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NEWS
July 9, 1987 | By Susan Bennett and Mark Thompson, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Denouncing President Reagan's Persian Gulf policy, the House voted 222-184 yesterday for a 90-day delay in reflagging 11 Kuwaiti oil tankers under U.S. military protection. Although proponents of the legislation claimed victory, they acknowledged that it was largely symbolic since the restriction was unlikely to become law before mid-July, when the first reflagging is to take effect. "What we are doing today is sending signals," said Rep. Les Aspin (D., Wis.), chairman of the House Armed Services Committee.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1993 | By David Johnston, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Pentagon has awarded a $3 million research contract to advance manufacturing techniques for a radical double-hull oil tanker that could bring the shipbuilding business back to the United States and reopen the old PennShip yards in Chester. The proposed tankers would have a brand name, Marc Guardian, and about 1,500 people, many of them semi-skilled workers, would assemble them, said Richard Goldbach, president of Metro Machine Corp., of Norfolk, Va. The tankers would be assembled from modules that would be built using factory technology.
NEWS
April 1, 1989 | By David Willman, Inquirer Washington Bureau
On the eve of the opening of the Alaskan oil pipeline 12 years ago, President Jimmy Carter ordered a regulation that would have required protective, double bottoms on all new oil tankers. On tankers the size of the 987-foot Exxon Valdez, now grounded in the Prince William Sound off Alaska, double bottoms provide about six feet of space between the steel forming the outer hull and another layer of steel forming the huge tanks that hold the petroleum cargo. "Double bottoms will prevent accidental pollution when the penetration is of a limited depth," because the tanks holding the oil would not have been pierced, said Joe Angelo, assistant chief of the Coast Guard's merchant vessel inspection division.
BUSINESS
December 29, 1994 | By Henry J. Holcomb, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The number of oil tankers complying with a new post-Exxon Valdez oil spill law more than doubled during the last two weeks, averting a potentially catastrophic nationwide winter oil shortage, oil-industry sources said yesterday. "We're not home free, but we're breathing a lot easier," Sun Co. spokesman Tom Baldwin said. More than a dozen ships steaming toward Sun's Philadelphia-area refineries now have the required insurance certificates, whereas only two did in mid- December, Baldwin said.
BUSINESS
October 29, 2005 | By Henry J. Holcomb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the modern version of the traditional keel-laying ceremony, final assembly began yesterday on the first of 10 product tanker ships to be built here over the next five years. The tankers are being built at the Aker Philadelphia Shipyard, formerly called the Kvaerner Philadelphia Shipyard, for charter by Overseas Shipholding Group Inc., of New York. Eric Smith, assistant vice president for Overseas Shipholding's fleet of 103 oceangoing ships, said his company would have a charter agreement in place by the time the ship is finished late next year.
BUSINESS
November 19, 2011 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. Congress approved delayed legislation on Friday that will allow Sunoco Inc. to transport ethane, a form of liquefied natural gas (LNG), from the Philadelphia area to the Gulf Coast. By unanimous consent, the House on Friday approved a bill that permits three LNG tankers to participate in "coastwise" trade - carrying cargo between U.S. ports. The Senate approved the legislation on Thursday. The Mariner Project, a joint venture between Sunoco Logistics Partners L.P. and MarkWest Energy Partners L.P., would transport ethane produced from the Marcellus Shale by pipeline to Marcus Hook and then by sea to the Gulf Coast, where ethane is used to make plastics.
NEWS
August 24, 1987 | By Marc Duvoisin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The latest convoy of reflagged Kuwaiti tankers and U.S. warships steamed through the Persian Gulf last night, varying its movements and maintaining radio silence to confound potential attackers. Shipping sources said that three oil tankers, a liquefied-gas carrier and their combat escorts were sailing uneventfully through calm seas toward the Strait of Hormuz, at the mouth of the gulf, where Iran has prepared launching sites for Chinese-made Silkworm antiship missiles. Pentagon officials provided no information on the convoy's movements.
NEWS
May 24, 1987
Flying the American flag from 11 Kuwaiti oil tankers plying the Persian Gulf sounds, on the face of it, like a sure-fire recipe for trouble. The Iranians have a habit of attacking Kuwaiti vessels because of Kuwait's quiet support for Iraq in the gulf war. Considering that the tankers are carrying oil that is bound primarily for Western Europe and Japan, many Americans might feel tempted to ask why the United States is risking military confrontation so...
NEWS
July 1, 1987 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
So the fat is all but in the fire in the Persian Gulf. The Reagan administration will have 11 Kuwaiti tankers plowing through those troubled waters under the problematic cover of American flags by the end of next week. The reflagging ploy, and the provision of U.S. Navy escorts, will be seen as a provocation by the Iranians, who correctly regard Kuwait as an ally of the Iraqis in the protracted Gulf War between Iraq and Iran. But there isn't a thing Congress can do to stop such lunacy.
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NEWS
June 18, 2015
ISSUE | ENERGY Solar, not tankers Philadelphia should be exceedingly proud that it has created a sustainable business center at the former Navy Yard. The $129 million U.S. Department of Energy Innovation Hub hosts numerous energy-efficient buildings and a 35-megawatt unregulated electric grid with leading smart-grid research. Let's hope that Philadelphia's future lies with safe, sustainable energy rather than explosive tanker cars and leaking pipelines that could endanger the city.
NEWS
February 26, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Route 90 ramp in Pennsauken where an oil tanker burst into flames Monday will remain closed for several days as crews clean up fuel that spilled onto the roadway and into nearby soil, Delaware River Port Authority officials said Tuesday. A light pole and the guardrail will also have to be replaced and the road repaved. The DRPA, which controls the ramp, will ask TK Transport, a Pennsauken-based company that employs the tanker's driver, to pay for the repairs. "I don't expect any resistance," the DRPA's chief executive, John Hanson, said.
NEWS
February 25, 2015 | By Barbara Boyer and Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writers
Emergency crews remain at the highway ramp where an oil tanker overturned and burst into flames in Pennsauken Monday morning, authorities said. The accident occurred on Route 130 northbound at the ramp to Route 90. Some news outlets reported that the driver of the tanker was accounted for, and there did not appear to be any other vehicles involved. The fire sent thick black smoke billowing into the sky that could be seen for miles around, including in Northeast Philadelphia. Authorities said a crash team would try to determine the cause of the accident and whether ice or snow was a contributing factor.
NEWS
February 25, 2015 | By Barbara Boyer and Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writers
Emergency crews were expected to continue working into Tuesday to clean up thousands of gallons of fuel that spilled in Pennsauken from a tanker truck that overturned and exploded into flames Monday morning, authorities said. They said the roadway would be closed as it is cleaned up and inspected for structural damage, and alerted motorists to expect detours. The incident occurred about 11 a.m. on the ramp to Route 130 from Route 90. The tanker spilled 7,800 gallons of fuel, said John Hanson, chief executive officer for the Delaware River Port Authority, which oversees the ramp.
NEWS
January 30, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Mike Austin knew it was bad when his cellphone buzzed after 12:30 a.m. Quickly, he scribbled notes and called a coworker: "Train derailment. Seven cars. It's on a bridge. I'm going to need help. " Then he hopped into his white Chevrolet Suburban and drove 21/2 hours from a sleepy Baltimore suburb toward Philadelphia, to which derailment experts from around the country were being summoned. Their task: Remove tens of thousands of gallons of crude oil and more than 1.8 million pounds of train cars from atop the Schuylkill Arsenal Bridge.
NEWS
January 22, 2014 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
IT COULD HAVE been worse - a lot worse. None of the seven CSX cars - six of them loaded with volatile crude oil - that derailed on the 128-year-old rail bridge over the Schuylkill between University City and Grays Ferry about 12:30 a.m. yesterday fell onto the busy expressway, which would have risked a fiery conflagration. And none of the oil-laden tanker cars - criticized by experts and environmentalists as too easy to rupture - broke open and spilled into the waterway as they tilted precariously, although the Coast Guard rushed a boat to the scene and placed booms across the river just in case.
NEWS
September 18, 2013 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
GREENWICH TWP. An empty tanker car of a train on its way to the Paulsboro refinery derailed just after noon Monday about a half-mile south of the scene of a derailment last year that caused a toxic chemical release. None of the other tanker cars went off the tracks Monday. At least one of the tankers carried liquefied petroleum gas, Greenwich Police Chief Joseph M. Giordano Jr. said. No leaks were detected, he said. Liquefied petroleum gas consists mostly of propane and butane, and is found in gas wells and oil wells.
BUSINESS
August 14, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Aker Philadelphia Shipyard has an agreement to build up to eight product tankers for Crowley Maritime Corp. of Jacksonville, Fla., that could keep the yard busy through 2017. Under terms of a joint business venture, Aker signed a $500 million contract with Crowley to build the first four 330,000-barrel tankers, to be completed in 2015 and 2016. The companies agreed to options for a possible four additional tankers. After several lean years, Aker's workforce is back to 1,000 at the Navy Yard.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The runaway crude-oil train that roasted downtown Lac-Megantic, Quebec, on Saturday has the refiners and shippers who count on similar trainloads to fill the Delaware River refineries paying close attention. Could this happen here? After all the blather about running out of oil, more crude is now flowing from deep wells and giant pits in central North America than ever. Pipeline operators want to ship the stuff East to refiners and consumers. Environmentalists and their alternative-energy allies in the Obama White House have blocked those plans, so far. So instead, oil has gone by rail - enriching people like Warren Buffett , whose Berkshire Hathaway holding company owns the Burlington Northern Santa Fe lines that dominate energy country, and Edward Burkhardt , who runs Chicago-based Rail World Inc. , which ran the killer train of Lac-Megantic.
NEWS
July 4, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Paul A. Tanker, 86, of Philadelphia, a philanthropist and actuarial company founder, died Monday, July 1, at Einstein Medical Center of complications from a stroke. He became ill Saturday while playing tennis at the Germantown Cricket Club. He lived in Cherry Hill and Wyndmoor before moving to the city several years ago. In 1960, with a $2,000 loan from friends, he created Paul A. Tanker & Associates, a pension and actuarial consulting firm in Center City. The company grew from two employees to 55 before he sold it in 1989 to Noble Lowndes, an international benefits company.
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