CollectionsTabasco
IN THE NEWS

Tabasco

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 26, 2013
Paul C.P. McIlhenny, 68, chief executive and board chairman of the McIlhenny Co. that makes the trademarked line of Tabasco hot pepper sauces sold the world over, has died. The company, based on south Louisiana's Avery Island, said in a statement released Sunday that Mr. McIlhenny had died Saturday. The statement credited Mr. McIlhenny's leadership with introducing several new varieties of hot sauces sold under the Tabasco brand and for greatly expanding their global reach. Mr. McIlhenny was a member of a storied clan whose 145-year-old company has been producing the original world-famous Tabasco sauce for several generations, since shortly after the Civil War. The statement said he joined the company in 1967 and directly oversaw production and quality of all products sold under the Tabasco brand for 13 years.
NEWS
September 29, 1993 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
A VOW OF SILENCE? FUNNY YOU SHOULD ASK Griping isn't part of a nun's job description, so for years a convent of kindly sisters living alongside a garbage dump in Oxnard, Calif., suffered in silence. But polite fibbing is taboo, too. Once county officials asked them about it, they told the truth: The dump stinks, and it's terribly noisy. "We don't complain. It is our way to suffer to ourselves. But if someone asks, we have to tell the truth," said Sister Beatriz Gomez, a native of Colombia who entered the Sisters, Servants of Mary convent three years ago. "When you want to talk to your Heavenly Father, you need quiet," she said.
NEWS
September 11, 2011 | By Antonio Villegas, Associated Press
VILLAHERMOSA, Mexico - Air and sea search teams intensified their hunt Saturday for 10 missing oil workers as Tropical Storm Nate headed west, threatening new areas of Mexico's gulf coast. Meanwhile, fishermen's groups reported at least a dozen fishermen aboard two Mexican shrimp boats went missing in the gulf Friday. Nate was still moving toward the coast slowly but was expected to pick up some speed Saturday, said the U.S. National Hurricane Center in Miami. Forecasters said the storm would approach the coast Sunday, most likely just below hurricane strength.
FOOD
May 18, 1994 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Food Editor
Food doesn't come much fresher than the kind Lonnie Brooks grew up with. "My grandfather was a trapper and a hunter and lived with us, so we ate a lot of pork and wild food: rabbits, coons, birds, squirrels," recalled Brooks, a blues guitarist who grew up in Dubuisson, La. "It's hard to kill a squirrel, 'cause they're so fast. " Blues diva Marva Wright grew up in Louisiana, too, but she was from New Orleans, a city with a wealth of skilled church cooks. "We'd have suppers to raise money: fried chicken, potato salad, spaghetti and meatballs, green beans, chitlins, gumbo.
FOOD
January 4, 1995 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Food Editor
A guest at Cape May's venerable Chalfonte Hotel described the hotel's cookbook thusly: "It's like putting folklore in your stomach. " The Victorian-style hotel, built in 1876 and listed in the National Register of Historic Places, collected its most enduring recipes in 1986 for a cookbook called "I Just Quit Stirrin' When the Tastin's Good. " The title pretty much sums up how chief chef Helen Dickerson went about her business for 32 years in the Chalfonte kitchen. "Miss Helen," the third generation of her family to work at the Chalfonte, was there for more than 70 years and continued to cook until shortly before her death in 1990 at age 81. Her mother, Clementine Young, had been head chambermaid for more than 60 years.
FOOD
October 9, 1991 | by Bonnie Tandy Leblang and Carolyn Wyman, Special to the Daily News
Pillsbury Oven Lovin' Cookies Refrigerated Dough. Candy cookies, chocolate chip cookies, and cookies with Reese's Pieces. $2.69 per 18-ounce tub yielding 2 1/2-3 dozen cookies. Bonnie: Oven Lovin' cookies are the closest to home-baked, made-from- scratch cookies made by a national food company. Basically these are tubs of dough waiting to be spooned onto a cookie sheet and baked. No need even to slice. But as with most ultra-convenient foods, you pay steeply for the convenience (about 8 cents per cookie)
FOOD
December 22, 2011 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
Here is an excerpt from the blog "My Daughter's Kitchen. " When our three kids come home for Christmas, they always want the meals they remember. It's funny, as I don't think of our dinners together as Norman Rockwellesque. It was always a challenge for me to get home to get it on the table, and someone was always running somewhere five minutes after we sat down. But I guess all of that is part of the family glue. One of the family favorites was this stir-fry dinner that is so old, it was called "Basic Oriental Stir-fry with Chicken.
BUSINESS
January 15, 1999 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
A 30-second TV commercial for the Super Bowl costs $1.6 million these days. So you can bet sponsors want you to like their ads. Pepsi had the best-liked commercials in three out of the last four Super Bowls. Last year, instead of Pepsi, an exploding mosquito held more attraction for viewers, according to a study by the advertising research firm, Gallup & Robinson. The mosquito starred in a 30-second Tabasco commercial that showed the insect exploding after biting a man who put two bottles of Tabasco sauce on the sandwich he was eating.
FOOD
November 22, 2000 | By Jon Caroulis, FOR THE INQUIRER
The boss assigned Gina Stuardi this task: Make a Bloody Mary that's spicy - but don't use horseradish. That's akin to saying make me a pizza, but don't use cheese, dough or tomato sauce. "[The owner] hated horseradish, so I had to come up with something else," said Stuardi, who tends bar at Marabella's, 401 City Ave., in Bala Cynwyd. "I love mustard. So I tried it, and he liked it. " She used a Dijon variety, along with Lee & Perrins Worcestershire sauce, Tabasco sauce, A-1 steak sauce and fresh ground pepper.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 20, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mementos around her house might have raised intriguing questions about where Marion Flood Kaisla worked. There were the highball glasses with etchings of the StarKist advertising figure Charlie the Tuna. There were bottles of several varieties of Tabasco sauce brought back from the brewing vats on Avery Island, La. And strangely, bottles of experimental forms of Heinz ketchup, colored green and purple. "I thought they were disgusting," Mrs. Kaisla's daughter, Katherine A. Dewechter, said about the ketchup, "but my kids loved them.
NEWS
February 26, 2013
Paul C.P. McIlhenny, 68, chief executive and board chairman of the McIlhenny Co. that makes the trademarked line of Tabasco hot pepper sauces sold the world over, has died. The company, based on south Louisiana's Avery Island, said in a statement released Sunday that Mr. McIlhenny had died Saturday. The statement credited Mr. McIlhenny's leadership with introducing several new varieties of hot sauces sold under the Tabasco brand and for greatly expanding their global reach. Mr. McIlhenny was a member of a storied clan whose 145-year-old company has been producing the original world-famous Tabasco sauce for several generations, since shortly after the Civil War. The statement said he joined the company in 1967 and directly oversaw production and quality of all products sold under the Tabasco brand for 13 years.
NEWS
February 26, 2013
HAVANA - Cuban President Raul Castro says he will not seek another five-year term after the one he started Sunday ends. He has tapped 52-year-old Miguel Diaz-Canel as his top deputy, ready to assume the presidency without any disruption. Castro says that the country has reached a "transcendent" moment in which it is ready to start transferring responsibility and power to a younger generation. Diaz-Canel's appointment marks the first time someone who did not directly participate in the 1959 Cuban revolution assumed such an important role.
FOOD
December 22, 2011 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
Here is an excerpt from the blog "My Daughter's Kitchen. " When our three kids come home for Christmas, they always want the meals they remember. It's funny, as I don't think of our dinners together as Norman Rockwellesque. It was always a challenge for me to get home to get it on the table, and someone was always running somewhere five minutes after we sat down. But I guess all of that is part of the family glue. One of the family favorites was this stir-fry dinner that is so old, it was called "Basic Oriental Stir-fry with Chicken.
NEWS
September 11, 2011 | By Antonio Villegas, Associated Press
VILLAHERMOSA, Mexico - Air and sea search teams intensified their hunt Saturday for 10 missing oil workers as Tropical Storm Nate headed west, threatening new areas of Mexico's gulf coast. Meanwhile, fishermen's groups reported at least a dozen fishermen aboard two Mexican shrimp boats went missing in the gulf Friday. Nate was still moving toward the coast slowly but was expected to pick up some speed Saturday, said the U.S. National Hurricane Center in Miami. Forecasters said the storm would approach the coast Sunday, most likely just below hurricane strength.
NEWS
July 27, 2008 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
It doesn't take much imagination to step from the Center City sidewalk into a piece of the French Quarter. Just give a little blink as you stroll down 12th Street north of Sansom, pull the door handle, and head into Les Bons Temps. Inside the elegant facade, where the name of a long-gone florist, H.H. Battles, is still scrolled in stained glass above the door, you could be inside a Bourbon Street Creole palace. There's a grand staircase just beyond the bar that sweeps up to a mezzanine where tables perch behind wrought-iron-trimmed galleries.
FOOD
November 22, 2000 | By Jon Caroulis, FOR THE INQUIRER
The boss assigned Gina Stuardi this task: Make a Bloody Mary that's spicy - but don't use horseradish. That's akin to saying make me a pizza, but don't use cheese, dough or tomato sauce. "[The owner] hated horseradish, so I had to come up with something else," said Stuardi, who tends bar at Marabella's, 401 City Ave., in Bala Cynwyd. "I love mustard. So I tried it, and he liked it. " She used a Dijon variety, along with Lee & Perrins Worcestershire sauce, Tabasco sauce, A-1 steak sauce and fresh ground pepper.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2000 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
Jim Hunt spent 12 years pursuing an acting career in New York. Of the small roles he won over time, none was for the part of a chef. Nor a restaurateur. Or even a barbecue-pit boss, for that matter. But that was acting. Real life for Hunt these days is the Hog's Head Tavern in Trevose. "My acting career was going so good that I ended up here, doing barbecue," Hunt said. Actually, life changed three years ago while he was walking in Greenwich Village. "I met my wife. " A short time later he fell in love again - with barbecue.
BUSINESS
January 15, 1999 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
A 30-second TV commercial for the Super Bowl costs $1.6 million these days. So you can bet sponsors want you to like their ads. Pepsi had the best-liked commercials in three out of the last four Super Bowls. Last year, instead of Pepsi, an exploding mosquito held more attraction for viewers, according to a study by the advertising research firm, Gallup & Robinson. The mosquito starred in a 30-second Tabasco commercial that showed the insect exploding after biting a man who put two bottles of Tabasco sauce on the sandwich he was eating.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1997 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hurricane Emeril - that's Emeril Lagasse, the chef and TV Food Network host - has blown into town. If Monday night's crowd at the Barnes & Noble store in Marlton is any indication, Lagasse is one hot dude. More than 600 people snaked around the stacks, and Lagasse wouldn't leave until he had signed copies of his new cookbook, Emeril's Creole Christmas, for everyone - four hours of scribbling. Yesterday, he hosted a sold-out cooking demonstration at Chef's Market on South Street for 200 people who paid $45 a head.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|