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Tasco

NEWS
January 15, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
After 27 years on Philadelphia City Council, Marian B. Tasco is calling it quits. The veteran politician will not seek reelection to her Ninth District seat, and instead said she would endorse a former aide, State Rep. Cherelle L. Parker (D., Phila.), to succeed her. Tasco, 77, said Tuesday that she had been thinking about retirement for a while, given her age and recent health issues. She said she was ready to take some time off and help a new generation of city leaders. "I've been working since I was 12 years old," she said.
NEWS
January 15, 2015 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN & MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writers brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
THE MAY 19 DEMOCRATIC primary election is shaping up with some new faces expected on the ballot and one veteran city politician wrapping up her tenure. City Councilwoman Marian Tasco, leader of the 50th Ward, told her committee people Monday night that she will not run for an eighth term in the 9th District. Tasco yesterday said she hopes state Rep. Cherelle Parker takes her place on Council. Parker, who started her career as a high-school intern in Tasco's City Hall office, said she has been in "nonstop" conversations since Monday's announcement.
BUSINESS
November 20, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marian B. Tasco, the veteran city councilwoman who has led opposition to Mayor Nutter's proposed sale of the Philadelphia Gas Works, is unfazed that there may be hell to pay if PGW's $1.86 billion privatization fails. "The people who influence me are the 150,000 who live in my district, who say we should keep our utility," Tasco, the Ninth District councilwoman, said Tuesday after a meeting of the Philadelphia Gas Commission, the city body she chairs. The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission signaled Friday that there might be serious repercussions if City Council did not give a fair hearing to the proposed $1.86 billion sale to UIL Holdings Corp.
NEWS
November 16, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth and Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writers
An exasperated Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission signaled there may be serious repercussions as a consequence of City Council's failure to consider a proposed $1.86 billion privatization of Philadelphia Gas Works. Two PUC members suggested the commission, the state body responsible for setting rates, could force the city to give up the $18 million annual fee it now receives from PGW and spend the money instead on speeding up gas-main replacement. PUC Commissioner James H. Cawley also suggested the legislature should consider removing City Council and its gas agency from any regulatory oversight of the municipal utility, eliminating a vexing jurisdictional overlap.
BUSINESS
November 14, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eight months after UIL Holdings Corp. signed an agreement to buy Philadelphia Gas Works for $1.86 billion, it finally got a hearing Thursday night before City Council. It lasted about 10 minutes. At the end of nearly six hours of testimony about future options for PGW since City Council has blocked consideration of a sale, Alex V. DeBoissiere, UIL senior vice president, was granted an opportunity to speak. It was the first time a UIL official has had a chance to speak at a Council hearing since Mayor Nutter chose the Connecticut company to buy PGW. Council members told DeBoissiere they believed that the sale agreement could not be amended _ that the Nutter administration had given them a take-it-or-leave-it deal.
NEWS
November 2, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission will hold a one-day session on Nov. 14 at Drexel University to explore plans for Philadelphia Gas Works in the aftermath of a collapsed deal to sell the city utility. The session will not be aimed at dissecting the collapse of the $1.86 billion agreement to sell PGW to UIL Holdings Corp., but will address how PGW plans to address its high rates, aging infrastructure and low-income programs in the absence of a sale, said Jennifer Kocher, the PUC's spokeswoman.
BUSINESS
July 10, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia City Council may have taken the summer off, but its tit-for-tat continues with the Nutter administration over the sale of the city's gas utility. Council is spending $20,000 to run radio ads explaining why it has not taken action on the proposed sale of Philadelphia Gas Works, which Nutter announced more than four months ago. Under the nearly $2 billion sale agreement proposed in March, Connecticut-based UIL Holdings Corp. has the option to back out of the deal after July 15 if City Council has not taken action.
NEWS
May 28, 2014
Suffer the children As the parent of a kindergartner in the Philadelphia schools, my message to elected leaders is straightforward: You cannot continue to do nothing about the situation ("Inexplicable behavior," May 25). At my son's school, McCall Elementary, a nurse was rehired after money was raised by parents, and politicking, and who knows what else. But she also serves as: late-desk check-in, lunch aide, recess aide, guidance counselor, and volunteer coordinator. In April, they took away the security guard, so the nurse has to do all that he did, too: fire drills, emergencies, visitor security.
BUSINESS
May 24, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
A critic of Mayor Nutter's proposed sale of Philadelphia Gas Works for $1.86 billion to UIL Holdings Corp. on Thursday urged City Council not to rush into a decision. Councilwoman Marian B. Tasco's call for restraint came after the Committee of Seventy on Monday pressured Council to schedule a public hearing on the issue and the Pennsylvania Intergovernmental Cooperation Authority on Tuesday endorsed the sale. Council is currently awaiting a consultant's report on the proposed sale.
NEWS
March 22, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas and Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writers
PHILADELPHIA City Council passed an ordinance Thursday that bars city officers and employees from receiving cash from anyone seeking business or official action, while allowing receipt of non-monetary gifts worth up to $99 per donor per year. The vote was unanimous. The bill amends the existing gifts ordinance with language that is easier to enforce, and some say stricter, than is on the books now. Mayor Nutter is expected to sign the bill into law. The city code now prohibits gifts of "substantial economic value," but leaves the term undefined.
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