact sheets and proposals on nine broad agenda items.
NEWS
September 16, 2002 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With a small, respectful group of protesters in the background, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia yesterday christened a group dedicated to developing a vision for the area's Roman Catholic churches. Delegates to the new archdiocesan synod were joined by more than a thousand Catholics at a Mass celebrated by Cardinal Anthony Bevilacqua at the Cathedral Basilica of SS. Peter and Paul. As a procession of the 242 delegates, visiting clergy and seminarians passed along 18th Street before entering the cathedral, about 20 representatives from half a dozen protest groups held hands, sang and waved placards.
NEWS
July 14, 2002 | By Jim Remsen INQUIRER FAITH LIFE EDITOR
'The voice of the people" is being heard, after a fashion, in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. Through a special assembly called a synod, a select group of the faithful is helping Cardinal Anthony J. Bevilacqua evaluate "the current state of the church's life in order to create a vision and plan for the future. " It's the first synod here in 68 years, and the 250 official delegates - more than half of them lay Catholics - are toiling away in preparation for action this autumn.
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