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Tahrir Square

NEWS
June 3, 2013 | By Suzan Fraser and Bulut Emiroglu, Associated Press
ISTANBUL, Turkey - Thousands of people flooded Istanbul's main square Saturday after a crackdown on antigovernment protests turned city streets into a battlefield clouded by tear gas. Though he offered some concessions to demonstrators, Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan remained largely defiant in the face of the biggest popular challenge to his power in a decade in office, insisting the protests are undemocratic and illegitimate. Public anger has flared among urban and secular Turks after police violently broke up an antidevelopment sit-in in the landmark Taksim Square, with protests spreading to dozens of other cities as demonstrators denounced what they see as Erdogan's increasingly authoritarian style.
NEWS
May 10, 2013 | By Maggie Michael, Associated Press
CAIRO - An assailant stabbed an American man on Thursday while they were standing outside the U.S. Embassy in Cairo, security officials said. The area around the U.S. Embassy has been the site of anti-American incidents and violence in the past, but stabbings are uncommon despite political unrest that has roiled Egypt since the 2011 uprising. Embassy spokesman David Ranz confirmed that a U.S. citizen was stabbed, and said he was immediately rushed to the hospital. His condition was not known.
NEWS
April 20, 2013 | By Sarah El Deeb and Maggie Michael, Associated Press
CAIRO - Supporters and opponents of Egypt's Islamist president battled in the streets near Tahrir Square on Friday as an Islamist rally demanding a purge of the judiciary devolved into violence. The rally centered on a contentious aspect of the country's deep political polarization - the courts. Islamist backers of President Mohammed Morsi say the judiciary is infused with former regime loyalists who are blocking his policies, while opponents fear Islamists want to take over the courts and get rid of secular-minded judges to consolidate the Muslim Brotherhood's power.
NEWS
April 6, 2013 | By Julia Rhodes, WILMINGTON FRIENDS SCHOOL
Most people use social media to connect with friends, share cat pictures, or perhaps play Farmville. But the young protesters who took to Tahrir Square on Jan. 25, 2011, found an essential use for these sites: Egyptians used Twitter and Facebook to orchestrate demonstrations against President Hosni Mubarak's autocracy. Dissidents used the Facebook page "We Are All Khaled Said" as a pivotal tool in the downfall of Mubarak. Protesters shared the plight of Khaled Said, a young activist who was arbitrarily arrested and killed by police.
NEWS
February 14, 2013 | By Brian Rohan, Associated Press
CAIRO - Egyptian women are growing increasingly angry and militant as they deal with one of the unintended consequences of the Arab Spring: an epidemic of sexual assault that law enforcement has failed to contain. The backlash, which includes self-defense courses for women and even threats of violent retaliation, is fueled by ultraconservative Islamists who suggest that women invite assault by attending antigovernment protests where they mix with men. At marches against sexual harassment in Cairo, women have brandished kitchen knives in the air. Stenciled drawings on building walls depict girls fighting off men with swords.
NEWS
February 12, 2013 | By Sarah El Deeb and Amir Makar, Associated Press
CAIRO - Security forces sprayed protesters with water hoses and tear gas outside the presidential palace Monday as Egyptians marked the second anniversary of the fall of autocrat Hosni Mubarak with angry demonstrations against his elected successor. The forces were trying to disperse a small crowd of protesters after some of them attempted to cross a barbed-wire barrier meant to block them from the palace gate. Some protesters chanted: "The people want to bring down the regime. " Others threw stones.
NEWS
February 1, 2013 | By Hamza Hendawi, Associated Press
CAIRO - With near impunity and the backing of the Islamist president, Egyptian police have been accused of firing wildly at protesters, beating them, and lashing out with deadly force in clashes across much of the country in the last week, regaining their Hosni Mubarak-era notoriety as a tool of repression. In the process, nearly 60 people have been killed and hundreds injured, and the security forces have reemerged as a significant political player after spending the two years since Mubarak's ouster on the sidelines, sulking or unwilling to fully take back the streets.
NEWS
January 29, 2013 | By Maggie Michael, Associated Press
CAIRO - An unpredictable new element has entered Egypt's wave of political unrest: a mysterious group of masked young men called the Black Bloc who present themselves as the defenders of protesters opposed to the Islamist president's rule. They boast that they're willing to use force to fight back against Islamists who have attacked protesters in the past - or against police who crack down on demonstrations. The youths with faces hidden under black wrestlers' masks have appeared among stone-throwing protesters in clashes with police around Egypt the past five days in the wave of political violence that has shaken the country.
NEWS
December 6, 2012 | By Abigail Hauslohner, Washington Post
CAIRO - Tens of thousands of protesters massed outside the presidential palace and in Tahrir Square in Cairo on Tuesday, as Egyptians voiced their opposition to President Mohammed Morsi for a 12th straight day. The deepening political crisis has pitted Morsi, the country's first democratically elected president, and his Islamist backers against a broad alliance of young liberals, judges, human-rights groups, and loyalists of the former government....
NEWS
November 12, 2012 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
CAIRO - The crowd of Salafis in Tahrir Square, several thousand strong, was angry that a draft of a new Egyptian constitution wasn't based entirely on sharia law. The bearded men, many dressed in long, traditional galabiyas - with wives garbed in black, from their gloves to the veils that revealed only their eyes - were a far cry from the young liberals who filled the square in January 2011. Many of the men were members of al-Gama'a al-Islamiyya, a group that killed hundreds of policemen and civilians, and dozens of tourists, in the 1990s.
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