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NEWS
June 23, 1988 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Special to The Inquirer
Two employees of Health Care Services Inc., a Bala Cynwyd mail order pharmacy, were arrested last Thursday after they had stolen about 10,000 Valium tablets from the company warehouse, police said. Willie Crawford, 35, of the 1300 block of Hunting Park Avenue, Philadelphia, and Glenda Darby, 19, of the 5300 block of Morse Street, Philadelphia, were charged with criminal conspiracy, theft of movable property, theft by receiving stolen property and possession of a narcotic with the intent to distribute.
NEWS
July 11, 2011 | By Jeff Gelles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia Media Network will soon start selling deeply discounted Android tablet computers packaged with four applications that will display digital versions of its two newspapers, The Inquirer and the Daily News, as well as additional content from The Inquirer and the company's Philly.com website. In a meeting Monday morning with employees at the company's Conshohocken printing plant, Greg Osberg, chief executive officer and publisher, said the digital initiative would break ground in the industry, which has been struggling to maintain revenues as consumers gradually shift their reading preferences from print publications to computers, smartphones, and other digital devices.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2012
THESE kids today! All they want to do is play with your iPhone or iPad. So why stop them? If you're smart about it, you can safely start educating the little ones in their strollers with one of those smarty devices or a dedicated children's tablet. M-Edge Supershell cases for the iPhone 4 & 4S, iPod Touch and iPad 2 (and newer) tablets offer an ultraprotective foam surround that absorbs shocks. "Go ahead drop it on the concrete, repeatedly," dared a demonstrator. Priced from $25 to $35, Supershells come in lots of bright colors.
NEWS
March 8, 1992 | By Robert F. O'Neill, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Blame it on a potato truck and a creaky covered bridge that once carried Baltimore Pike traffic across Crum Creek between Springfield and Nether Providence. The Plush Mill Bridge, as it was known, had served the pike's horse and carriage trade for more than 100 years, but by 1920 it had been declared too fragile for heavier motor vehicles by the Keystone Automobile Club. The club was right. That same year, the bridge collapsed under the weight of a truck laden with potatoes.
NEWS
August 13, 1992 | By Dave Urbanski, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Trying not to sound too morbid, Deptford Councilman Kenneth Gewertz predicted who might attend his funeral. "Honestly, a lot of people will come to my funeral to make sure I'm really dead," Gewertz, a Democrat, said with a chuckle. "I mean, there are going to be a lot of people studying that casket!" Back at work after suffering a heart attack July 9, Gewertz, a colorful and sometimes volatile politician, had plenty of time to think about his life and his friends. "It's been said that if a man has more than one good friend, he is wealthy," Gewertz said in an interview Friday afternoon.
NEWS
June 18, 1995 | By Howard Goodman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Any decade now, the Sumerian Dictionary of the University Museum of the University of Pennsylvania will be finished. "Some days they ask me," Ake Sjoberg says, "which volume do I want for a memorial?" Sjoberg, an elfin 70, laughs. He doubts he'll ever see the completed product. The landmark effort to create the first dictionary of the earliest written language - dead for a couple of thousand years and read today by only about 100 people worldwide - is slow-going work. Letter B, chosen as the first volume because of its relative brevity, was started in 1976.
NEWS
August 6, 2002 | By Amy Worden and Marc Schogol INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
State officials outlined yesterday how they will distribute free potassium iodide pills to one million people who live or work near nuclear power plants to protect them from thyroid cancer in the event that radiation is released. Beginning Aug. 15, about 964,000 residents and workers within 10 miles of the nuclear plants - the Limerick plant in Montgomery County and four other plants in the state - will be able to pick up the free tablets for six days at several locations, said state Health Secretary Robert Zimmerman.
BUSINESS
May 15, 1987 | By Ron Wolf, Inquirer Staff Writer
Du Pont Co. issued a nationwide recall yesterday for one batch of its 7.5- milligram Coumadin tablets. The prescription drug is an anticoagulant commonly used to treat heart patients and others at risk from blot clots. Du Pont said that it detected oversized tablets in one lot of Coumadin numbered YO 244B. If taken, these tablets "would represent a significant overdose" that might result in hemorrhaging, the company warned. At the same time, the company advised that patients continue taking their prescribed medication.
NEWS
June 30, 1988 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Special to The Inquirer
Charges of attempting to purchase a narcotic with the intent to distribute were filed against two South Philadelphia men after police said they tried to buy 2,000 tablets of the painkiller Dilaudid from an undercover Montgomery County detective. According to an affidavit of probable cause filed by the detective, Raymond Kuter, Daniel Leone, 42, of the 1800 block of South Mole Street and Andrew Altieri, 33, of the 800 block of Mildred Street, met with Kuter and a third man, known only as "Joe" in the parking lot of the Bala Cynwyd Shopping Center last Thursday.
NEWS
April 7, 1988 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Pennsauken pharmacy mishandled tens of thousands of tablets of narcotic drugs over more than 18 months, according to a civil lawsuit filed by the federal government in U.S. District Court in Camden. "We claimed it wasn't our fault," said Robert Bliss, owner of Penn Family Pharmacy Inc. at Route 130 and Federal Street. Bliss said the problem had been straightened out and was the fault of poor record-keeping by the "warehouseman. " But Bliss declined to provide more details, and the store's attorney, Carl Poplar, could not be reached for comment yesterday.
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NEWS
May 11, 2015 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The visitor who was run over and killed by a Ride the Ducks vehicle Friday in Chinatown has been identified as Elizabeth Karnicki, 68, of Beaumont, Texas, police said. Police also said a witness reported seeing the victim walking while looking at an electronic tablet and crossing the street against a red light just before she was hit. The duck boat - an amphibious boat and street vehicle - was westbound on Arch Street toward the busy intersection at 11th Street about 5:20 p.m. when it struck Karnicki.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2014 | By Eileen Glanton Loftus, For The Inquirer
Caitlin Zielinski, 10, thought she wanted a phone for Christmas. She did online research to find models that would meet her requirements - she could text, call, and play games like Be Funky and Skyburger - while acknowledging her parents' - they could tighten the reins if she texted too much or tried to download unapproved apps. Ultimately, Caitlin decided she didn't want to deal with monthly bills, so she revised her Christmas wishes: A laptop is now at the top of her list. Not all children are as likely to weigh the pros and cons of their technological gifts-to-be.
BUSINESS
May 2, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a bid to attract younger crowds, Greenwood Gaming & Entertainment Inc. is planning to introduce gambling on smartphones and tablets at Parx Casino in Bensalem. "The idea is to try to expand our business, create more revenue both for us and the state by offering something that would appeal to a whole new generation of slots players," John Dixon, Greenwood's chief technology officer, said Wednesday at a Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board hearing in Harrisburg. Greenwood Gaming's attorney, Alan C. Kohler of Eckert Seamans, told the board that the company would like to file a petition in the next three to six months seeking permission to introduce a system called betcloud.
BUSINESS
October 25, 2013 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
What do you do if you have more than $145 billion in cash on hand - enough, say, to pay off Detroit's bankruptcy nearly eight times over? If you're Apple, you use some to update much of your product line in time for the holidays. You build on your lead in some areas, and answer competitors' advances in others. Oh, and you cut your laptop and desktop prices by a couple hundred bucks, and start giving away key software. Apple's pitch has always been that it charges more for premium products built around an integrated hardware-software ecosystem.
NEWS
July 30, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Delaware River Port Authority is spending twice the original cost estimate to buy iPads for its top officials. The 26 electronic tablets for DRPA commissioners and senior staffers will cost $17,995, according to a memo sent to Gov. Christie's office Friday. A DRPA spokesman had said earlier this month that the cost was expected to be about $9,000. The difference was attributed to more people getting iPads than originally anticipated, spokesman Tim Ireland said Friday. The iPads will replace paper agendas and reports delivered monthly to 16 commissioners and to senior staffers and administration officials in Pennsylvania and New Jersey.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2013
The Riddle of the Labyrinth The Quest to Crack an Ancient Code By Margalit Fox Ecco Press/HarperCollins. 384 pp. $27.99 Reviewed by Richard Di Dio   If George Smith, the 19th-century Assyriologist, supposedly stripped and ran screaming with excitement through the British Museum upon finally translating the Epic of Gilgamesh , what might happen with a translation exponentially more difficult?...
NEWS
April 12, 2013
ON SATURDAY, Microsoft opens a pop-up-style specialty store at the King of Prussia Mall, offering a "curated selection" of Windows PCs and tablets, Surface PC/tablet hybrids, Xboxes, Kinect peripherals, games, software, mice, keyboards and more. Samsung is going the trendy, store-within-a-store route with Samsung Experience Shops inside Best Buy. starting this week at the stores on Bethlehem Pike in Montgomeryville and Roosevelt Boulevard in Northeast Philly. This Experience will expand in the next week or two to Best Buys around the region.
BUSINESS
February 15, 2013 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Microsoft's new Surface Pro is tough to pigeonhole. Is it a tablet that doubles as a laptop? A teeny laptop that doubles as a tablet? An upgrade to last fall's Surface RT that runs actual Windows 8? A svelte solution to the age-old hassle of taking work home or on a plane? On the surface, here's the Pro: an $899 tablet that, with a couple nifty add-ons, morphs into a $1,100 micro-laptop. With its sharp, HD display and Windows 8's "live tile" apps, the touch-screen tablet will keep its owner engaged for four or five hours without a power cord.
BUSINESS
January 9, 2013 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
LAS VEGAS - Nearly six years after Apple's iPhone turned the smartphone into a hub of the high-tech universe, mobile technology continues to capture an outsize share of a trillion-dollar global consumer-tech market. But this year's Consumer Electronics Show, which opens here Tuesday, demonstrates that the focus on mobile apps hasn't slowed innovations of every variety. Reports on the eve of CES 2013 showed that spending on smartphones and tablets continued to surge everywhere in 2012, even as Europe struggled with a recession, U.S. growth sagged, and sales of single-function devices such as cameras and GPS units slumped - cannibalized by the growing capacities of apps on mobile devices.
NEWS
December 30, 2012 | By Jason Straziuso, Associated Press
WENCHI, Ethiopia - The children in this village wear filthy, ragged clothes. They sleep beside cows and sheep in huts made of sticks and mud. They have no school. Yet they all can chant the English alphabet, and some can make words. The key to their success: 20 tablet computers dropped off in their village in February by a U.S. group called One Laptop Per Child. The goal is to find out whether kids using today's technology can teach themselves to read in places where no schools or teachers exist.
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