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Tacony

NEWS
October 27, 2013 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Beatrice Weston's mother claims her daughter was held captive and tortured by her aunt Linda Ann Weston because the City of Philadelphia failed to keep her safe. In a lawsuit filed last week in federal court, the latest installment in the horrific abuse case out of Tacony, Vickie Weston says the Department of Human Services knew her sister was a convicted murderer, but nevertheless gave her custody of 10-year-old Beatrice Weston. Then, social workers failed to check on the girl for a decade as her aunt forced her into prostitution, beat and starved her, kept her out of school, and even made her drink and bathe in her own urine, the suit alleges.
NEWS
November 4, 1987 | By Murray Dubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A look at key black divisions and wards where campaign strategists for Mayor Goode expected victories of 95 percent or better show that the vote exceeded their expectations. Many political strategists believed that Goode would receive as much as 98 percent of the black vote. Winning that level of support in the black community was thought to be essential to Goode's chances because of the belief that his Republican challenger, Frank L. Rizzo, would capture the lion's share of the white vote.
NEWS
July 21, 2013 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
HANNAH KARENA Jones, 23, still has vivid childhood memories of wondering about Byberry State Hospital when her parents drove her past it on Roosevelt Boulevard as the family headed to the Palace Roller Skating Center. Jones, who grew up in Langhorne, remembers asking about one especially grim-looking building behind the spiked iron fence. Her mother, whose college psychology professor had been a Byberry doctor, told her: "They did lobotomies there. " "I was always interested in what went on with the patients behind those walls," Jones said.
NEWS
August 26, 2013 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
AS HURRICANE IRENE blew toward Philadelphia on Aug. 27, 2011, bringing floods, power outages and property devastation, hundreds of people hurried to the Max Myers Recreation Center in Castor Gardens for the first Northeast Celebration. It was then that Jared Solomon, president of the Take Back Your Neighborhood community association that organized the celebration of all things Northeast Philadelphia, knew he had created something stronger than the approaching storm. No such natural disaster threatens the third annual Northeast Celebration today at Max Myers Rec, on Hellerman Street near Horrocks.
NEWS
December 11, 2008 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The double slaying of 15-year-old Timothy Clark and family friend Damien Holloway, 27, on July 13, 2007, was among three deaths and six shootings on an extraordinarily violent evening during one of Philadelphia's most deadly summers. The early-morning execution-style killings in Tacony were particularly puzzling. There was a considerable difference in the victims' ages, and Clark was white and Holloway black. Yesterday, a Philadelphia judge heard witnesses testify that Holloway was shot to death by Gerald Drummond because of his race and because he'd "disrespected" Drummond's sister, with whom Holloway had a child and a volatile relationship.
NEWS
September 10, 1992 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
The changes time has brought are profound indeed at that historic institution in Northeast Philadelphia that first opened its gates in 1857 as St. Vincent's Orphans Asylum. "St. Vincent's is no longer the traditional orphange where children plant roots, remaining as wards of the orphange through their adolescent years," explained its administrator, Sister Kathleen Reilly. "Children here today, ranging in age from 2 through 12, aren't necessarily orphans. Many are abused, abandoned, the innocent victims of a society which abuses them through drugs and alcohol," continued Sister Kathleen, a member of the School Sisters of Notre Dame.
NEWS
June 6, 2003 | By Martha Woodall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For years the Philadelphia School District has been plagued by teacher vacancies. But yesterday, as the district presented a spiffy new Teacher Welcome Center, officials declared that an aggressive new strategy to recruit and retain teachers was already showing results. "We are very excited," chief executive Paul Vallas said. "We think we are going to have a banner year when it comes to identifying, securing and recruiting certified teacher candidates. " The city school system seeks as many as 600 teachers and has already received more than 800 applications.
SPORTS
April 4, 2014 | BY AARON CARTER, Daily News Staff Writer cartera@phillynews.com
WHEN YOU'RE at home plate and a baseball barrels toward your head, the smart thing to do is to get out of the way. Ah, but when the pitcher aims his curveball at your ear and the ball breaks over the plate, a bailing batter can emerge red-faced if the pitch is a strike. Marcus Jimenez, a junior for Maritime Academy, knows that feeling well. Jimenez typically plays rightfield but usually yields to a designated hitter because he's been a flincher at the plate. "I just always think it's gonna hit me so I just don't want to take that hit," said a smiling Jimenez, yesterday's unlikely hero.
NEWS
July 12, 1999 | By Clea Benson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It is a rainy day in Wissinoming, and there is nothing but mud where a block of houses stood just days ago. City Councilwoman Joan Krajewski watches a bulldozer combing through the dirt. She looks over at an empty orange stuccoed house where lace curtains are still hanging in the windows and small plastic Fourth of July flags are still fluttering outside. "Isn't that pretty?" she asks in her well-known raspy voice. "That has to come down, too. " As the Sixth District councilwoman, Krajewski has spent two decades specializing in providing city services to her constituents - who have always come to her for everything from better police patrols to handicapped parking stickers to zoning changes.
NEWS
November 11, 1990 | By Larry King, Inquirer Staff Writer
For once, Democrats have survived an election without losing ground in Northeast Philadelphia. In Tuesday's balloting, the party even managed to pick up two legislative seats covering parts of the Northeast. By a surprisingly comfortable margin, Democrat Michael McGeehan defeated Republican Joseph McHugh for the open House of Representatives seat in District 173. After a bitter, expensive campaign, McGeehan piled up 55 percent of the vote to claim the post that five-term GOP incumbent Frances Weston is vacating.
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