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NEWS
January 9, 2012
With a first-year record like Gov. Corbett's, it's a good thing he still has three more years to go. Or maybe not. Another three years could give Corbett time to make some progress, at least, toward pressing issues facing the state - like fixing roads and bridges, or making natural-gas drillers pay their fair share. There even may be time to do something about handgun violence that tragically ends hundreds of Pennsylvanians' lives annually (were the governor not such a gun-rights stalwart)
NEWS
October 16, 2014
THE IDEA OF abolishing the School Reform Commission and replacing it with an elected board has recently dominated the conversation about Philadelphia's schools. Most local politicians, the teachers union and even Democratic candidate for governor Tom Wolf favor returning the schools to local control after almost 13 years of state oversight. Whether it happens remains to be seen. The SRC was created by state law and it will take a change in state law to undo it. Presumably that debate can begin next year after the new governor and Legislature are sworn in. Before we get to that point, it's worth thinking about the idea and its implications.
NEWS
March 11, 2012 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
  There's budget trouble in Medford, an affluent Norman Rockwell suburb with two newly renovated fire halls, respected schools, and a variety of lush parks. Despite the recent economic turmoil and the township's apparently insatiable demand for amenities, its tax rate stayed flat from 2006 to 2010 and went up only slightly last year. And that is precisely why the Burlington County community now faces a financial emergency, say leaders of the five-member, all-Republican Town Council and a chorus of budget experts.
NEWS
March 11, 2010
MAYOR NUTTER is constantly crying poor and trying to charge taxpayers more fees or provide fewer services. His new plan is to charge a weekly trash fee to help the city raise needed funds. Then, in the same day's paper is an article on Nutter appointing a former city official to a position heading the Office of Economic Opportunity. In plain English, this position is aimed at getting 25 percent of all city contracts to go to minority- or female-owned businesses. But the real kicker is that her salary will be $135,000.
NEWS
September 1, 1990
For a country that's short of cash and repelled by Wall Street greed, this proposal sounds like a winner: Tax the sale of stocks and bonds. At a penny for every $2 worth of securities, such a levy would bring in about $12 billion a year. And it would fall most heavily on the fast-buck artists who buy and sell securities for speculative gain, not long-term investment. Or so the pitch goes. Unfortunately, even though the tax sounds small, it probably would jolt financial markets.
NEWS
May 15, 2011 | By Dan Hardy and John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writers
Facing what some see as the most dire funding crisis in decades, school districts across the region are proposing cuts that could drastically reshape their programs and communities. In district after district, officials have proposed budgets notable for what's missing: busing, kindergarten, athletics, librarians, languages, gym classes. Thousands of area school employees are likely to lose jobs, even as taxes in their districts rise. "This is unlike anything we've seen in the last 50 years," said Lou DeVlieger, superintendent of Upper Darby School District, which plans to cut 47 jobs, draw $4 million from reserves, and raise taxes 2.7 percent.
NEWS
April 12, 2010
MANY have debated the mayor's proposed sugar-sweetened beverage tax, but it would be illegal. Pennsylvania law specifically bans the city from taxing an item that the state already taxes. As anyone who's picked up a six-pack of soda in a supermarket knows, Pennsylvania taxes ALL soft drinks at 6 percent, sugar sweetened or not. Like the state sales tax, the proposed sugar tax would fall on the consumer. If this tax were enacted, we'd pay separate taxes on the same item. In fact, the city designed this tax to fall on the consumer, claiming the goal is to change buying behavior.
NEWS
January 4, 1990 | By Brigette ReDavid, Special to The Inquirer
Narberth's 1990 operating budget of about $1.5 million will require no tax increase after all. According to borough manager William Martin, the 3.28-mill tax increase that had been proposed was offset by unanticipated revenue, including a grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to pick up 75 percent of the $80,000 estimated cost of renovating and building an addition to the borough library. Martin said the borough also received about $80,000 not originally figured into the proposed 1990 budget in reimbursement for compensation pay for a police officer out of work since 1984.
NEWS
December 5, 2013 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
THERE'S A NEW real-estate tax loophole for Philadelphians - and you don't need to be a millionaire to take advantage of it. To limit the huge increases some residents are seeing under the Actual Value Initiative tax-reform effort, the city is launching the Longtime Owner Occupants Program, or LOOP. "I do not create these acronyms, but I think this one is quite interesting," Mayor Nutter said while announcing the program yesterday with City Council members. The program will benefit lower-income homeowners who have been in their homes for at least 10 years and saw their property assessments increase by 300 percent or more this year.
NEWS
October 29, 2008
EVERY potential voter has heard by now that, as president, Barack Obama is going to give a middle-class tax cut and tax subsidies to 95 percent of Americans. These will be funded by income-tax increases on the country's richest 5 percent, in addition to hikes on the capital-gains tax, dividends tax, death tax, payroll tax and windfall-profits tax. You'd think that if 95 percent of Americans would save (or possibly make) money from electing Obama, he would be polling at 95 percent.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 18, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
City Council on Thursday approved a bill that would make it easier for fast-food firms, hotels, and other traditionally low-wage employers in Philadelphia to pay their workers $12 an hour. If signed into law by Mayor Nutter, an employer would get a $5,000 tax credit for each new full-time worker it hires and pays at least $12 an hour. The tax break would last five years. The bill, sponsored by Councilman W. Wilson Goode Jr. and unanimously approved, comes as some left-leaning groups are campaigning to raise the federal minimum wage to $10.10 an hour, while others want it raised to $15, as Seattle did in June.
BUSINESS
October 17, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
With its share price plunging on stock exchanges in London and New York, drugmaker Shire on Wednesday afternoon waived a technical requirement of its pending agreement with AbbVie in hope that the Chicago company will more quickly rethink its decision Tuesday night to "reconsider" its $54 billion acquisition of Shire. "In order to allow the period of uncertainty for its shareholders, employees, and other stakeholders to be reduced," Shire said in a statement Wednesday, it will waive a requirement that at least three business days must pass before the AbbVie board meets to consider the deal.
NEWS
October 17, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Smokers who figured they could escape Philadelphia's recently enacted $2-per-pack cigarette tax by switching to e-cigarettes could be in for a letdown. City Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown said Thursday that she would introduce legislation that would put a $2 tax on e-cigarettes and a tax on the liquid nicotine they use - with the levy going directly to the underfunded Philadelphia school district. "When we know our school district is starving for revenue," Brown said Wednesday, "every penny counts.
NEWS
October 16, 2014
THE IDEA OF abolishing the School Reform Commission and replacing it with an elected board has recently dominated the conversation about Philadelphia's schools. Most local politicians, the teachers union and even Democratic candidate for governor Tom Wolf favor returning the schools to local control after almost 13 years of state oversight. Whether it happens remains to be seen. The SRC was created by state law and it will take a change in state law to undo it. Presumably that debate can begin next year after the new governor and Legislature are sworn in. Before we get to that point, it's worth thinking about the idea and its implications.
NEWS
October 16, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A TAX PREPARER who falsely listed foster and disabled kids as dependents on clients' tax returns, defrauding the IRS of millions of dollars, pleaded guilty in federal court yesterday. Dauda Koroma, 42, worked at Medmans Financial Services in Southwest Philly. He was one of nine people charged in the case. "I looked out for the client more than the government," Koroma, a citizen of Sierra Leone, told U.S. District Judge Legrome Davis shortly before he entered a guilty plea to charges of conspiracy, filing false tax returns, fraud and aggravated identity theft.
NEWS
October 15, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
While national political attention is fixed on the tense South Jersey race to succeed U.S. Rep. Jon Runyan, a sideshow on the ballot may pack a bigger punch for Burlington County voters. The outcome of the battle between Democrat Aimee Belgard and Republican Tom MacArthur for a seat in the House is not expected to change the Republican hold on that chamber. But the results of the less-noisy contest lower on the ballot could end the GOP's nearly four decades of control over the county's governing body.
NEWS
October 9, 2014
HOW ABOUT some tax talk? Wait, wait, don't leave. This is important, or could be. It's a big part of the governor's race and likely to be a focus of the final debate in Pittsburgh tonight. Republican Gov. Corbett says he should be re-elected for keeping taxes low and because Democrat Tom Wolf will raise taxes - without saying how much. Wolf argues Corbett's management and tax policy hurt education, job creation and state fiscal ratings. Wolf says he just wants to make taxes fairer.
NEWS
October 4, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON A New Jersey legislative panel on Thursday advanced a bill that would prohibit the state from awarding contracts or incentives to companies that reincorporate overseas for the purpose of avoiding U.S. taxes. The move comes as the federal government has sought to crack down on so-called inversions, in which companies restructure abroad without moving their headquarters. A number of U.S. companies, such as Burger King, in recent months have moved to buy firms in other countries so they can incorporate there and lower their tax bills in the U.S. This practice "does our whole economic structure a disservice," Assemblyman Troy Singleton (D., Burlington)
BUSINESS
October 4, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
The tax code is usually better than any pharmaceutical product or a glass of milk for inducing sleep. Tax inversions, however, are still a point of contention where business meets public policy. Thursday brought more debate. Legendary investor and Berkshire Hathaway chief executive Warren Buffett began the day answering questions in New York about his patriotism because of the perception that such foreign acquisitions hurt Americans for the sake of corporate profits. Heather Bresch, CEO of Pittsburgh-based generic drugmaker Mylan, walked into a Philadelphia gathering and tersely declined to talk about them, preferring cancer as a topic.
NEWS
September 29, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - At 66, Audrey Williams is looking for a job to pay the property taxes on the Northside duplex she has owned for 14 years. Although she retired last New Year's Eve after 33 years as a dealer at Resorts and Showboat, recent events are forcing her back to work. Ironically, the casino industry that supported her for more than three decades is shrinking, and causing a severe revenue shortfall for the city. The burgeoning deficit, between what the city used to get from the casinos in property taxes, and what it can extract today with just eight instead of 12 gambling halls, as well as casino tax appeals that have resulted in more than $350 million in refunds by the city, is being passed on to its residents.
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