CollectionsTaliban
IN THE NEWS

Taliban

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 9, 2001
Once military victory is complete in Afghanistan, should the United States expand the war on terrorism against other nations? If yes, who's next and why? If no, why not? Send essays of about 200 words by Dec. 17, including a phone number for verification, to Voices/Taliban, The Inquirer, Box 41705, Philadelphia, Pa. 19101. Send faxes to 215-854-4483 and e-mail to inquirer.letters@phillynews.com. Questions? Call Kevin Ferris, readers' editor, at 215-854-4543.
NEWS
September 21, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
KABUL, Afghanistan - A suicide attacker with a bomb in his turban posed as a Taliban peace envoy and assassinated a former Afghan president who for the past year headed a government council seeking a political settlement with the insurgents. Yesterday's attack, carried out in former President Burhanuddin Rabbani's Kabul home, dealt a harsh blow to attempts at ending a decade of war. The killing of Rabbani, an ethnic Tajik and one of the wise old men of Afghan politics, will blunt efforts to keep in check the regional and ethnic rivalries that help feed the insurgency.
NEWS
November 17, 2001 | By WILLIAM SALETAN
MAZAR-I-SHARIF. Herat. Kabul. Jalalabad. Kandahar. Faster than you can say "quagmire," the Taliban is fleeing cities across Afghanistan. A week ago, critics of the U.S.-led military campaign were insisting that the Taliban wouldn't budge, that American bombs were only killing civilians, that Ramadan and winter would lock in place the Taliban's advantage on the ground, and that the coalition supporting the war was disintegrating. Now the Taliban is disintegrating. Why? Because the crisis of confidence Osama bin Laden sought to foment in the West has taken hold in Afghanistan instead.
NEWS
December 16, 2011 | By Amir Shah, ASSOCIATED PRESS
KABUL, Afghanistan - Afghan President Hamid Karzai said Thursday that if security concerns make it impossible to set up a Taliban political office in Afghanistan, then it should be established in another Islamic country, like Saudi Arabia, or in Turkey. If the Taliban opened an office, it would be seen as a willingness to talk peace and signal their intention to try to find a nonviolent solution to an insurgency that has cost the lives of thousands. Karzai's comments came one day after an Indian newspaper reported that plans were being finalized for a Taliban office in the Gulf state of Qatar.
NEWS
September 16, 2010
KABUL, Afghanistan - Police fired warning shots to disperse hundreds of stone-hurling Afghans yesterday to protest Quran burning in the U.S. At least 35 police officers and 10 protesters were reportedly wounded; two of them had gunshot wounds. Though a small American church in Florida backed off its threat to destroy the holy book to mark the anniversary of the 9/11 terror attacks, several copycat burnings were posted on the Internet. Up to 800 protesters gathered on the outskirts of the capital, Kabul, chanting "Death to America" and listening to fiery speeches.
NEWS
October 19, 2012 | By Robert Burns, Associated Press
AB BAND, Afghanistan - Fed up with the Taliban closing their schools and committing other acts of oppression, men in a village about 100 miles south of Kabul took up arms late last spring and chased out the insurgents with no help from the Afghan government or U.S. military. Small-scale revolts in recent months like the one in Kunsaf, mostly along a stretch of desert south of the Afghan capital, indicate bits of a grassroots, do-it-yourself anti-insurgency that the United States hopes Afghan authorities can transform into a wider movement.
NEWS
September 12, 2011 | LOS ANGELES TIMES
KABUL, Afghanistan - The massive Taliban truck bomb that exploded outside an American military base in a restive eastern district injured nearly 80 U.S. troops and killed five Afghans, Western and Afghan officials said yesterday. The Taliban claimed responsibility for the attack, which took place Saturday evening in the Sayedabad district of Wardak province. That is the same district where insurgents last month shot down a U.S. Chinook helicopter, killing 30 American troops, the majority of them Navy SEALs, including some from the unit responsible for killing Osama bin Laden.
NEWS
December 10, 2012 | By Rebecca Santana, Associated Press
KARACHI, Pakistan - Bodies are piling up in Pakistan's largest city as it suffers one of its most violent years in history, and concern is growing that the chaos is giving greater cover for the Taliban to operate and undermining the country's economic epicenter. Karachi, a sprawling port city on the Arabian Sea, has long been beset by religious, sectarian, and ethnic strife. Here armed wings of political parties battle for control of the city, Sunnis and Shiites die in tit-for-tat sectarian killings, and Taliban gunmen attack banks and kill police officers.
NEWS
May 2, 2011 | Associated Press
KABUL, Afghanistan - On the first day of its promised spring offensive, the Taliban used a 12-year-old boy as a suicide bomber in an attack yesterday that killed four civilians, President Hamid Karzai said. It was one of several attacks across the country that killed seven people, government officials said. The insurgent movement announced in a statement Saturday that it would step up operations against military bases, convoys and Afghan officials, including members of the peace council working to reconcile with top insurgent leaders.
NEWS
October 8, 2001 | Staff Writer Dan D. Wiggs from Daily News wire services
TALIBANTER: She doesn't look at the world through veils. She isn't forced to stay inside her Bergen County, N.J., home. And she can say anything she wants. Maybe Laili Helms looks through rose-colored glasses. For sure, she is talking out of the other side of her mouth these days. Helms, an Afghan native who speaks three languages, coaches her sons' soccer team and is a niece-in-law of former CIA director Richard Helms, has long been a vocal supporter and adviser of the Taliban.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 30, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Afghan President Ashraf Ghani's trip to Washington last week was so triumphant one could almost imagine how his troubled country might morph into a future success story. At a joint session of Congress and a glittering White House dinner, the brilliant World Bank technocrat and Columbia University grad turned politician pledged a new era in Afghan-U.S. relations. The slight but elegant Ghani presented himself as the antidote to prickly former President Hamid Karzai, under whom corruption soared and U.S.-Afghan relations soured.
NEWS
October 24, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
In 2009, I spent an afternoon talking with Malala Yousafzai's father, Ziauddin, in an outdoor garden in Mingora, the capital of the Swat district of Pakistan, which had just been freed from months of Taliban control. I thought of that conversation when Malala, now 17, received the prestigious Liberty Medal in Philadelphia this week, and when she was named cowinner of the Nobel Peace Prize earlier this month. When I met her father, the name of his precocious 12-year-old was still unknown to the world - and he was still keeping it a secret - although she had been blogging under a pseudonym for the BBC for the previous year about life under the Taliban.
NEWS
June 17, 2014
LETTER WRITER Jay Meyers believes the Obama administration's release of five terror leaders from Gitmo Bay is standard operating procedure, and Republican outrage is unwarranted. Jay, like all liberal leftists, is wrong, as usual. War prisoners are only released when a war is over . . . and this war is far from over thanks to President Obama's appeasement strategy in dealing with terror-supporting nations. A war can only end when the enemy surrenders unconditionally, on its knees, or is destroyed.
NEWS
June 5, 2014
THE RELEASE of Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, a captive of Islamist extremists for almost five years, is good news not only for his family but for all Americans. But the price the Obama administration paid for the 28-year-old soldier's repatriation was freedom for five detainees at Guantanamo Bay who are hardened Taliban commanders. Critics of the administration say that that price was too high, and they make three other arguments: that the exchange violated a long-standing U.S. policy of refusing to negotiate with terrorists; that this country shouldn't negotiate with the Taliban because it might legitimize the group in Afghanistan; and that the swift release of the detainees violated U.S. law. Most of these arguments are invalid or overstated.
NEWS
April 14, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
What do Laura Bush and Hillary Clinton agree on? They, like many other prominent Americans, talk effusively about helping Afghan women. The fate of Afghan women is also a subject that grabs the attention of Americans who have otherwise lost interest in that country. When Afghans voted last week, much of the U.S. media coverage focused on lines of burka-clad female voters at the polls. So let's assume (and it's far from certain) that this interest in Afghan women is genuine and will outlast the U.S. troop exit at the end of 2014.
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
When Afghans went to the polls last week to elect a new president, Afghan social media enthusiasts sent out some incredible photos of women voters. The long, snaking lines of women in burkas, holding up sheets of plastic for protection from freezing rain, were a stunning repudiation of Taliban misogyny and violence. My favorite photo, tweeted by an Afghan journalist named Shafi Sharifi, showed an elderly, black-draped lady in a wheelchair, holding up a forefinger stained with indelible ink, saying: "I voted because women can't expect things to improve if they don't vote.
NEWS
January 28, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
WEST BERLIN, N.J. - Qari Nazar Gul was an elusive target. The top-level Taliban commander rarely left Pakistan for operations in Afghanistan. He dispatched couriers and ordered attacks from afar. Gul knew there was an eye in the sky and did not want to take a chance. In 2010, the eye belonged to Capt. Steve Iaquinto Jr., a targeting officer in charge of four aerial drones that searched for Taliban fighters in four provinces north of Kabul. The New Jersey Army National Guard officer collected intelligence on enemy activities, then planned combat ground operations that resulted in a half-dozen kills and more than 30 arrests, including that of Gul's nephew.
NEWS
January 10, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
IN "FORREST GUMP," the title character stands to give a speech on the Washington Mall, and his mic is cut. His speech goes on, but no one hears it - Robert Zemeckis' metaphor for the stifled voices of the men fighting the war at the time. It's a thread picked up again by Peter Berg in "Lone Survivor," a brutal account of a doomed Navy SEAL mission in Afghanistan, based on the memoir of Marcus Luttrell (Mark Wahlberg), obviously the man in the title. After a brief intro and quick sketches of the men as individuals, Marcus' squad is air-dropped atop a remote mountain, where they spy upon a "high-value" Taliban leader, looking down his village redoubt with telephoto lenses, blending into the tree line.
NEWS
November 27, 2013
Senate rule abused The filibuster was properly tolerated because it was used rarely up until the presidency of Barack Obama, when the Republican Party, having decided that it had nothing to offer but obstruction, resorted to heels-dug-in, scorched-earth, fanatical opposition to anything and everything that Obama wanted passed ("Senate just got worse," Nov. 25). Richmond L Gardner, Horsham, rlg3526@ix.netcom.com Reid once was a fan In an act of breathtaking cynicism and hypocrisy, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid has ignored what he once called "the vision of the founding fathers" in granting "the right to extend the debate" by moving to ensure that one party, the Democrats, have total control of the Senate ("Party's new breed drove 'nuclear option," Nov. 24)
NEWS
October 25, 2013 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
When Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif came to Washington this week, I couldn't help thinking of the adage: "Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me. " Sure enough, despite a long history of U.S. presidents being duped by Pakistani leaders, President Obama plans to restore more than $1.5 billion in blocked assistance for Islamabad. The aid was blocked because Pakistan never came clean about who helped Osama bin Laden hide for years in Abbottabad. And U.S.-Pakistani relations are stressed because Pakistan hosts Afghan Taliban who kill U.S. soldiers, as well as jihadis who kill Western and Indian civilians.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|