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Tarragon

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 26, 2011 | By Lee Reich, Associated Press
Tarragon ( Artemisia dracunculus ) looks as pretty now as it's going to look any time of the year. Its flowers are nothing to speak of, but the strappy leaves, gray-green with a satiny sheen, hold up well in summer's heat and dryness. But who cares what tarragon looks like? We want it for its flavor, smooth and slightly licorice-y. Although few people grow tarragon, it's an easy herb to grow. The plant is as hardy in winter cold as it is in summer heat, and it's perennial.
FOOD
September 20, 2012
Makes 4 servings 12 small to medium leeks, cleaned, trimmed (about 21/2 pounds) 2 tablespoons white wine vinegar, or mixture of half sherry vinegar and half white wine vinegar 1 tablespoon Düsseldorf mustard 5 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1/2 teaspoon salt Freshly ground pepper 2 tablespoons chopped fresh chives 1 tablespoon chopped fresh tarragon or dill 1 package (8...
FOOD
April 5, 1989 | By Sonja Heinze, Special to the Daily News
Q. Why does my meringue topping sometimes go flat when I remove it from the oven? - Mary Tempesta Flagler Beach, Fla. A. There could be a number of reasons. First of all, you may be overbeating the egg whites. Before adding the sugar, beat them only until the foam is white and the tips of the peaks bend over in soft curls when the beaters are removed. To achieve the most volume, start off with egg whites that have come to room temperature. If possible, beat the egg whites in a copper bowl.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2010
4 tablespoons unsalted butter (1/2 stick) 1/4 cup all-purpose flour 4 cups milk (whole or low-fat, not fat-free) 12 ounces Gruyere, finely grated 1 pound ham (smoked, wet-cured), chopped 1 (9-ounce) package frozen artichoke hearts, thawed and squeezed to remove excess moisture 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon mango chutney 1 tablespoon minced tarragon leaves or 1 1/2 teaspoon dried tarragon 12 ounces dried ziti, cooked and drained according to package directions 1 ounce finely grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese Position rack in the center of the oven and preheat to 350 degrees.
FOOD
June 11, 2000 | By Marie Oser, FOR THE INQUIRER
Fresh blueberries are in season from late spring into the summer and are as American as apple pie. They are great to eat out of hand and work well in a number of healthful warm-weather dishes. Blueberries have the power to elevate an interesting medley blended with tofu and mushrooms by creating a fruity flavor for a fresh-tasting, ginger-spiked tomato sauce. Juicy, sweet, smooth-skinned berries were highly valued by American Indians. Ninety-five percent of the world's blueberries are exported from North America.
FOOD
February 7, 1990 | By Phyllis Farkas Liebert, Special to the Daily News
All but one of the 10 men who gathered in a basement kitchen in Haverford recently were there because their wives or girl friends had sent them. Smart ladies. Because at this cooking class for men at Charlotte Ann Albertson's Cooking School the guys learned to make a dinner for their Valentines. While most of the men knew their way around a kitchen, this evening gave them an opportunity to sharpen their skills and learn some new techniques, like how easy it is to scoop out an avocado half with the aid of a large, oval serving spoon.
NEWS
February 17, 1991 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
By whatever name, the "new" West Point Inn is a splendid place for quality dining. The Upper Gwynedd restaurant was known as MacPhee's until eight months ago, when new owners took over, making some cosmetic changes but keeping the same good chef and many of the old restaurant's most popular dishes. The result is an exceptionally friendly place in this small community just south of Lansdale, where good cuisine at moderate prices creates an unbeatable attraction. Dinner begins with a basket of warmed rolls and sesame bread sticks and a plate of crudities - carrots, celery, pitted black olives and fiery pepperoncini, accompanied by a sweetened blue cheese dip. A half-dozen grilled chicken livers ($3.50)
NEWS
February 15, 1987 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
A funky new Whitpain Township restaurant named Marmaduke's is a welcome exception to the general wariness diners should show toward restaurants that boast menus longer than their arms. Although Marmaduke's chef has to cope with a minimum of 24 main courses plus specials, eight salads and 17 appetizers, the food is quite good - not world-shattering, mind you, but interesting and decently prepared. Opened in July, Marmaduke's is the latest in a long line of restaurants at this Center Square location.
FOOD
February 6, 1991 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Few things capture the food essence of words like "rustic" and "hearty" as well as one-dish meals. These are the traditional dishes that best convey the basic pleasures of home cooking. Mara Reid Rogers, a food writer and stylist, has put together an excellent compilation of one-pot cookery in Contemporary One Dish Meals (Lake Isle Press, $21.95). She has included the familiar classics, as well as those traditional to various ethnic groups. "Whether they are adaptations of classic recipes from around the world or entirely new," she says, "they all deliver hearty, visually appealing meals made with fresh, high-quality ingredients.
FOOD
August 30, 1989 | By Sharon MacKenzie, Special to The Inquirer
The final days of summer, when the weather can be most unpredictable, aren't always the best ones, but they are certainly among the most cherished. The last roses, the last sandlot games and the last patio parties are some of the reasons we all value this time of year. But for tomato junkies, the last of the fresh crop is the number-one joy. We decided to feature this wonderful gift of nature in this month's Affordable Feast, and we wound up with a very special-occasion dinner that's worth the time and money to prepare - a little more of each than is usual for this feature, but the shopping is easy, the preparation is nicely manageable with do-aheads, and the price is still less than $19 to feed four.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
September 20, 2012
Makes 4 servings 12 small to medium leeks, cleaned, trimmed (about 21/2 pounds) 2 tablespoons white wine vinegar, or mixture of half sherry vinegar and half white wine vinegar 1 tablespoon Düsseldorf mustard 5 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1/2 teaspoon salt Freshly ground pepper 2 tablespoons chopped fresh chives 1 tablespoon chopped fresh tarragon or dill 1 package (8...
NEWS
August 26, 2011 | By Lee Reich, Associated Press
Tarragon ( Artemisia dracunculus ) looks as pretty now as it's going to look any time of the year. Its flowers are nothing to speak of, but the strappy leaves, gray-green with a satiny sheen, hold up well in summer's heat and dryness. But who cares what tarragon looks like? We want it for its flavor, smooth and slightly licorice-y. Although few people grow tarragon, it's an easy herb to grow. The plant is as hardy in winter cold as it is in summer heat, and it's perennial.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2010
4 tablespoons unsalted butter (1/2 stick) 1/4 cup all-purpose flour 4 cups milk (whole or low-fat, not fat-free) 12 ounces Gruyere, finely grated 1 pound ham (smoked, wet-cured), chopped 1 (9-ounce) package frozen artichoke hearts, thawed and squeezed to remove excess moisture 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon mango chutney 1 tablespoon minced tarragon leaves or 1 1/2 teaspoon dried tarragon 12 ounces dried ziti, cooked and drained according to package directions 1 ounce finely grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese Position rack in the center of the oven and preheat to 350 degrees.
FOOD
December 3, 2000 | By Aliza Green, FOR THE INQUIRER
It's easy to see why the early Celts referred to carrots as the "honey underground. " They are, indeed, honey-sweet, brightly colored and crunchy. Not to mention loaded with beta-carotene, from which we get Vitamin A. We eat carrots - equally delicious raw or cooked - all the time and tend to take them for granted. Carrots also are just about the most adaptable and forgiving vegetable around. They're generally quite inexpensive, even when organically grown, and available year round.
FOOD
June 11, 2000 | By Marie Oser, FOR THE INQUIRER
Fresh blueberries are in season from late spring into the summer and are as American as apple pie. They are great to eat out of hand and work well in a number of healthful warm-weather dishes. Blueberries have the power to elevate an interesting medley blended with tofu and mushrooms by creating a fruity flavor for a fresh-tasting, ginger-spiked tomato sauce. Juicy, sweet, smooth-skinned berries were highly valued by American Indians. Ninety-five percent of the world's blueberries are exported from North America.
NEWS
September 29, 1995 | By Michael Vitez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Lunch Bunch entered Au Bon Pain in uniform - skirts, the same brand of comfortable walking shoes, costume pearls, purses strapped across their chests. They walked to their spot, in the back corner, a table for four. Vera and Jean set the table. They unfolded napkins as place mats and set out plastic spoons, knives, forks and folded napkins for the lap, just as a grandmother would. Esther and Mary stood in line and ordered the usual: two tarragon chicken salad sandwiches on four-grain bread, plus four black coffees.
BUSINESS
June 1, 1992 | By Susan Q. Stranahan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Judy Street's business is what they had in mind when the term cottage industry was coined. Working from her 19th-century house on a pretty 17-acre farm in Chester County, Street began her little venture in 1975, maybe 1974 - she's not certain. Today, she divides her time among gardens, kitchen and a large chicken coop turned herb house, brewing and sampling her herb-flavored gourmet vinegars and vinaigrettes, marketed under the label of her home and place of business, Apple Pie Farm, in Malvern.
FOOD
September 1, 1991 | By Marilynn Marter, Inquirer Food Writer
The charming and, come evening, festively lit outdoor dining terrace at Rosebud's Cafe in Chestnut Hill was our first impression of this cafe. Fronting on Germantown Avenue in a cluster of attractive shops and eateries, the open-air cafe was enough to lure us past Rosebud's depressingly bare entry. But it took a family with restless tots at the next table and a plea for a quieter corner on our second visit before we found Rosebud's all-but-hidden indoor dining room. There, rose tones and teal link a comfortably haphazard blend of country French, garden and contemporary accents.
NEWS
February 17, 1991 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
By whatever name, the "new" West Point Inn is a splendid place for quality dining. The Upper Gwynedd restaurant was known as MacPhee's until eight months ago, when new owners took over, making some cosmetic changes but keeping the same good chef and many of the old restaurant's most popular dishes. The result is an exceptionally friendly place in this small community just south of Lansdale, where good cuisine at moderate prices creates an unbeatable attraction. Dinner begins with a basket of warmed rolls and sesame bread sticks and a plate of crudities - carrots, celery, pitted black olives and fiery pepperoncini, accompanied by a sweetened blue cheese dip. A half-dozen grilled chicken livers ($3.50)
FOOD
February 6, 1991 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Few things capture the food essence of words like "rustic" and "hearty" as well as one-dish meals. These are the traditional dishes that best convey the basic pleasures of home cooking. Mara Reid Rogers, a food writer and stylist, has put together an excellent compilation of one-pot cookery in Contemporary One Dish Meals (Lake Isle Press, $21.95). She has included the familiar classics, as well as those traditional to various ethnic groups. "Whether they are adaptations of classic recipes from around the world or entirely new," she says, "they all deliver hearty, visually appealing meals made with fresh, high-quality ingredients.
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