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NEWS
June 18, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, STAFF WRITER
Looking to raise millions for a bold expansion of early childhood education, Philadelphia City Council on Thursday approved a 1.5-cent-per-ounce tax on sugar-sweetened and diet beverages, the first such tax imposed in a major U.S. city. The 13-4 vote put to bed months of speculation and at-times-bitter negotiations, but also ensured that the national spotlight will stay turned on Philadelphia for months, if not years. Critics quickly vowed a court challenge. And as the city introduces the unprecedented levy - and its economic and public-health effects come into view - experts, advocates, and legislators will surely be watching closely . Mayor Kenney, who can count this as the first major political victory of his term, called it a start to "changing the narrative of poverty in our city.
NEWS
January 9, 2012
With a first-year record like Gov. Corbett's, it's a good thing he still has three more years to go. Or maybe not. Another three years could give Corbett time to make some progress, at least, toward pressing issues facing the state - like fixing roads and bridges, or making natural-gas drillers pay their fair share. There even may be time to do something about handgun violence that tragically ends hundreds of Pennsylvanians' lives annually (were the governor not such a gun-rights stalwart)
NEWS
March 11, 2012 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
  There's budget trouble in Medford, an affluent Norman Rockwell suburb with two newly renovated fire halls, respected schools, and a variety of lush parks. Despite the recent economic turmoil and the township's apparently insatiable demand for amenities, its tax rate stayed flat from 2006 to 2010 and went up only slightly last year. And that is precisely why the Burlington County community now faces a financial emergency, say leaders of the five-member, all-Republican Town Council and a chorus of budget experts.
NEWS
March 11, 2010
MAYOR NUTTER is constantly crying poor and trying to charge taxpayers more fees or provide fewer services. His new plan is to charge a weekly trash fee to help the city raise needed funds. Then, in the same day's paper is an article on Nutter appointing a former city official to a position heading the Office of Economic Opportunity. In plain English, this position is aimed at getting 25 percent of all city contracts to go to minority- or female-owned businesses. But the real kicker is that her salary will be $135,000.
NEWS
September 1, 1990
For a country that's short of cash and repelled by Wall Street greed, this proposal sounds like a winner: Tax the sale of stocks and bonds. At a penny for every $2 worth of securities, such a levy would bring in about $12 billion a year. And it would fall most heavily on the fast-buck artists who buy and sell securities for speculative gain, not long-term investment. Or so the pitch goes. Unfortunately, even though the tax sounds small, it probably would jolt financial markets.
NEWS
May 15, 2011 | By Dan Hardy and John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writers
Facing what some see as the most dire funding crisis in decades, school districts across the region are proposing cuts that could drastically reshape their programs and communities. In district after district, officials have proposed budgets notable for what's missing: busing, kindergarten, athletics, librarians, languages, gym classes. Thousands of area school employees are likely to lose jobs, even as taxes in their districts rise. "This is unlike anything we've seen in the last 50 years," said Lou DeVlieger, superintendent of Upper Darby School District, which plans to cut 47 jobs, draw $4 million from reserves, and raise taxes 2.7 percent.
NEWS
April 12, 2010
MANY have debated the mayor's proposed sugar-sweetened beverage tax, but it would be illegal. Pennsylvania law specifically bans the city from taxing an item that the state already taxes. As anyone who's picked up a six-pack of soda in a supermarket knows, Pennsylvania taxes ALL soft drinks at 6 percent, sugar sweetened or not. Like the state sales tax, the proposed sugar tax would fall on the consumer. If this tax were enacted, we'd pay separate taxes on the same item. In fact, the city designed this tax to fall on the consumer, claiming the goal is to change buying behavior.
NEWS
January 4, 1990 | By Brigette ReDavid, Special to The Inquirer
Narberth's 1990 operating budget of about $1.5 million will require no tax increase after all. According to borough manager William Martin, the 3.28-mill tax increase that had been proposed was offset by unanticipated revenue, including a grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to pick up 75 percent of the $80,000 estimated cost of renovating and building an addition to the borough library. Martin said the borough also received about $80,000 not originally figured into the proposed 1990 budget in reimbursement for compensation pay for a police officer out of work since 1984.
NEWS
December 5, 2013 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
THERE'S A NEW real-estate tax loophole for Philadelphians - and you don't need to be a millionaire to take advantage of it. To limit the huge increases some residents are seeing under the Actual Value Initiative tax-reform effort, the city is launching the Longtime Owner Occupants Program, or LOOP. "I do not create these acronyms, but I think this one is quite interesting," Mayor Nutter said while announcing the program yesterday with City Council members. The program will benefit lower-income homeowners who have been in their homes for at least 10 years and saw their property assessments increase by 300 percent or more this year.
NEWS
October 29, 2008
EVERY potential voter has heard by now that, as president, Barack Obama is going to give a middle-class tax cut and tax subsidies to 95 percent of Americans. These will be funded by income-tax increases on the country's richest 5 percent, in addition to hikes on the capital-gains tax, dividends tax, death tax, payroll tax and windfall-profits tax. You'd think that if 95 percent of Americans would save (or possibly make) money from electing Obama, he would be polling at 95 percent.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 6, 2016 | By Sarah Maiellano
 I've owned a home in Philadelphia for less than a year, and the city just tripled my property taxes. My husband, Joe, and I were both born and raised in Northeast Philly. We lived in Washington for 10 years after college. Last summer, we decided it was time to return home to the city where nearly everyone we love lives - the same city that was named the No. 1 destination in the United States by Lonely Planet and deemed "ready to show itself off to the world" by the New York Times.
NEWS
August 5, 2016
Mayor Kenney's campaign to pass a tax on sweetened beverages hinged on his proposal to spend $91 million annually to expand prekindergarten programs. But $300 million will be used to secure bonds to upgrade libraries, recreation centers, and other facilities, so the public must focus on how that money will be spent. Tough decisions on which facilities should be improved and which ones are too dilapidated or underused to save must be made. Those decisions should be devoid of the political considerations that can crop up when City Council members exercise their "prerogative" in development cases.
NEWS
August 4, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
The American Beverage Association spent more than $10.6 million trying to fight off Mayor Kenney's tax on sweetened drinks, more than four times the amount spent by those supporting the tax, newly released lobbying reports show. The disclosures, filed with the Philadelphia Board of Ethics, also shed light on who funded the pro-tax effort. The list of two dozen backers includes two Philadelphia law firms, the regional Carpenters union, and the mayor's own political committee. Those supporting the tax spent about $2.5 million, according to the disclosure reports.
NEWS
August 3, 2016
ISSUE | ATLANTIC CITY No tax windfall The Casino Reinvestment Development Authority's property development mandate brings significant investment to Atlantic City. The lots we own, in terms of their current value, are insignificant to remediating the city's dire fiscal condition compared with CRDA's ability to assemble properties and leverage projects that create jobs and revenue for the city. CRDA-owned, nontaxable property cannot provide some windfall to the city. CRDA owns 111 acres, yet only 8.5 remain suitable for development.
NEWS
August 3, 2016 | By Claudia Vargas, Staff Writer
Editor's note: This story's online headline has been changed to reflect the correct amount of tax revenue. The city's coffers received an estimated $3 billion in tax revenue, $88 million more than expected, for fiscal year 2016. The added cash was a result of an increase in home sales and job growth, according to the city controller's monthly economic report, released Monday. The report looked at June and also at the full fiscal year, which ended June 30, and compared it with five years prior.
NEWS
August 3, 2016
With his presidential and vice presidential ambitions dashed for at least another four years, one might expect Gov. Christie to stop paying homage to political expediency and make a statesmanlike decision about raising New Jersey's gasoline tax. But he still can't find the high road. Highway projects from Newark to Cape May ground to a halt more than three weeks ago, when Christie, rather than agree to a gas tax hike to replenish the depleted Transportation Trust Fund, decided to stop all spending.
NEWS
July 29, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
As the Democratic National Convention got underway amid pledges to "help working families," members of actual working families were assailing the all-Democratic Gloucester Township Council for authorizing a nearly 12-cent hike in the municipal tax rate. "I don't know how long we can stay here. We're not going to be able to afford it," Jessica Marchese, a 28-year-old teacher who is married to a police officer, told council members Monday. "My pay is not increasing," Marchese, a resident of the Broadmoor section, added.
NEWS
July 28, 2016
By Pete Sepp Democratic party leaders have their work cut out. Coming off a divisive primary, Hillary Clinton faces no small task in bridging divides in the party's core constituency while at the same time articulating a vision capable of retaining the White House come Nov. 8. Late last month, Democratic leaders began drafting the Magna Carta of those efforts: the party's official policy platform, a blueprint of priorities for the months, and...
NEWS
July 24, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
New Jersey's top two Democrats say they have reached an agreement to replenish the state's fund for road and bridge repairs by raising the gas tax, possibly breaking a political impasse that has brought construction on transportation projects to a halt. Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester) and Assembly Speaker Vincent Prieto (D., Hudson) announced a plan Friday to more than double the gas tax to 37.5 cents per gallon while also cutting taxes on estates and retirement income for seniors, and boosting a tax credit for the working poor.
NEWS
July 21, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
The city of Philadelphia is on a hiring spree, sparked by the recently passed sweetened-beverage tax. More than two dozen jobs have been posted since last week, and city officials say more are on the way. They range from data analysts and school-health specialists to a workforce manager for a prekindergarten expansion, all listed as the city prepares to launch both the tax and the programs it will fund. "These are important early steps that we need to take to make sure the programs are implemented effectively," city finance director Rob Dubow said.
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