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Talib Kweli

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NEWS
February 14, 2016
The politically minded Brooklyn rapper Kweli teams up with the Soul Rebels, one of the most musically adventurous of young New Orleans brass bands. A socially conscious party should ensue. Wednesday at the Theatre of Living Arts.
NEWS
November 1, 2004 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When you've been waiting for five years, what's another 2 1/2 hours? Saturday night at the Electric Factory, the packed house had much to look forward to: the return to rhyming of Mos Def, the rapper/actor whose The New Danger is his first album in five years; plus his only scheduled U.S. tour date with Talib Kweli, his partner on the landmark 1998 conscious rap collaboration, Black Star. So the assembled hip-hop heads were relatively easygoing when the opener, J-Live, was a no-show, and the hours passed without any entertainment other than records by LL Cool J, Rob Base, and the Roots.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2005 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
Jay-Z called him your favorite rapper's favorite rapper. Mos Def, with whom he's touring, made him the yin to Def's yang as Black Star. Critics hailed him as a lion of Afro-conscious lyricism and a funky practitioner of flow. So why isn't Talib Kweli - whether considering the underground roots-rap of Quality or the hook-laden The Beautiful Struggle - bigger than 50 Cent? "When I started in the business, there no was separation between underground and commercial," Kweli said, commenting on the two sides of his own coin.
NEWS
October 23, 2008 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
It was an odd pairing, to say the least. When Talib Kweli and David Banner hit the Trocadero on Tuesday night in Sony's HipHopLive show, the first thing that sprang to mind was, "Huh?" Booking performers with opposing brands of artistry or ideals isn't a radical notion. But pairing rap's supremely conscious and earnest Kweli with Banner, its most party-hearty stylist, seemed akin to inviting Jennifer Aniston to an Angelina Jolie baby shower. So wrong. Jay-Z rhymed on his Black Album's "Moment of Clarity": "If skills sold, truth be told / I'd probably be, lyrically, Talib Kweli.
NEWS
July 17, 2007 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
When it comes to Mos Def, you find yourself almost blinded by his promise. He's a guy who does so many things well. As a rapper, Def put himself on the sociopolitical conscious tip as Black Star (with Talib Kweli). Then came the incendiary blast of 1999's solo Black on Both Sides. By giving his characters consequence, world-political outlook, danger and sexuality, he made each tale on the record richly theatrical. But Mos waited an eternity to follow up with 2004's The New Danger.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1999 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's been another bodacious year for hip-hop, from the successes of bleach-blond rhymers Eminem and Eve to New Orleans' Cash Money crew rappers Juvenile, B.G. and Lil' Wayne to the kiddie ditties of Will Smith. But apart from hip-hop's continued mainstream dominance, there's been another story bubbling up from the underground. Neatly bookended by last winter's breakthrough of Philadelphia's The Roots on Things Fall Apart and the new Black on Both Sides (Rawkus) by Brooklyn renaissance rapper Mos Def, it's a tale of young soul-hip-hoppers inspired by Malcolm X, Billie Holiday and Gil-Scott Heron as much as Run-D.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2003 | By Nathaniel Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
The reactionary, '94 Congress-like rise of 50 Cent notwithstanding, major label hip-hop has become a very strange place. The production of Timbaland and the Neptunes, which owes as much to glitchy electronica and glistening, theoretical minimalism as breaks and hooks, casts a long shadow over the singles market. Perhaps because of this, futuristic boho opuses such as the Roots' Phrenology and Cee-Lo's Cee-Lo Green and his Perfect Imperfections reinvent hip-hop from the inside out while facing relatively little resistance.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2010 | staff
POP...plus POP . . . plus The first enticement here is seeing the enigmatic soundscapist Daniel Lanois out and about, leading Black Dub , his new group venture, on guitar - not just holing up in the studio as producer/playmate for the likes of U2, Bob Dylan and Neil Young. No surprise, Lanois' new project embraces an atmospheric, open-ended approach, a hybrid of soul, New Orleans voodoo blues and its first cousin, Jamaican dub, with the added promise of no-two-performances-alike spontaneity.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2009 | By Sam Adams FOR THE INQUIRER
The rapper-turned-actor Mos Def has done his most engaging work in front of a camera and not a microphone in recent years. From his canny impersonation of Chuck Berry in the Chess Records biopic Cadillac Records to a guest shot on last season's House and a string of bit parts on Chappelle's Show, he has proved himself a versatile and inspired performer, but his rhyming skills ossified as his acting career blossomed. That changed this spring with the release of his fourth solo album, The Ecstatic.
NEWS
December 28, 2005 | Rob Watson INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
January's GQ magazine has an interview with King Kong star Jack Black in which he talks about a little binge he enjoyed while making Peter Jackson's epic homage to the 1933 film. "Overall, I'm very responsible on set. I'm not one of those dudes who come drunk to the set," the 36-year-old Black said. "But there was a lost weekend where I had a little time off and I did some ecstasy and I went on a kind of crazy rampage and I started smoking [again]," he says. "Me and another member of the cast, who will remain nameless, just running around, dancing around, drinking and ecstasizing, smoking like a chimney.
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NEWS
February 14, 2016
The politically minded Brooklyn rapper Kweli teams up with the Soul Rebels, one of the most musically adventurous of young New Orleans brass bands. A socially conscious party should ensue. Wednesday at the Theatre of Living Arts.
NEWS
August 8, 2012 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
When Chuck D, front man of the seminal hip-hop group Public Enemy, proclaimed that rap music "is CNN for black people," he spoke a truism of the time. By the late '80's, the Reagan years had stripped poor communities bare, crack cocaine had seeped in, police brutality ran rampant, and socially conscious groups like PE spit out the 'hood's hard-core truths with all of the delicacy of a sledgehammer. But try to find a CNN MC today. For every Mos Def or Talib Kweli, there's a surplus of Lil Wayne and Nicki Minaj wannabes - all puffed-up and profane style rather than socially charged substance.
NEWS
December 28, 2011 | By Marc Lamont Hill, Daily News Columnist
THIS IS IT. My last column of 2011. As I reflect over the past 12 months, I can't help but think about some of the valuable lessons I've learned about our city and the broader world. Here are a few: Andy Reid has compromising photos of Eagles owner Jeffrey Lurie: That's the only thing that could explain the organization's dogged commitment to a coach who repeatedly manages to snatch defeat from the jaws of victory. For 13 years, Reid's resistance to change and poor clock management, and refusal to run the football, have been the primary reasons why the Eagles have been unable to bring home a Lombardi Trophy.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2011 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a fairy tale that has ignited our heart, Anne Hathaway has become engaged to her beau of three years, actor Adam Shulman ( Dukes of Hazzard: The Beginning ). Adam, 30, proposed over the weekend armed with a Kwiat Heritage ring, says Us Weekly. The duo began dating a few months after Anne's thang with Raffaello Follieri folded when he was busted for defrauding investors of millions by posing as a Vatican real estate consultant. (He's currently serving a 4½-year stint in federal prison.)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2011 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
So is Celebritydom supporting Occupy Wall Street? Quite a few famed types have shown up in N.Y.C. since it all began in late September. And not just Noam Chomsky and Cornel West . Some celebs tweeted support, including Yoko Ono and Alec Baldwin , who, when asked what he'd do as president, roared: "Stiffer penalties for white-collar crime!" Early supporter Lupe Fiasco donated tents, and Russell Simmons brought 500 water bottles. Talib Kweli freestyled.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2010 | staff
POP...plus POP . . . plus The first enticement here is seeing the enigmatic soundscapist Daniel Lanois out and about, leading Black Dub , his new group venture, on guitar - not just holing up in the studio as producer/playmate for the likes of U2, Bob Dylan and Neil Young. No surprise, Lanois' new project embraces an atmospheric, open-ended approach, a hybrid of soul, New Orleans voodoo blues and its first cousin, Jamaican dub, with the added promise of no-two-performances-alike spontaneity.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2009 | By Sam Adams FOR THE INQUIRER
The rapper-turned-actor Mos Def has done his most engaging work in front of a camera and not a microphone in recent years. From his canny impersonation of Chuck Berry in the Chess Records biopic Cadillac Records to a guest shot on last season's House and a string of bit parts on Chappelle's Show, he has proved himself a versatile and inspired performer, but his rhyming skills ossified as his acting career blossomed. That changed this spring with the release of his fourth solo album, The Ecstatic.
NEWS
October 23, 2008 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
It was an odd pairing, to say the least. When Talib Kweli and David Banner hit the Trocadero on Tuesday night in Sony's HipHopLive show, the first thing that sprang to mind was, "Huh?" Booking performers with opposing brands of artistry or ideals isn't a radical notion. But pairing rap's supremely conscious and earnest Kweli with Banner, its most party-hearty stylist, seemed akin to inviting Jennifer Aniston to an Angelina Jolie baby shower. So wrong. Jay-Z rhymed on his Black Album's "Moment of Clarity": "If skills sold, truth be told / I'd probably be, lyrically, Talib Kweli.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2008 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The Philadelphia band the Roots has always made socially aware, stylistically varied music that's kept it on the leading edge of left-of-center hip-hop. But the collective led by drummer Ahmir "?uestlove" Thompson and rapper Tariq "Black Thought" Trotter has never been as politically pointed - or as provocative - as on its new album, Rising Down. "The perception of us being political has been by default," says Thompson, kicking back in camouflage pants and a hoodie decorated with boom boxes at the Zellerbach Theatre in West Philadelphia, shortly before the band was to perform on The Colbert Report this month.
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