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ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2011
THE GIZMO: While a certain Mr. Jobs opines that tablet computers work right in only one size, other makers see a competitive market developing in small, medium and larger (i.e., Apple iPad) sizes. We certainly see the logic in a trio of new models we've been testing from BlackBerry, T-Mobile/LG and Acer. SCREEN GEMS: While clearly a work in progress (with software upgrades appearing every few days), the 7-inch-screen BlackBerry PlayBook from Research In Motion already has a whole lot going for it. It's proven to be my favorite among the three new tablet computers I've been testing.
NEWS
May 13, 2011 | By David Sarno, Los Angeles Times (MCT)
LOS ANGELES - There was a time when Steve Mehta was on his laptop nonstop. Nowadays, he hardly touches it. The 43-year-old attorney uses his tablet computer to highlight legal briefs, take notes for court cases or flip though a digital version of the California probate code. "The laptop is so limited," Mehta he said as he stood against the wall of a crammed Los Angeles subway car, watching an episode of Modern Family on his tablet. "But everything you want to do, this thing does.
NEWS
January 10, 2011
Prostate-cancer patients fare better with exercise While there is no one-size-fits-all treatment for prostate cancer, new research suggests there may be a universal supplement to treatment: exercise. The authors of the report, published online last week in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, used a research database of 51,529 men whose health and habits had been tracked for 18 years; 2,705 were diagnosed with prostate cancer during that time and deemed appropriate for analysis.
NEWS
September 22, 2010
Endo Pharmaceuticals Holdings Inc., of Chadds Ford, said today that the Food and Drug Administration had granted priority review status for a new formulation of Oxymorphone, a pain medication. The new formulation is for a long-acting tablet that is crush-resistant, to thwart non-medical abuse and accidental overdoses. It is designed for "the treatment of moderate to severe chronic pain in patients requiring continuous, around-the-clock opioid treatment for an extended period of time," the company said.
NEWS
May 19, 2010 | By Nathan Gorenstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia doctor Ronald S. Brown was sentenced Wednesday to 10 years in prison for giving thousands of people illegal prescriptions for painkillers and tranquilizers in 2008 and 2009. At times, the supposed patients were lined up on the sidewalk outside his Germantown home, from which he illegally prescribed nearly 50,000 doses of OxyContin, Percocet and Xanax, according to Assistant U.S. Attorney Pamela Foa. It was the second time Brown, 60, was sentenced for illegally distributing medical drugs.
NEWS
January 10, 2010 | By John Timpane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's the most eagerly awaited tablet since Moses. As with the tablets handed down from on high, no one knows what's on it. Or even what it is. They know only that it's coming. Loud is the hype surrounding what's popularly called the "Apple tablet. " Many observers, including Ken Doctor, news-industry analyst for Outsell Inc., expects it to be "a 10-inch tablet with features like an iPhone, big enough so I can actually read easily. " Bloggers and media snoops claim it will, in unprecedented, cosmos-rocking ways, combine popular applications (Web?
NEWS
August 19, 2004 | By Susan Perloff
Susan Perloff lives and writes in Philadelphia At the time of her suicide five years ago, my mother had taken her seventh Paxil tablet. Until that moment, no one knew she was suicidal. Even the doctor who wrote the prescription was surprised she took her life. She died on a Friday in August, at home, alone, with every detail perfectly planned. She arranged for her husband to eat lunch with a colleague, strongly suggesting a particular restaurant some distance from home. So she had plenty of time.
NEWS
August 6, 2002 | By Amy Worden and Marc Schogol INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
State officials outlined yesterday how they will distribute free potassium iodide pills to one million people who live or work near nuclear power plants to protect them from thyroid cancer in the event that radiation is released. Beginning Aug. 15, about 964,000 residents and workers within 10 miles of the nuclear plants - the Limerick plant in Montgomery County and four other plants in the state - will be able to pick up the free tablets for six days at several locations, said state Health Secretary Robert Zimmerman.
NEWS
July 22, 2002 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The people known as Sumerians are credited with starting the first civilization and building the first settlements worthy of being called cities. They also invented writing, and then they wrote and wrote and wrote, filling millions of tablets with their intricate, detailed characters. They left behind everything from religious texts to poetry to receipts, much of which remains preserved 5,000 years later. Understanding the symbols they etched in clay is another matter. The oldest language known left no descendants.
NEWS
June 15, 2002 | By Cassio Furtado INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The Drug Enforcement Administration is expanding its operations in the Netherlands to curb that country's exports of the fashionable but illegal drug ecstasy, Director Asa Hutchinson said yesterday. At the same time, the DEA is reducing its presence in Thailand, whose role in world heroin traffic is declining, Hutchinson said. Both moves are part of the DEA chief's efforts to do more with less as Washington focuses its attention on the war on terrorism and away from its long-standing war on drugs.
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