FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 18, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, STAFF WRITER
Looking to raise millions for a bold expansion of early childhood education, Philadelphia City Council on Thursday approved a 1.5-cent-per-ounce tax on sugar-sweetened and diet beverages, the first such tax imposed in a major U.S. city. The 13-4 vote put to bed months of speculation and at-times-bitter negotiations, but also ensured that the national spotlight will stay turned on Philadelphia for months, if not years. Critics quickly vowed a court challenge. And as the city introduces the unprecedented levy - and its economic and public-health effects come into view - experts, advocates, and legislators will surely be watching closely . Mayor Kenney, who can count this as the first major political victory of his term, called it a start to "changing the narrative of poverty in our city.
NEWS
January 9, 2012
With a first-year record like Gov. Corbett's, it's a good thing he still has three more years to go. Or maybe not. Another three years could give Corbett time to make some progress, at least, toward pressing issues facing the state - like fixing roads and bridges, or making natural-gas drillers pay their fair share. There even may be time to do something about handgun violence that tragically ends hundreds of Pennsylvanians' lives annually (were the governor not such a gun-rights stalwart)
NEWS
March 11, 2012 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
  There's budget trouble in Medford, an affluent Norman Rockwell suburb with two newly renovated fire halls, respected schools, and a variety of lush parks. Despite the recent economic turmoil and the township's apparently insatiable demand for amenities, its tax rate stayed flat from 2006 to 2010 and went up only slightly last year. And that is precisely why the Burlington County community now faces a financial emergency, say leaders of the five-member, all-Republican Town Council and a chorus of budget experts.
NEWS
March 11, 2010
MAYOR NUTTER is constantly crying poor and trying to charge taxpayers more fees or provide fewer services. His new plan is to charge a weekly trash fee to help the city raise needed funds. Then, in the same day's paper is an article on Nutter appointing a former city official to a position heading the Office of Economic Opportunity. In plain English, this position is aimed at getting 25 percent of all city contracts to go to minority- or female-owned businesses. But the real kicker is that her salary will be $135,000.
NEWS
September 1, 1990
For a country that's short of cash and repelled by Wall Street greed, this proposal sounds like a winner: Tax the sale of stocks and bonds. At a penny for every $2 worth of securities, such a levy would bring in about $12 billion a year. And it would fall most heavily on the fast-buck artists who buy and sell securities for speculative gain, not long-term investment. Or so the pitch goes. Unfortunately, even though the tax sounds small, it probably would jolt financial markets.
NEWS
May 15, 2011 | By Dan Hardy and John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writers
Facing what some see as the most dire funding crisis in decades, school districts across the region are proposing cuts that could drastically reshape their programs and communities. In district after district, officials have proposed budgets notable for what's missing: busing, kindergarten, athletics, librarians, languages, gym classes. Thousands of area school employees are likely to lose jobs, even as taxes in their districts rise. "This is unlike anything we've seen in the last 50 years," said Lou DeVlieger, superintendent of Upper Darby School District, which plans to cut 47 jobs, draw $4 million from reserves, and raise taxes 2.7 percent.
NEWS
June 22, 2016 | By Claudia Vargas, Staff Writer
Before dozens of cheering supporters in City Hall, Mayor Kenney signed the sweetened beverages tax into law Monday. Now comes the tough part: enforcement. The 1.5-cent-per-ounce tax on sugar-sweetened and diet beverages is expected to raise about $91 million annually, which will go toward expanding prekindergarten in the city; creating community schools; improving parks, recreation centers, and libraries; and funding various other budget programs. Getting that money will be dependent on the Revenue Department's enforcing the tax on distributors, or, in some cases, the vendors.
NEWS
April 12, 2010
MANY have debated the mayor's proposed sugar-sweetened beverage tax, but it would be illegal. Pennsylvania law specifically bans the city from taxing an item that the state already taxes. As anyone who's picked up a six-pack of soda in a supermarket knows, Pennsylvania taxes ALL soft drinks at 6 percent, sugar sweetened or not. Like the state sales tax, the proposed sugar tax would fall on the consumer. If this tax were enacted, we'd pay separate taxes on the same item. In fact, the city designed this tax to fall on the consumer, claiming the goal is to change buying behavior.
NEWS
January 4, 1990 | By Brigette ReDavid, Special to The Inquirer
Narberth's 1990 operating budget of about $1.5 million will require no tax increase after all. According to borough manager William Martin, the 3.28-mill tax increase that had been proposed was offset by unanticipated revenue, including a grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to pick up 75 percent of the $80,000 estimated cost of renovating and building an addition to the borough library. Martin said the borough also received about $80,000 not originally figured into the proposed 1990 budget in reimbursement for compensation pay for a police officer out of work since 1984.
NEWS
December 5, 2013 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
THERE'S A NEW real-estate tax loophole for Philadelphians - and you don't need to be a millionaire to take advantage of it. To limit the huge increases some residents are seeing under the Actual Value Initiative tax-reform effort, the city is launching the Longtime Owner Occupants Program, or LOOP. "I do not create these acronyms, but I think this one is quite interesting," Mayor Nutter said while announcing the program yesterday with City Council members. The program will benefit lower-income homeowners who have been in their homes for at least 10 years and saw their property assessments increase by 300 percent or more this year.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 23, 2016
A story Tuesday on the signing of the Philadelphia beverage tax into law incorrectly identified the group that retained Kline & Specter P.C. to challenge the legality of the tax. It was the American Beverage Association. A story Friday on Philadelphia Health Department restaurant inspections incorrectly described the restaurants Sannee and Wong Wong. They offer table service as well as takeout.
NEWS
June 23, 2016
"Nearly 250 years ago, the eyes of the world were on Philadelphia and the birth of American democracy. On Thursday, Philadelphia will again make history by becoming the second U.S. city, and the largest, to pass a tax on soft drinks. " - City Council leaders Darrell L. Clarke, Bobby Henon, Blondell Reynolds Brown, and Bill Greenlee, The Inquirer, June 14 By Mark Randall (with obvious help from Thos. Jefferson) When in the Course of human events it becomes necessary for one people to dispense with the sugary brands that have consumed them, and that they have consumed, and then resume among the streets of the city that separate and unequal station to which the Laws of Economics and City Council have doomed them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the reasons they should be glad of this.
NEWS
June 23, 2016 | By Karen Langley and Angela Couloumbis, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - In a shift that could ease the path to a budget deal, Gov. Wolf said Tuesday that he would no longer seek a hike in the state's personal income or sales taxes to raise new revenue. Instead, the governor told a Pittsburgh radio station, he believes he can achieve his priorities without raising the taxes that hit Pennsylvanians the hardest. "I'm not asking for a sales tax increase or a personal income tax increase," Wolf said on KDKA-AM barely a week before the July 1 budget deadline.
NEWS
June 23, 2016
ISSUE | TAXES Alter abatement tax Cheers to architecture columnist Inga Saffron for casting a light on what has become a tax boondoggle - the 10-year real estate tax abatement. ("With soda tax done, let's retool abatement," June 17). Philadelphia has one of the most liberal, untargeted abatements in the nation. As Saffron points out, historic and vintage buildings that define neighborhoods are destroyed to obtain the abatement, and the public school system is deprived of tens of millions of dollars in critical funding.
NEWS
June 22, 2016
ISSUE | SODA TAX Unions divided Now that City Council has approved the beverage tax, winners and losers will be tallied ("Soda tax makes history," Friday). Teamsters Local 830 lost big. As sales plummet once the tax is enacted, we will feel a corresponding loss of jobs. The beverage companies lost as sales of sugar-sweetened and diet drinks will tank. Consumers lost since they'll absorb the tax. The business community lost because it's another antibusiness levy. But the hidden cost is the damage it has done to the labor community.
NEWS
June 22, 2016 | By Claudia Vargas, Staff Writer
Before dozens of cheering supporters in City Hall, Mayor Kenney signed the sweetened beverages tax into law Monday. Now comes the tough part: enforcement. The 1.5-cent-per-ounce tax on sugar-sweetened and diet beverages is expected to raise about $91 million annually, which will go toward expanding prekindergarten in the city; creating community schools; improving parks, recreation centers, and libraries; and funding various other budget programs. Getting that money will be dependent on the Revenue Department's enforcing the tax on distributors, or, in some cases, the vendors.
NEWS
June 21, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
For most of Gov. Christie's tenure, political theater in Trenton has followed a familiar pattern: Democrats, over Republicans' objections, raise taxes to fund New Jersey's pension plans for public employees. Christie vetoes the legislation, presenting himself as fiscally responsible. Now the equation has changed. Facing pressure to replenish the state's empty fund for roads, bridges, and rail projects before the fiscal year ends June 30, some Democrats are questioning the wisdom of a proposal to raise the gas tax but cut other sources of revenue, and a handful of Republicans are supporting the idea.
NEWS
June 21, 2016 | By Juliet Sims, Jessica Berthold, and Sarah Mittermaier
Philadelphia scored a major victory for public health last week by becoming the first large U.S. city to pass a tax on sugary drinks. Only the small city of Berkeley, Calif., has managed to do likewise; Philly's tax is heftier and will affect far more people. What's more, the fact that this measure passed in a city where it failed twice before, and in the face of strong opposition from the beverage industry, will inspire and embolden cities like San Francisco, Boulder, Colo., and Oakland, Calif., where voters will decide on sugary-drink taxes this fall.
NEWS
June 20, 2016
With so much attention on the sugary and non-sugary beverage tax that City Council finally passed Thursday following weeks of debate and a game-saving, last-minute reduction in the levy, little was said about Mayor Kenney's overall $4.2 billion budget being a whopping $192 million bigger than the current spending plan. The 1.5-cents-per-ounce beverage tax will generate about $91 million a year initially, until soda consumption predictably goes down. But that money is designated for specific expenditures, including a program to increase the number of "high-quality" prekindergarten slots in the city.
NEWS
June 20, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
The day after Philadelphia became the first big U.S. city to tax soda by the ounce, Mayor Kenney got powdered up for a CNN interview as the phones in his office kept ringing. Other cities wanted to know how he'd done it. National headlines said, "Philadelphia passes soda tax after mayor rewrites playbook. " Ed Rendell's brother, a lawyer, texted from Texas: "Congrats on the soda tax. " Former Gov. Rendell gushed Friday: "This is a big win for Jim Kenney. Being the first major city in the country to do this is significant, and he did it for the right reason.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|