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NEWS
January 8, 2000 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In one of the most unusual heists of 1999, police are investigating the theft of nearly 1 million gallons of heating oil from a Southwest Philadelphia tank facility. The heating oil is valued at $600,000 wholesale, and is worth up to twice as much at retail prices, police said. TransMontaigne Co. discovered the theft in November, when the company noticed a discrepancy in the amount of heating oil being stored at its facility at 58th Street and the Schuylkill, said Jim Boyd, the company's senior vice president.
NEWS
April 8, 1993 | For The Inquirer / JAY GORODETZER
The exercise was part of an emergency response plan required by the federal Oil Spill Prevention Act of 1990, which applies to all facilities handling petroleum products that have potential for spills. The drill involved a simulated oil pipeline break. Fire chiefs from Aston and Upper Chichester Township and officials from BP Oil Pipeline Co., which owns the tank farm, and the BP Oil Refinery participated in the drill.
NEWS
February 10, 2000 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Last weekend's oil spill at the John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge occurred at a bend in the 50-year-old pipe where a weld cracked. The weld was part of a joint that was once common in pipeline construction but is no longer used. Officials of Sunoco, which owns the pipe, said yesterday that even though a better method is now used to join sections of pipe in new construction, there was "nothing inherently wrong" with the welded bend. They said the big mystery now was figuring out what caused the crack, which is three inches long.
BUSINESS
December 18, 1993 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It takes a special breed of businessman to get excited about a waterfront property surrounded by refineries and salvage yards. But to Robert J. Krawiecki, opportunity outweighs aesthetics in the 36-acre petroleum tank farm his company bought on Tuesday for $700,000 along the Schuylkill at 61st Street and Passyunk Avenue. "We're real excited about the prospects of what we'll do there," said Krawiecki, the president of C.R. Warner Inc., a Woodstown, N.J., oil recycler. The tract, formerly home to the bankrupt Pioneer Oil Co. Inc., had failed to attract a serious buyer earlier this year, when it was listed for $3.6 million, and so it was liquidated in an absolute auction: There was no minimum bid. "What can I say?"
NEWS
January 5, 1991 | By Michael Peck, Special to The Inquirer
Officials of Coastal Eagle Point Oil Co. called a news conference yesterday to warn parents that pranks by their children at the company's West Deptford refinery or Westville tank farm could cause a catastrophe. "We want local area parents to know that area children are risking their lives needlessly," said Joseph Graham, employee relations manager. Graham said that cigarette butts had been found inside a 9.2 million-gallon tank containing heating oil at Eagle Point's Westville tank farm and that fireworks apparently were set off atop one of the tanks July 4. Michael Sautter, another company official, said a spark from a cigarette could ignite fuel oil vapors.
NEWS
June 29, 2011 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sunoco Logistics Partners L.P., the unexciting but reliably profitable pipeline subsidiary of Sunoco Inc., is buying two fuel terminals for $156 million that will extend the reach of its supply network. Sunoco Logistics is buying the tank farm at Sunoco's Eagle Point property in Westville, Gloucester County, from the parent company for $100 million. It is also buying a refined products terminal in East Boston, Mass., from ConocoPhillips for $56 million. The Eagle Point tank farm, located next to a refinery that Sunoco shut down in 2009, has 5 million barrels of storage capacity.
BUSINESS
June 23, 1993 | ANDREA MIHALIK/ DAILY NEWS
Is this flower-strewn meadow somewhere on the Great Prairie? No. The tank farm in the background is a dead giveaway. The garden is at 26th Street and Penrose Avenue in South Philadelphia, where Blaine Bonham (left), of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, Greg Straub and Barbara Olejnik review plans for beautifying the lot. The Horticultural Society organized an extensive roadside cleanup and landscaping earlier this year. Through its "Philadelphia Green" project, federal, state and city money were gathered to demolish old buildings, remove trash and plant trees and perennials at the busy intersection, which has long been an eyesore for motorists leaving Philadelphia's airport.
NEWS
August 29, 2011
Sunoco Inc. shut a crude-oil refining unit at its Philadelphia refinery on Sunday after pumps in a tank farm that supplies the unit flooded because of Hurricane Irene, according to a person familiar with plant operations. The unit was operating at about half capacity, or about 40,0000 barrels a day, said the person, who declined to be identified because the information isn't public. Thomas Golembeski, a Sunoco spokesman, said in an e-mail that the Philadelphia and Marcus Hook refineries are operating at reduced rates after the storm.
NEWS
January 4, 1999 | By Angela Galloway, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Bundled in his pajamas and a robe, carpenter Ozzie Lawrence was enjoying his first quiet evening at home with his family in about five years. And then the explosions began. Late Saturday, a five-alarm fire at the Sartomer Co. chemical plant at 610 S. Bolmar St. sparked a series of explosions in a tank yard - forcing workers and about 100 neighbors to evacuate into the freezing rain and ice-covered streets and sidewalks. "It sounded like a bomb," said Ozzie Lawrence's wife, Dawn, 36, an administrative assistant who rarely sees her husband because of his work schedule.
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NEWS
September 19, 2013 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA - In accident in a storage tank in Southwest Philadelphia - a man had fallen 60 feet onto a platform on top of 100,000 gallons of gasoline and was semiconscious - prompted an emergency response from his fellow workers. For firefighters Alvin Jenkins and Eric Siegfried, it was another day at work requiring a high-angle rescue. After descending into the tank and making a rope harness in poor visibility, the veteran firefighters secured the injured worker, allowing him to be lifted out of the tank and taken to a hospital.
NEWS
August 29, 2011
Sunoco Inc. shut a crude-oil refining unit at its Philadelphia refinery on Sunday after pumps in a tank farm that supplies the unit flooded because of Hurricane Irene, according to a person familiar with plant operations. The unit was operating at about half capacity, or about 40,0000 barrels a day, said the person, who declined to be identified because the information isn't public. Thomas Golembeski, a Sunoco spokesman, said in an e-mail that the Philadelphia and Marcus Hook refineries are operating at reduced rates after the storm.
BUSINESS
June 30, 2011 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sunoco Logistics Partners L.P., the unexciting but reliably profitable pipeline subsidiary of Sunoco Inc., is buying two fuel terminals for $156 million that will extend the reach of its supply network. Sunoco Logistics is buying the tank farm at Sunoco's Eagle Point property in Westville, Gloucester County, from the parent company for $100 million. It is also buying a refined-products terminal in East Boston, Mass., from ConocoPhillips for $56 million. The Eagle Point tank farm, next to a refinery that Sunoco shut in 2009, has five million barrels of storage capacity.
NEWS
August 17, 2005 | By ELMER SMITH
BRIGHT ORANGE flames, visible as far away as Wilmington, lit up the sky around the Gulf refinery in South Philadelphia that night. On Sunday Aug. 17, 1975, an hour before dawn, a tanker was off-loading crude oil at a Gulf dock in the Schuylkill River when vapors ignited. Flames spread quickly into the tank farm, threatening to ignite some of the 600 massive steel drums, each with a capacity of up to 80,000 gallons of crude oil. But more than 500 firemen fought all night to avert a catastrophe.
NEWS
February 10, 2000 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Last weekend's oil spill at the John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge occurred at a bend in the 50-year-old pipe where a weld cracked. The weld was part of a joint that was once common in pipeline construction but is no longer used. Officials of Sunoco, which owns the pipe, said yesterday that even though a better method is now used to join sections of pipe in new construction, there was "nothing inherently wrong" with the welded bend. They said the big mystery now was figuring out what caused the crack, which is three inches long.
NEWS
January 8, 2000 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In one of the most unusual heists of 1999, police are investigating the theft of nearly 1 million gallons of heating oil from a Southwest Philadelphia tank facility. The heating oil is valued at $600,000 wholesale, and is worth up to twice as much at retail prices, police said. TransMontaigne Co. discovered the theft in November, when the company noticed a discrepancy in the amount of heating oil being stored at its facility at 58th Street and the Schuylkill, said Jim Boyd, the company's senior vice president.
NEWS
July 7, 1999 | By Mike Madden, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The township is close to reaching a deal with Texaco to buy waterfront property that planners hope to use as the heart of a new development along the Delaware River, officials said. For months, the township and the oil company have been working out an agreement for Pennsauken to take over a 20-acre former tank farm, which officials want to develop into a residential and commercial riverfront village. Negotiations are nearly finished, and a deal could be signed by next week, Township Administrator Ken Carruth said.
NEWS
January 4, 1999 | By Angela Galloway, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Bundled in his pajamas and a robe, carpenter Ozzie Lawrence was enjoying his first quiet evening at home with his family in about five years. And then the explosions began. Late Saturday, a five-alarm fire at the Sartomer Co. chemical plant at 610 S. Bolmar St. sparked a series of explosions in a tank yard - forcing workers and about 100 neighbors to evacuate into the freezing rain and ice-covered streets and sidewalks. "It sounded like a bomb," said Ozzie Lawrence's wife, Dawn, 36, an administrative assistant who rarely sees her husband because of his work schedule.
LIVING
October 17, 1998 | By Deirdre Shaw, Dan Hardy and Rachel Scheier, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF Inquirer staff writer Rich Henson and Mary Anne Janco of the Inquirer Suburban Staff contributed to this article
An explosion in an oil refinery shook the Delaware County town of Trainer yesterday afternoon, starting a fire that burned into the night and sending up a column of black smoke visible for miles. But thanks to warm, windless weather and the efforts of dozens of firefighters, the blast in a jet fuel tank at the Tosco refinery caused no apparent harm - other than one firefighter's twisted ankle. The cause was still under investigation last night. The blaze created a regional spectacle and prompted momentary terror in Trainer, a square-mile town along the Delaware River that is dominated by Tosco and Sun Oil Co. refineries.
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