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Tammy Wynette

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1987 | By Jack Hurst, Special to The Inquirer
Tammy Wynette says she dreamed up her current LP, Higher Ground - on which she is backed by Ricky Skaggs, Gene Watson, the O'Kanes, Larry Gatlin and the Gatlin Brothers - as a concept album titled Out With the Boys. Although she never mentioned her idea to anyone but husband George Richey, it turns out that the Nashville boss of CBS Records, Rick Blackburn, had the same sort of thought, remembering the striking sound that Wynette and the O'Kanes had made together on a cut on a CBS Christmas album last year.
NEWS
September 22, 1988 | By Mike Capuzzo, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributing to this report were Inquirer staff writer John Corr, the Associated Press, United Press International and Reuters
Tammy Wynette's next song may be "B-A-N-K-R-U-P-T. " The country singer, who had a big hit with "D-I-V-O-R-C-E," and her husband-manager, George Richardson, filed for emergency Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection after losing a $900,000 judgment Tuesday to the Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corp. Ralph Gordon, an attorney for Wynette, said the problem had come about because Wynette and Richardson had some investments financed by the Sunrise Savings & Loan in Boynton Beach, Fla., which federal regulators shut down in 1985.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2001 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The first thing you should have for a theater piece about country star Tammy Wynette is a singer who can evoke the voice and performance style that helped make her famous. Chevy Anz is such a performer, and she stars in The Heroine of Heartbreak: Tammy Wynette Remembered at the Media Theatre for the Performing Arts. Anz has a big voice, and she gets Wynette's distinctive intonation (something between a wail and a plea), her stand-tall stage presence, and her intensity just right.
NEWS
April 9, 1998 | By Crispin Sartwell
One of the most intense voices of the 20th century has returned to silence. Tammy Wynette is dead. The first time I heard Tammy, my hair stood on end and shivers ran down my spine. She was the most emotional singer I'd ever heard and the purest country singer imaginable. Let me give you my list of the four greatest singers of popular music in this century. For whatever reason, they're all women: Billie Holiday, Janis Joplin, Aretha Franklin, Tammy Wynette. These voices made very different kinds of music in very different ways.
NEWS
April 3, 1992
IMAGINE HILLARY CLINTON AS FIRST LADY Millions of Americans were first exposed to Hillary Rodham Clinton as she sat loyally by her husband, Gov. Bill Clinton on 60 Minutes. He was there to deny any liaison with the currently specified bimbo. . . . His wife denied that she was like Tammy Wynette standing lachrymosely by her man; yet that is exactly what she seemed at that humiliating moment. It would be a shame for people to continue thinking of her only in that role, since she is one of the more important scholar-activists of the last two decades.
NEWS
December 8, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NASHVILLE, TENN. - Dobie Gray was more than a smooth balladeer who recorded the timeless hit "Drift Away" in 1973. He wrote songs for an array of country and pop performers, was a trailblazing entertainer in South Africa and a philanthropist. Gray died in his sleep at his Nashville home Tuesday, after a long battle with cancer. He was 69. Gray's silky tenor also was heard on other hits, including "The In Crowd," in 1965, and "Loving Arms," in 1973. He wrote songs recorded by Ray Charles, Johnny Mathis, Etta James, Three Dog Night, Julio Iglesias, John Denver, George Jones and Tammy Wynette.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1986 | By Jack Hurst, Special to The Inquirer
Rosanne Cash, who has never done a music tour of Great Britain, recently went there for an extensive media blitz. In addition to appearing before the 15 million viewers of Terry Wogan's TV show, on which she performed her Grammy-winning single "I Don't Know Why You Don't Want Me" and was interviewed by Wogan, Cash was interviewed for several BBC Radio programs as well as by the London Star, rock fan magazines Sounds and New Musical Express,...
NEWS
April 5, 1992
Lord knows, the Bill Clinton campaign has had its share of sour notes. There was that 60 Minutes misstep, when Hillary Clinton stomped on the toes of Tammy Wynette - without even meaning it (she said later). Then Bill himself plunged into the squabble over which Elvis ought to be on a U.S. stamp. Said he liked the younger, skinnier Elvis, alienating, we presume, those committed to the upholstered, Las Vegas version. No wonder that the campaign is giving itself an Excedrin headache over a theme song that'll go the distance.
NEWS
January 29, 1992 | by Ann Gerhart, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News wire services and the New York Daily News contributed to this report
QUOTE "There were a lot of women who felt strongly that Porkettes was a good name, a name Iowa people knew and recognized and felt a strong identification with. " - Helen Pollock, president of the now-defunct ladies' auxiliary of the Iowa Pork Producers Assn. THE STATE OF THE UNIONS WILL ALL OF THESE PEOPLE WIND UP INVOLVED IN THE BILL CLINTON-GENNIFER FLOWERS AFFAIR? We know you're been wondering just how much more ridiculous this Bill Clinton affair could get. You've been saying, "Gee, what could happen now?
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2012 | By David Hiltbrand, INQUIRER TV WRITER
Welcome to Malibu Country , the land that time forgot. Reba's sitcom, getting a late and lethargic jump on the new season, is supposedly set in the present, but it's enveloped in such a strong '70s and '80s haze, you'll swear you're watching it on Betamax. The premise is that Reba (the country singer formerly known as Reba McEntire) is a country singer named Reba McKenzie who put her career on hold to raise her two kids, Cash (Justin Prentice) and June (Juliette Angelo). Too bad the title Carter Country was already taken - by a '70s sitcom starring Victor French and the immortal Guich Koock.
NEWS
July 17, 2012 | By Joe Edwards, Associated Press
NASHVILLE, Tenn. - The singer Kitty Wells, 92, whose hits such as "Making Believe" and "It Wasn't God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels" made her the first female superstar of country music, died Monday. Her family said she died peacefully at home after complications from a stroke. Her solo recording career lasted from 1952 to the late 1970s. She made concert tours from the late 1930s until 2000. "It Wasn't God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels" in 1952 was the first No. 1 hit by a woman soloist on the country music charts and dashed the notion that women couldn't be headliners.
NEWS
December 9, 2011
Dobie Gray, 69, the smooth balladeer who recorded the timeless hit "Drift Away" in 1973, died in his sleep at his Nashville home Tuesday after a long battle with cancer. He wrote songs for an array of country and pop performers, was a trailblazing entertainer in South Africa, and, in death, a philanthropist. His silky tenor was heard on other hits, including "The In Crowd" in 1965 and "Loving Arms" in 1973. "He had such a unique style, so identifiable," said Bud Reneau, Mr. Gray's friend and songwriting partner.
NEWS
July 24, 2008 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Zooey Deschanel thought that she might explode. "I've been writing music since I was a little girl," says the 28-year-old indie-movie ingenue who makes up half of She & Him. The duo will play the Trocadero tomorrow in support of their fetching folk-rock debut, Volume One. "I started writing more prolifically when I was 19 or 20, and as soon as it became easy to record on your laptop, I was like, 'Oh my God, I can't wait to be able to do...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2001 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The first thing you should have for a theater piece about country star Tammy Wynette is a singer who can evoke the voice and performance style that helped make her famous. Chevy Anz is such a performer, and she stars in The Heroine of Heartbreak: Tammy Wynette Remembered at the Media Theatre for the Performing Arts. Anz has a big voice, and she gets Wynette's distinctive intonation (something between a wail and a plea), her stand-tall stage presence, and her intensity just right.
NEWS
September 13, 1999 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Ken Barry, 87, of Mount Laurel, a comedian who appeared with show business stars such as Sammy Davis, Jr., Sergio Franchi and Frank Sinatra Jr., died Saturday at Virtua-West Jersey Hospital Marlton. A veteran of more than 60 years in show business, Mr. Barry started his career as a singing waiter in the 1930s at the now-defunct Weber's Hof Brau in Pennsauken, then known as the Central Airport. With him was a young man named Red Skelton, who also was beginning his career. A longtime resident of South Jersey, Mr. Barry was born Sydney Golden, the son of a fruit huckster in the Kensington section of Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 16, 1999 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
KELLY WILLIS. Tin Angel, 20 S. 2nd St., 8 and 11 p.m. (First show is sold out.) Tickets: $15. Info: 215-928-0978. "Now time has left me feeling old and losing hope/Hell, I've walked a long way just to find the end of my rope. " Kelly Willis had a good night at the Grand Ol' Opry last Saturday. For a change, she didn't get bent over with stage fright. "I started to get nervous, but then I told myself to calm down and have fun," said this most talented, attractive and yes, insecure of alternative country singer/songwriters.
NEWS
April 15, 1999 | By Francesca Chapman Daily News wire services contributed to this report
QUOTE "In some ways, on some days, danger is my business. " - CBS News anchor DAN RATHER, dodging bullets in Yugoslavia Saying he's been forced to prove his innocence in the death of his wife Tammy Wynette, George Richey yesterday had the country legend's remains removed from her tomb and sent for an autopsy. Richey, Wynette's manager and fifth husband, said he requested the autopsy after three of Wynette's daughters from previous marriages filed a wrongful-death suit against him and Wynette's doctor last week, asking $50 million.
NEWS
April 6, 1999 | By Francesca Chapman Daily News wire services contributed to this report
Tammy Wynette's daughters, despite having failed in their efforts to dig up the body of their late mom, are suing the country star's doctor and her last husband, claiming the two men are responsible for Wynette's death. Fifty million dollars would help make things right, say lawyers for Tina Jones, Jackie Daly and Georgette Smith. The daughters claim doctor Wallis Marsh prescribed too much pain medication for Wynette, and, dealing with the star mostly over the phone, wrongly relied on Wynette's husband George Richey to adminster the drugs.
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