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Tahrir Square

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NEWS
March 17, 2011 | Associated Press
CAIRO - Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton waded into crowds Wednesday at the symbolic heart of the uprising that toppled Egypt's longtime autocratic leader, urging the country's temporary leaders not to allow the revolution to fizzle or be compromised by extremists. As the Obama administration sharpened its criticism of Bahrain's crackdown on protesters, Clinton heaped praise on Egypt's antigovernment demonstrators whose peaceful protests in central Tahrir Square ousted President Hosni Mubarak last month.
NEWS
November 26, 2011 | By Hamza Hendawi and Sarah el-Deeb, Associated Press
CAIRO - The United States increased pressure Friday on Egypt's military rulers to hand over power to civilian leaders, and the generals turned to a Mubarak-era politician to head a new government in a move that failed to satisfy the more than 100,000 protesters who jammed Tahrir Square in the biggest rally yet this week. The demonstrators rejected the appointment of Kamal el-Ganzouri as prime minister, breaking into chants of "Illegitimate! Illegitimate!" and setting up a showdown between the two sides only three days before key parliamentary elections.
NEWS
February 4, 2011 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
When she first traveled to Cairo for fieldwork in 1993, Farha Ghannam recalled, Tahrir Square was mostly used as a bus depot. Today, it's the battleground on which the future of Egypt is being fought - a space rich with symbolism and meaning, held and defended by protesters at the cost of some lives. "There's this feeling [among demonstrators] that 'if we lose at Tahrir Square, we're going to lose the fight,' " said Ghannam, an anthropology professor at Swarthmore College who studies the use of public space in Egypt.
NEWS
July 17, 2011 | By Sarah El Deeb, Associated Press
CAIRO - A member of Egypt's ruling military council on Saturday briefly visited a protest camp in a central Cairo square, but left after protesters, some holding up shoes in anger, booed him off a stage. Maj. Gen. Tarek el-Mahdi had come to Tahrir Square to persuade a dozen demonstrators to end a hunger strike they began several days ago, but was forced to cut short his visit because of the heckling. Mahdi told state TV he was disappointed that a small crowd of protesters managed to drive him out of the square before he could reach the tent housing the hunger strikers.
NEWS
November 27, 2011 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Drexel University student who was arrested by Egyptian police after he allegedly threw Molotov cocktails during a pro-democracy protest has been released from the police station where he had been in custody, his attorney said Friday. Theodore Simon, a Philadelphia lawyer representing the family of Gregory Porter, said that "certain necessary administrative steps" that precluded Porter's release from police custody had been resolved and that he expected his client to be on his way home "very soon.
NEWS
April 9, 2011 | Associated Press
CAIRO - Egypt's protesters stepped up their challenge to the country's ruling military yesterday, as tens of thousands massed to demand that it prosecute ousted President Hosni Mubarak and his family for alleged corruption. Meanwhile, a smaller group tested out the army's tolerance with a march on Israel's embassy. The mass rally in Cairo's central Tahrir Square was the biggest by protesters in weeks, and hundreds remaining there shortly before midnight said they were planning to camp out overnight.
NEWS
February 12, 2013 | By Sarah El Deeb and Amir Makar, Associated Press
CAIRO - Security forces sprayed protesters with water hoses and tear gas outside the presidential palace Monday as Egyptians marked the second anniversary of the fall of autocrat Hosni Mubarak with angry demonstrations against his elected successor. The forces were trying to disperse a small crowd of protesters after some of them attempted to cross a barbed-wire barrier meant to block them from the palace gate. Some protesters chanted: "The people want to bring down the regime. " Others threw stones.
NEWS
November 24, 2011 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. consul general in Cairo met Wednesday with the three American students accused of throwing firebombs from a rooftop during pro-democracy protests in Tahrir Square. The three, including Drexel University student Gregory Porter, 19, of Glenside, were arrested Monday by Egypt's military. "They are safe and being treated well," Drexel president John A. Fry said in a statement after being briefed about the Cairo meeting. The students were questioned by Egyptian authorities, said Fry, "but no charges have been filed.
NEWS
February 17, 2011 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
CAIRO - The air of hopefulness is so palpable in Egypt's capital city - as people try to digest what happened to them during their revolution - that it's easy to become a dreamer. This is Egypt's interregnum of hope, a period that comes just after "people power" ousted a dictator, but before the meaning of the revolution has become truly clear. At this point, it's still possible to imagine that Egypt might produce the first democracy the Arab world has known. My Egyptair flight from New York to Cairo was full of young professionals and families eager to get home and feel the difference for themselves.
NEWS
July 5, 2013 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
The Arab Spring has come full circle. Two years ago, huge crowds in Tahrir Square called for the removal of a military-backed dictator and for democratic elections. Today, opposition crowds in the same square are cheering the military's ouster of an elected government. So much for the popular appeal of electoral democracy! Opposition groups lay the blame for Egypt's ongoing economic and state collapse at the feet of ousted President Mohammed Morsi and his Muslim Brotherhood. The military has now put forward a road map for new elections, endorsed by the opposition.
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NEWS
January 27, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
This weekend marks the third anniversary of the Tahrir Square revolt in Egypt. It's hard to recall the incredible exhilaration of those days, which I witnessed firsthand: Facebook-savvy activists rallied millions to the square with calls to end police brutality and oust a military-backed dictator. In 36 months, the counterrevolution has come full circle. Several key leaders of the Jan. 25, 2011, protest, including the April 6 movement cofounder Ahmed Maher, have been sentenced to three years in jail - at hard labor.
NEWS
July 24, 2013 | By Maggie Michael and Tony G. Gabriel, Associated Press
CAIRO - The family of Mohammed Morsi furiously denounced the military Monday, accusing it of "kidnapping" him, and European diplomats urged that Egypt's first freely elected leader be released after being held incommunicado for nearly three weeks since being deposed by the army. The fate of Morsi, who has been held without charge, has become a focus of the political battle between his Muslim Brotherhood and the new military-backed government. The Brotherhood has tried to use Morsi's detention to rally the country to its side.
NEWS
July 21, 2013 | By Sarah El Deeb and Tony G. Gabriel, Associated Press
CAIRO - With the military beefing up security, tens of thousands took to the streets Friday in a determined push for the return to power of Egypt's ousted Islamist leader, while Mohammed Morsi's opponents staged rival rallies, raising fears of a fresh round of clashes. The army warned it wouldn't tolerate any violence and sent fighter jets screaming over the capital and helicopters hovering over the marches. Publicizing their protests for days, Morsi's supporters vowed that Friday would be decisive in their campaign to try to reverse the military's removal of the country's first democratically elected president after a year in office, following massive protests against him. Unlike other demonstrations held in the evening after breaking the daylong Ramadan fast, the pro-Morsi rallies took place throughout the day. Organized by the ousted president's Muslim Brotherhood party and dubbed "Breaking the Coup," they included marches in Cairo's streets, outside military installations, and in other cities, including Alexandria and several Nile Delta provinces.
NEWS
July 12, 2013 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Egypt's military coup against an elected president, cheered on by the country's liberals, once again raises the nagging question: Is the Middle East somehow unsuited for democracy? Two years after the Arab Spring, the answer is murky. But the ongoing drama in Egypt has made one thing clear. Unless religious and "secular" political parties are willing cooperate, no Arab democracy can last long. Unless they can integrate both Islamist and non-Islamist parties into their political systems, Arab states will either sink into chaos or revert to authoritarian rule.
NEWS
July 6, 2013 | By Abigail Hauslohner, Washington Post
CAIRO - Tahrir Square was largely empty Thursday. The smell of rotting garbage hung in the air. The crumpled banners, empty soda cans, and old corncobs of the Egyptians who had celebrated the ousting of their president lay smashed and strewn across the pavement. Those Egyptians who remained spoke of hopes for an "honest" president to replace the deposed Mohammed Morsi. They said they were optimistic that the military, bolstered by an uprising of millions, had given Egypt a new beginning - a chance to get the country's revolution right after 21/2 years of misfires.
NEWS
July 5, 2013 | By Hamza Hendawi, Maggie Michael, and Sarah El Deeb, Associated Press
CAIRO - Egypt's first democratically elected president was ousted Wednesday by the military after barely a year in office, felled by the same kind of popular revolt that brought him to power in the Arab Spring. The armed forces announced they would install a temporary civilian government to replace Islamist President Mohammed Morsi, who denounced the action as a "full coup" by the generals. They also suspended the Islamist-drafted constitution and called for new elections. Millions of anti-Morsi demonstrators in cities around the country erupted in scenes of joy after the televised announcement by the army chief.
NEWS
July 5, 2013 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
The Arab Spring has come full circle. Two years ago, huge crowds in Tahrir Square called for the removal of a military-backed dictator and for democratic elections. Today, opposition crowds in the same square are cheering the military's ouster of an elected government. So much for the popular appeal of electoral democracy! Opposition groups lay the blame for Egypt's ongoing economic and state collapse at the feet of ousted President Mohammed Morsi and his Muslim Brotherhood. The military has now put forward a road map for new elections, endorsed by the opposition.
NEWS
July 3, 2013
PRESCOTT, Ariz. - Trapped by a wildfire that exploded tenfold in a matter of hours, a crack team of firefighting "Hotshots" broke out their portable emergency shelters and rushed to climb into the foil-lined, heat-resistant bags before the flames swept over them. By the time the blaze had passed, 19 men lay dead in the nation's biggest loss of firefighters in a wildfire in 80 years. The tragedy Sunday evening all but wiped out the 20-member Granite Mountain Hotshots, a unit based in Prescott, authorities said yesterday as the last of the bodies were retrieved from the mountain in the town of Yarnell.
NEWS
July 2, 2013 | By Abigail Hauslohner, Washington Post
CAIRO - Hundreds of thousands of antigovernment protesters armed with flags, banners, and deafening waves of chants for President Mohammed Morsi's downfall packed into Tahrir Square and flooded the streets around Egypt's presidential palace Sunday, in the largest showing of opposition to the Islamist leader since he took office one year ago Sunday. Thousands of Morsi supporters, many of them from his Muslim Brotherhood party, filled another Cairo thoroughfare with their own chants of support.
NEWS
July 1, 2013 | Associated Press
CAIRO - Organizers of a mass protest against Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi claimed Saturday that more than 22 million people have signed their petition demanding the Islamist leader step down. The announcement adds to a sense of foreboding on the eve of opposition-led mass demonstrations that many fear could turn deadly and spin out of control, dragging the country into a dangerous round of political violence. The demonstrations planned for Sunday reflect the growing polarization of the nation since Morsi took power, with the president and his Islamist allies in one camp and seculars, liberals, moderate Muslims, and Christians on the other.
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