CollectionsSyrup
IN THE NEWS

Syrup

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 13, 1991 | By Stella M. Eisele, Special to The Inquirer
Wisps of steam curled around Ralph Curtis' hands and fogged his glasses as he peered into a four-foot-wide pan of maple syrup slowly heating over bright blue propane-fed flames. "A watched pot . . . ," Curtis muttered as he gently dragged a tubular cup in circular motions through about 12 gallons of glossy brown syrup. With the smooth moves of a master craftsman, he lifted a cupful of steaming syrup and tested its density with a long glass tube called a hydrometer. The instrument told him what his eyes and hands already knew: The syrup was not quite ready.
FOOD
March 9, 1988 | By POLLY FISHER, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: I like blueberry syrup, which is rather expensive. I have access to fresh blueberries and would make my own syrup, if only I had a recipe. Can you help? - Alma Dear Alma: Here is a simple recipe for making any type of berry syrup. It's delicious with fresh blueberries, but can be used with strawberries or raspberries. Frozen fruit can be added as well. Pick over, wash and crush 2 cups ripe berries. In a 2-quart saucepan, bring the crushed berries to a boil over medium heat, watching carefully so they don't boil over.
NEWS
February 22, 1987 | By S. A. Paolantonio, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the wooded Andorra Natural Area of Philadelphia yesterday, 8-year-old Linda Curry of Mount Airy learned a valuable lesson of the annual maple harvest: Syrup takes its sweet time. Tapping the maple tree, waiting for the sap to fill the harvest bucket and boiling away the excess water to make syrup is a painstaking, labor-intensive process. "It's so much easier to buy it in the store," said Linda, who was in the natural area with dozens of other kids and their parents for the Maple Sugar Festival.
FOOD
September 6, 2000 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
What: Mama Mary's Homestyle Pancakes Maker: Spartan Foods of America Where: Supermarket dairy cases Size: 16.5 ounces, 6 (6-inch) pancakes Price: $2.99 Introduced last year, these nonfrozen refrigerated pancakes go into national distribution next month. They are ready-to-eat, plate-size adult pancakes, which heat in 30 seconds by microwave. Good nutrient balance makes these perfect for quick breakfasts. Each pancake has 180 calories, 4 grams of fat and 460 milligrams sodium (from leavening agents)
NEWS
April 11, 1996 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Kindergartners at Country Day School of the Sacred Heart in Bryn Mawr made delicious syrup from sap they collected from two campus maple trees. It began with a spring lesson about the budding plants they observed in their classroom and on the campus. With winter's end, the class followed its teacher, Surrey Flint, outside to two sugar maples, and watched as she drove a small metal spout, known as a spile, into the trunk before hanging a collection bag under it. She explained that the combination of cold nights and warm days makes the sap run in these trees.
NEWS
January 20, 1990 | By Joseph P. Blake, Daily News Staff Writer
A 64-year-old Frankford pharmacist was arrested yesterday and charged with illegally dispensing prescription drugs worth $6 million on the street. Many of the drugs were those used to make the popular but deadly combination known as "pancakes and syrup. " The pharmacist, Louis Brickman, operator of Lou's Pharmacy on Frankford Avenue near Dyer Street, was led from his store in handcuffs by Drug Enforcement Administration agents as several surprised customers looked on. Brickman dispensed about 1.9 million dosage units of controlled drugs that included Dilaudid, Ritalin, Tuinal, Doriden, Emprin with codeine, Tussionex suspension, Valium, and bromanyl expectorant, according to DEA special agent Lewis Rice.
NEWS
March 29, 1989 | By Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
The former owner of an East Falls drugstore, his pharmacist, and their best customer yesterday were each sentenced to five years in prison by a federal judge for trafficking in deadly drugs known to abusers as "pancakes and syrup. " U.S. District Judge Jan E. DuBois said 113 people in Philadelphia died of overdoses from the sedative Glutethimide combined with codeine-based cough syrup during the 30-month period when the three defendants trafficked in the drugs. "The crime is such that prison is absolutely necessary," the judge said.
NEWS
October 8, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
MONTPELIER, VT. - In a state that touts its long history of maple-syrup production and fiercely protects the purity of its brand, Vermont producers are proud of their "fancy," "grade A dark amber" and "grade B" syrup. But Vermont is considering joining with other syrup-producing states and Canadian provinces in selling a product with one grading standard, triggering fears by some producers that the state's vaunted brand will lose its reputation if it doesn't stand out from the rest - as they say it should.
FOOD
April 9, 2009 | By Bill Mcauliffe and Lee Svitak Dean, MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE
MINNEAPOLIS - Sweat was sparkling just below the edge of Brother Walter Kieffer's fleece cap as he high-stepped through the snow in a maple forest at St. John's University, quickly drilling holes in one tree after another. But 47 years after he first started helping coax hundreds of maples into sharing their sap for syrup, Kieffer described it as something more than a chore. "It's a lot of, lot of work, but it's just something to get spring going in your blood," Kieffer said during a brief pause.
FOOD
February 21, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Here in the heart of Germantown, we're salivating for sap, the precious, watery liquid that drips and dribbles out of maple trees and, with considerable effort, is transformed into magical maple syrup. We're at Wyck, the 18th-century house with a rose garden, a market farm, and most important, a stand of 70-foot sugar maples. "It's maple-syrup time," says Christina Moresi, Wyck's educator and leader of our unlikely urban sugaring party, which includes Elizabeth Belk, Wyck's horticulturist, and Jeff Eckel, the caretaker and beekeeper.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
February 21, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Here in the heart of Germantown, we're salivating for sap, the precious, watery liquid that drips and dribbles out of maple trees and, with considerable effort, is transformed into magical maple syrup. We're at Wyck, the 18th-century house with a rose garden, a market farm, and most important, a stand of 70-foot sugar maples. "It's maple-syrup time," says Christina Moresi, Wyck's educator and leader of our unlikely urban sugaring party, which includes Elizabeth Belk, Wyck's horticulturist, and Jeff Eckel, the caretaker and beekeeper.
NEWS
December 2, 2013 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
Information is like turkey and stuffing. It's hard to tell when you've had enough. And the more you get, the more you want. At least that's how I feel. I'm bad at portion control, whether it's Thanksgiving dinner or information. Obviously, I don't believe there's such a thing as too much information. If you read this column, you know about my bunions, fleas, cellulite, and Mother Mary. One of these is to be avoided at all costs. Not the one you think. FYI, I love information.
FOOD
July 19, 2013
Here is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat of July 16, 2013: Craig LaBan: In last week's chat, a reader recommended Kidari Sushi Yatai, from Raw's former sushi chef Sam Yoon, the new raw-fish counter on the 1800 block of South Street (across from the old Graduate Hospital). I'd had a so-so visit, so decided to go back and I really enjoyed it - especially this Cy-sashimi don, basically a sashimi salad with ribbons of tuna, yellowtail, and salmon with roe over greens and a bed of rice with gochuchang vinaigrette on the side.
FOOD
June 13, 2013 | Stephanie Witt Sedgwick, Washington Post
In this updated bacon-dressed spinach salad, the bacon is replaced with a leaner, lighter, sweeter cured-pork product: prosciutto from Parma. The dressing can be made a day ahead. Bring it to room temperature before using, mixing in a tablespoon of oil or water to loosen it up if necessary. Spinach and Prosciutto Salad With Apple-Onion Vinaigrette Makes 4 servings 3 tablespoons olive oil 1 small onion, finely diced (3/4 cup) 1 large tart apple, such as Granny Smith, peeled, cored, cut in 1/4-inch dice 1 tablespoon maple syrup, or more to taste Kosher salt Freshly ground black pepper 3 tablespoons apple cider vinegar About 10 ounces fresh baby spinach 6 thin slices Prosciutto di Parma (about 3 ounces)
FOOD
June 7, 2013 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
If having flowers on the table can make a meal seem twice as delectable - as erudite food writer Michael Pollan asserts - then how many times tastier might that meal be with the flowers in it? Many common blossoms are both decorative and flavorful additions to salads, entrees, and desserts. Further, they are full of phytochemicals, from A (antioxidants) to V (vitamins). They also are among the most ephemeral of ingredients - what I call "hyperseasonal," mementos of a fleeting moment in a plant's life cycle.
FOOD
February 7, 2013
Bonbons for your baby Marcie Blaine chocolates has added several new flavors for Valentine's Day: the lovely strawberry cava, also red hot cinnamon, white hot cinnamon, and white chocolate passionfruit. Throw in a couple of the Philly series chocolates, including my favorite, peanut butter pretzel ganache, and a salted caramel, and you'll have a happy Valentine. - Maureen Fitzgerald Marcie Blaine artisanal chocolates, 9 pieces for $17.95; at 108 S., 13th St.   Syrup for your sweetie   For the ultimate breakfast in bed, drizzle some of this ethereal maple syrup on pancakes or waffles.
FOOD
December 20, 2012
Makes 10 servings 2 navel oranges, split and sliced as thinly as possible into half-circles. 1/2 quart water 1 cup sugar 1/2 tablespoon toasted and ground coriander seed 1/2 tablespoon toasted and ground cumin seed 1/2 tablespoon ground cinnamon 1 teaspoon toasted and ground caraway seed 1. Combine the water, sugar, and spices and bring to a boil. Place the orange slices in a large metal mixing bowl and pour the spice syrup over the slices. 2. Cover tightly with plastic wrap and leave at room temperature until cool, at least 4 hours.
NEWS
November 9, 2012
THE QUESTION arises: Are you really going to make beer in a bathtub at the Bathtub Beer Fest? Philly Beer Week has been promising an authentic bathtub brew at next Thursday's festival at the National Constitution Center, as a tribute to its outstanding exhibit, "American Spirits: The Rise & Fall of Prohibition. " The idea is to wheel some old-fashioned cast-iron bathtubs into the center and bubble up a batch of authentic, Prohibition-era suds. Speaking as Beer Week's executive director, I can assure you this idea was the product of an ample infusion of liquid inspiration.
NEWS
October 8, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
MONTPELIER, VT. - In a state that touts its long history of maple-syrup production and fiercely protects the purity of its brand, Vermont producers are proud of their "fancy," "grade A dark amber" and "grade B" syrup. But Vermont is considering joining with other syrup-producing states and Canadian provinces in selling a product with one grading standard, triggering fears by some producers that the state's vaunted brand will lose its reputation if it doesn't stand out from the rest - as they say it should.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2012
The Prima Vera Half of asparagus spear (including top) ¾ inch celery ¼ inch shaved fennel bulb ¼ inch cucumber, peeled, one slice ½ ounce fresh lemon juice ½ ounce Cointreau 2 ounces aquavit Dash of agave 2 dashes of tarragon bitters, or muddle fresh tarragon around inside rim of glass   Muddle all vegetables in shaker, then add ice, shake, double strain into cocktail glass. Serve up with an orange twist. Serves 1.   Source: Daniel Miller, Vedge.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|