FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
June 11, 1989 | By Marian Uhlman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Long gone are the heady days at the research laboratories where SmithKline Beckman Corp. identified a major new ulcer medication 15 years ago. Welwyn, a SmithKline research-and-development site and the home of Tagamet, has struggled to become a home for something else - anything else. A number of drug compounds discovered here could be ready for the market within a few years to quench the dry spell that has stymied the researchers and contributed to SmithKline's general malaise.
BUSINESS
May 26, 1989 | By Marian Uhlman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sales of Tagamet, the most important product of SmithKline Beckman Corp., have continued to erode this year, the company said in documents filed this week with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Tagamet, the ulcer drug whose introduction sent SmithKline sales soaring, lost ground to competitors in the U.S. market in the first quarter. In the category of ulcer medications that Tagamet once dominated, its share of the market was just over 37 percent in the first quarter, down nearly eight percentage points from the first quarter of 1988.
BUSINESS
October 27, 1986 | By Ron Wolf, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tagamet, the anti-ulcer drug made by SmithKline Beckman Corp., is about to pass a marketing milestone. No prescription drug has ever recorded annual sales of $1 billion. This year, Tagamet will achieve that distinction, according to Henry Wendt, president of the Philadelphia company. Nevertheless, all is not well for SmithKline or its flagship product. For several years, there has been some doubt among industry analysts whether Tagamet would ever make it to $1 billion. Since sales hit the $900 million level in 1983, SmithKline has encountered unusual difficulty in boosting the use of the drug - source of more than half its profits.
BUSINESS
July 29, 1994 | by Anita Rodriguez, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News wire services contributed to this report
SmithKline Beecham was dealt a second setback yesterday in its regulatory quest to turn its prescription ulcer drug Tagamet into an over-the-counter treatment for heartburn. Two panels of advisers to the Food and Drug Administration recommended against approving the drug for OTC sale, saying they were concerned it might react with other drugs patients might be taking. In September, the panels also recommended against over-the-counter-sales, saying tests did not show it to be effective for episodic heartburn.
BUSINESS
May 1, 1986 | By Gilbert M. Gaul, Inquirer Staff Writer
The battle between the producers of the two largest-selling ulcer medications is heating up. SmithKline Beckman Corp., whosee once-untouchable lead in the anti-ulcer market has shrunk under intense competition, yesterday said it had received federal approval to offer Tagamet in once-a-day dosage form. The decision is expected to help the pharmaceutical maker in its competition with Glaxo Holdings P.L.C., the manufacturer of Zantac, the second most widely prescribed anti-ulcer drug after Tagamet.
BUSINESS
December 11, 1989 | By Marian Uhlman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tagamet, the ulcer drug that enriched SmithKline Beckman Corp. by billions of dollars, may possess untapped wonders that go far beyond stomach-related disorders, researchers say. A growing volume of independent medical research suggests that the 14-year- old ulcer medication may be a versatile tool to help fight such diseases as cancer, AIDS, herpes and other illnesses. As one of the pharmaceutical industry's most studied drugs, Tagamet has been the subject of more than 500 controlled studies and it has been written about more than 14,000 times in medical journals.
BUSINESS
September 10, 1993 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
SmithKline Beecham encountered a setback yesterday as it tried to make the case that its widely used ulcer drug should be made available without a prescription for treatment of heartburn. SmithKline asked the Food and Drug Administration for permission to sell a milder version of cimetidine, also known by the brand name Tagamet, over the counter. But at an all-day hearing yesterday, two FDA committees said that while the milder Tagamet appeared to be safe enough to use without a prescription, they were not convinced that SmithKline had proven that the drug was effective in treating heartburn and related symptoms.
BUSINESS
July 29, 1994 | By Donna Shaw, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
SmithKline Beecham will have to wait a while longer to get its popular prescription ulcer drug, Tagamet, on the market as an over-the-counter remedy for heartburn. Two Food and Drug Administration advisory committees yesterday recommended against immediate approval of the application, saying they were concerned that Tagamet might cause adverse reactions in people taking certain other medicines. Cited in particular were theophylline, used to treat asthma, and the insomnia drug Halcion.
BUSINESS
May 21, 1991 | By Marian Uhlman, Inquirer Staff Writer
SmithKline Beecham has a new use for Tagamet, its blockbuster anti-ulcer drug: treating lesions of the esophagus. The pharmaceutical firm said yesterday that it had received U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval to market the medicine to heal erosive esophagitis. The problem is a severe form of gastroesophageal reflux disease. In its milder form, the disease is recognized as heartburn, but it can lead to serious ulceration in the esophagus caused by stomach acid.
NEWS
December 24, 2012 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: I had an EKG done in 2009 that said I had possible left atrial enlargement. Another EKG done at a different hospital in the same month said I had left atrial abnormality. I saw a cardiologist who did an echocardiogram of my heart and said I did not have left atrial enlargement. I'm completely puzzled! Can you help? Answer: An EKG uses the electrical activity of the heart to look for such things as the heart's rate, rhythm, signs of impaired electrical conduction, prior heart attacks, current injury to heart muscle, and possible enlargement of one or more chambers.
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NEWS
December 24, 2012 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: I had an EKG done in 2009 that said I had possible left atrial enlargement. Another EKG done at a different hospital in the same month said I had left atrial abnormality. I saw a cardiologist who did an echocardiogram of my heart and said I did not have left atrial enlargement. I'm completely puzzled! Can you help? Answer: An EKG uses the electrical activity of the heart to look for such things as the heart's rate, rhythm, signs of impaired electrical conduction, prior heart attacks, current injury to heart muscle, and possible enlargement of one or more chambers.
NEWS
June 26, 2006 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dick Jones, 78, of Gladwyne, a prominent graphic designer who volunteered his talents to his community, died June 11 from a head injury at Rhode Island Hospital in Providence. He had fallen June 4 while attending the annual meeting of the Rhode Island School of Design Alumni Council. Mr. Jones retired in 1992 after a 40-year-career but continued to design, his wife, Christine Guarino Jones said. He edited and was creative director of The First 300: The Amazing and Rich History of Lower Merion, published in 2000; designed promotional material for Philadelphia Hospitality; designed newsletters and graphics for ElderNet of Lower Merion/Narberth; and designed material for the Lower Merion Historical Society and Gladwyne Free Library.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2000 | By Susan Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After months of delays, British drugmakers Glaxo Wellcome P.L.C. and SmithKline Beecham P.L.C. said yesterday that the U.S. Federal Trade Commission had approved their $74 billion merger. The FTC said it would continue to review the effects of the merger on the market for products that help people quit smoking, but it did not require the companies to divest products in that market. The companies now face one last government hurdle, a review tomorrow by Britain's High Court.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2000 | By Andrea Knox, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
SmithKline Beecham P.L.C., which is in the midst of merging with Glaxo Wellcome P.L.C., agreed yesterday to pay $1.24 billion for Block Drug Co., the Jersey City-based maker of Sensodyne toothpaste and Polident denture cleanser. The purchase "will significantly enhance SB's consumer health-care business, which is a key part of our strategy for corporate growth," SmithKline's chief executive officer, Jean-Pierre Garnier, said in a prepared statement. SmithKline's consumer brands include Aquafresh toothpaste, Tums antacid, and Nicorette and Nicoderm antismoking aids.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1995 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
A weaker, non-prescription form of the popular anti-ulcer drug Tagamet will be on supermarket shelves soon following its approval yesterday by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for over-the-counter sale. Its approval as a treatment for occasional heartburn had been widely expected since an FDA advisory committee in March recommended Tagamet be made available without a prescription at lower doses. Tagamet's manufacturer, SmithKline Beecham PLC, plans to announce the FDA approval today of Tagamet HB. Tagamet HB follows Pepcid AC Acid Controller as the second stomach-acid- reduction drug to win FDA over-the-counter approval.
BUSINESS
July 29, 1994 | By Donna Shaw, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
SmithKline Beecham will have to wait a while longer to get its popular prescription ulcer drug, Tagamet, on the market as an over-the-counter remedy for heartburn. Two Food and Drug Administration advisory committees yesterday recommended against immediate approval of the application, saying they were concerned that Tagamet might cause adverse reactions in people taking certain other medicines. Cited in particular were theophylline, used to treat asthma, and the insomnia drug Halcion.
BUSINESS
July 29, 1994 | by Anita Rodriguez, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News wire services contributed to this report
SmithKline Beecham was dealt a second setback yesterday in its regulatory quest to turn its prescription ulcer drug Tagamet into an over-the-counter treatment for heartburn. Two panels of advisers to the Food and Drug Administration recommended against approving the drug for OTC sale, saying they were concerned it might react with other drugs patients might be taking. In September, the panels also recommended against over-the-counter-sales, saying tests did not show it to be effective for episodic heartburn.
NEWS
May 20, 1994 | by Becky Batcha, Daily News Staff Writer
Ulcers started flaring up as an item of medical interest this February, when the National Institutes of Health announced that these fires in the belly were caused by bacteria, not stress. It turns out that you can cure them with antibiotics. The news was a belch heard round the world in the field of gastroenterology. More than 4 million Americans whose stomach pain was being managed long-term with drugs stood to have their digestive tracts fixed for good in two weeks flat. Then, last Tuesday, ulcers became a burning issue in international business, when U.S. patent protection expired for Tagamet, sending the pharmaceuticals industry into a frenzy.
BUSINESS
May 14, 1994 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
SmithKline Beecham announced yesterday that it had settled a patent and trademark-infringement lawsuit filed against two companies over Tagamet, SmithKline's peptic ulcer medicine. SmithKline filed the lawsuit earlier this week in federal court in Philadelphia, naming as defendants Novopharm USA, a pharmaceuticals manufacturer, and Schein Pharmaceutical Inc., which has agreed to distribute Novopharm's generic cimetidine tablets. Cimetidine is the active component of Tagamet. "We are pleased with this outcome, and we will continue to protect our rights when necessary," said Jerry Karabelas, president of SmithKline Beecham Pharmaceuticals-North America.
BUSINESS
April 25, 1994 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Five years ago, Henry Wendt looked tired, even haggard, as he emerged from months of merger talks that won a suitor for SmithKline Beckman Corp., of Philadelphia. Then he faced a skeptical financial community and a nervous workforce that didn't know what to make of the transatlantic deal with Beecham Group, of Britain. And they wouldn't know for quite some time. Now, as Wendt clears out his spacious corner office and prepares to sever his SmithKline Beecham ties, the company chairman is confident that he made good on his promise to create a firm that would compete "effectively and efficiently, not only in the United States but in the changing European market and expanding economies of Japan and the Pacific Basin.
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