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Tapestry

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NEWS
April 6, 1988 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
A glimmer of gold flashed as the beam of Raymond A. Domanski's flashlight cut through the blackness of the 13th-story loft in the Public Ledger Building, Sixth and Chestnut Streets. The source of the gleam was what Domanski, administrative manager of the building, described as "a dirty piece of cloth" hanging over a steam pipe. The glittering gold was no illusion. Decorating the pipe was a large 19th- century Chinese-silk tapestry, rich in woven and applied gold and of an unusual design.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1990 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Staff Writer
There won't be too many old folks tuning in to the Disney Channel at 9 tonight to watch and hear Carole King. And most people under 30 probably will stay away, too. But misty eyes and thick throats will be everywhere among those of us in the middle, when King sits down at the piano and hits the characteristic opening chords of "Home Again. " "Sometimes I wonder if I'm ever gonna make it home again; it's so far and out of sight. " Going home is the classic concern of middle age, whether it's back home to the simpler, yet more exciting, times of youth, made even better in memory by the filter of years, or forward to the final home.
NEWS
April 4, 1987 | By David Iams, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dominated by an early-18th-century Belgian tapestry depicting a medieval theatrical group, the forthcoming gallery sale at Samuel T. Freeman & Co. is a collection of the unusual and the unexpected. The 9-by-11-foot tapestry is one of three that will go on the block April 15, the final session of the three-day auction. The work is signed I de Vos, Jan Van Orley and is expected to bring $12,500 to $17,500, more than 10 times the expected price of a half-dozen other tapestries in the sale.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2012 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
The title of Scottish playwright David Harrower's A Slow Air refers to a type of free-form bagpipe melody, but it also describes this drama's narrative. In Inis Nua Theatre Company's production, an adult brother and sister, Morna (Emma Gibson) and Athol (Brian McCann), alternate monologues, riffing individually on the circumstances that led to their 14-year estrangement. Ultimately, it's lovely music, a departure for the dark-ink playwright who penned the passion-driven works Knives in Hens and Blackbird . Its backdrop is the 2007 failed Glasgow Airport attack in which a pair of Muslim terrorists, one British-born, the other Indian, tried to drive an explosives-laden SUV into the airport.
NEWS
November 24, 2003 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The most interesting clue to Rufus Wainwright's musical roots came at the end of his first encore Friday at the Tower Theater, after he had done his sad-boy-at-piano act and delivered ballads about love and familial tension that were so delicate you didn't want to draw a deep breath, lest the melodies would topple. The members of his accomplished band left the stage, and Wainwright and his sister Martha duetted on a lusty version of "Moon Over Miami," sung in French, that was beautifully, disarmingly unaffected.
NEWS
April 15, 2011 | By Robert Strauss, For The Inquirer
  Bill and Winnifred Morrow, the fourth-generation sibling owners of Langhorne Carpet Co. in Penndel, Bucks County, were looking for a way to honor their forebears as the business - which calls the White House a client - approached its 80th anniversary. The answer involved a young talent, a Pearl Buck book, and two Habitat for Humanity branches, one here and one in Japan. "We have been in this area for a long time and wanted to find a way to give back - to affect the community in a positive way," said Bill Morrow.
NEWS
September 19, 1996 | By Julia Cass, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Inmates in the city's Curran-Fromhold Correctional Facility are taking a stronger interest in the Bible these days. Blame it on David and Bathsheba. The Rev. John Bonavitacola, the prison system's head chaplain, said he had received double the requests he usually receives for Bibles since a huge tapestry depicting stories from the Old Testament was hung in the chapel of the new prison in Northeast Philadelphia this month. A tapestry would not normally be much of an attention-grabber behind bars, especially not at Curran-Fromhold, where gross overcrowding forced the city to take emergency action last week.
NEWS
November 3, 1997 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Every day for six months, Rachel R. Cave labored over a single piece of cloth 18 inches square. Her stitches produced pinpoints of color that, ever so slowly, multiplied into the indomitable face of a black man. Cave struggled with the intricacies, using a dozen shades of yarn to create shadows so subtle that they could be discerned only in a beam of sunlight at the window where she worked. What worried her most, though, were the eyes. "They had to be real," said Cave, of Southwest Philadelphia.
NEWS
March 9, 1989 | By Jill Gerston, Inquirer Staff Writer
At a moment when designers are cribbing from one another or leafing through the history books for inspiration, original fashion is in short supply. The Fendis and Missonis, however, are sending the innovation barometer soaring with exciting, imaginative collections that are a tribute to their technical skill and fashion ingenuity. Tai and Rosita Missoni explored new paths in knitwear while the Fendis, in partnership with Karl Lagerfeld, raised fur design to an art form. Season after season, the Fendis have astounded the audience with bold, imaginative creations: furs the colors of the rainbow, furs patterned like twigs and fish scales, furs worked in pleats or quilting or cut out to resemble flowers and lace.
NEWS
February 19, 2001 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In Nancy Sivertsen's line of work, patience is paramount. A tapestry weaver and weaving teacher, Sivertsen put two years of effort into creating the 10-by-12-foot tapestry just installed in the Church of the Good Samaritan. Workers on scaffolding hung it Thursday on the sanctuary's west stone wall. In the work, a white silk dove takes wing across a boldly colored field woven from wool. Sivertsen said her design incorporates rising waves representing the church, accented by doves in flight toward a golden horizon, to represent the ways that the Gospel is carried into the world.
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TRAVEL
January 6, 2013 | By Shelley Cameron-McCarron, For The Inquirer
CONCHE, Newfoundland - I'm preparing to be drawn and quartered by my friends as we drive a long gravel road on the northeast tip of Newfoundland's rugged Great Northern Peninsula with no idea how far it is to the French Shore tapestries in Conche, an outport of 200 that had no road connection with the rest of the island until 1970. Just an hour and a half earlier we'd sat chummily, but road-weary, in St. Anthony - some 90 miles northwest - pondering the five-plus-hour drive we faced back to Corner Brook, when someone suggested nixing our planned side excursion.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2012 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
The title of Scottish playwright David Harrower's A Slow Air refers to a type of free-form bagpipe melody, but it also describes this drama's narrative. In Inis Nua Theatre Company's production, an adult brother and sister, Morna (Emma Gibson) and Athol (Brian McCann), alternate monologues, riffing individually on the circumstances that led to their 14-year estrangement. Ultimately, it's lovely music, a departure for the dark-ink playwright who penned the passion-driven works Knives in Hens and Blackbird . Its backdrop is the 2007 failed Glasgow Airport attack in which a pair of Muslim terrorists, one British-born, the other Indian, tried to drive an explosives-laden SUV into the airport.
FOOD
August 23, 2012
We love this "pad" of paper place mats that you tear off as needed. Just right for a brunch on the back porch or a simple dinner in the dining room, or even for lunch at your desk. Lots of charming designs to choose from, including roses, artichokes, tapestry, and tulips as well as kid-friendly versions with disguises and jewelry to color and punch out. Kitchen Papers place mats, pad of 50, $24.95 at Open House Living, 107 S. 13th St., 215-922-1415; Terrain, 914 Baltimore Pike, Glen Mills, 610-459-2400; or online at wwww.cakevintage.com . - Maureen Fitzgerald
FOOD
November 23, 2011 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
The progression of Rich Landau and Kate Jacoby continues. He started cooking vegan back in the '90s at Horizons Cafe, inside a health-food store in Willow Grove. She joined him. They married and moved everything downtown in early 2006 as the more refined Horizons. Now they're really aiming for the big leagues in Center City. At the romantic Vedge (1221 Locust St., 215-320-7500), which occupies several rooms in a cozy, historic-certified building in Washington Square West (the former Deux Cheminees)
FOOD
November 17, 2011 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
America's restaurant climate has been improving during the last few months, as national government job statistics suggest. Regionally, November may be the busiest month in years for openings, with nearly two dozen newcomers. What's the magic of opening in November? "It's because we couldn't open in October," said Stephen Starr, who on Friday debuts Route 6 , his seafood house at 600 N. Broad St.     , a sprawling, shore-style fish house in the former Wilkie auto showroom; see www.philly.com/route6 for the rundown, photos and menu.
NEWS
May 15, 2011 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
Their art may be visually dissimilar, but Cecilia Biagini and Matthew Cox, who are currently having their first solo shows at Pentimenti Gallery, share an interest in pattern, repetition, construction, and materials. And, like that of many of the artists who've exhibited here, their work is meticulously made. Biagini, from Buenos Aires and now in Brooklyn, shows paintings and wall-mounted sculptures that create a sense of rhythm with repeated lines and geometric forms. In her paintings, thin parallel lines of yellow, orange, and pale blue swoop synchronistically against darker backgrounds, looking as though they're floating in space.
NEWS
April 15, 2011 | By Robert Strauss, For The Inquirer
  Bill and Winnifred Morrow, the fourth-generation sibling owners of Langhorne Carpet Co. in Penndel, Bucks County, were looking for a way to honor their forebears as the business - which calls the White House a client - approached its 80th anniversary. The answer involved a young talent, a Pearl Buck book, and two Habitat for Humanity branches, one here and one in Japan. "We have been in this area for a long time and wanted to find a way to give back - to affect the community in a positive way," said Bill Morrow.
NEWS
May 13, 2007 | By Sally Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
"We did everything we could, but your mother died. " Those were the shocking words that Diana Kelly heard on July 8, 2005, at a local hospital emergency room. She had taken her mother, Georgia Brewley Wurster, to the ER when she was in extreme pain after a routine colonoscopy earlier that day. Kelly was all alone that night, and could not grasp that her 70-year-old mother had died so suddenly and unexplainably. The precise cause of death is still somewhat unclear. "My grief was so wide and so deep that I was in a total daze for months," said Kelly, 45, of Lumberton, a corporate concierge.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2005 | By Merilyn Jackson FOR THE INQUIRER
If Africa is the origin of human life, it is also the origin of language, art, music and dance. As Philadelphia's most renowned modern and Africanist dance writer and scholar, Brenda Dixon Gottschild, writes in her elegant DanceBoom! catalog essay, "African culture [and its] seeds pervade our daily lives from basketball to ballet and beyond Broadway. "Africanisms are not a choice," she writes, "but an imperative that comes to us the way electricity comes through wires. " With a dozen dance groups, this year's DanceBoom!
NEWS
November 24, 2003 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The most interesting clue to Rufus Wainwright's musical roots came at the end of his first encore Friday at the Tower Theater, after he had done his sad-boy-at-piano act and delivered ballads about love and familial tension that were so delicate you didn't want to draw a deep breath, lest the melodies would topple. The members of his accomplished band left the stage, and Wainwright and his sister Martha duetted on a lusty version of "Moon Over Miami," sung in French, that was beautifully, disarmingly unaffected.
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