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NEWS
January 9, 2012
With a first-year record like Gov. Corbett's, it's a good thing he still has three more years to go. Or maybe not. Another three years could give Corbett time to make some progress, at least, toward pressing issues facing the state - like fixing roads and bridges, or making natural-gas drillers pay their fair share. There even may be time to do something about handgun violence that tragically ends hundreds of Pennsylvanians' lives annually (were the governor not such a gun-rights stalwart)
NEWS
March 11, 2012 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
  There's budget trouble in Medford, an affluent Norman Rockwell suburb with two newly renovated fire halls, respected schools, and a variety of lush parks. Despite the recent economic turmoil and the township's apparently insatiable demand for amenities, its tax rate stayed flat from 2006 to 2010 and went up only slightly last year. And that is precisely why the Burlington County community now faces a financial emergency, say leaders of the five-member, all-Republican Town Council and a chorus of budget experts.
NEWS
March 11, 2010
MAYOR NUTTER is constantly crying poor and trying to charge taxpayers more fees or provide fewer services. His new plan is to charge a weekly trash fee to help the city raise needed funds. Then, in the same day's paper is an article on Nutter appointing a former city official to a position heading the Office of Economic Opportunity. In plain English, this position is aimed at getting 25 percent of all city contracts to go to minority- or female-owned businesses. But the real kicker is that her salary will be $135,000.
NEWS
September 1, 1990
For a country that's short of cash and repelled by Wall Street greed, this proposal sounds like a winner: Tax the sale of stocks and bonds. At a penny for every $2 worth of securities, such a levy would bring in about $12 billion a year. And it would fall most heavily on the fast-buck artists who buy and sell securities for speculative gain, not long-term investment. Or so the pitch goes. Unfortunately, even though the tax sounds small, it probably would jolt financial markets.
NEWS
May 15, 2011 | By Dan Hardy and John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writers
Facing what some see as the most dire funding crisis in decades, school districts across the region are proposing cuts that could drastically reshape their programs and communities. In district after district, officials have proposed budgets notable for what's missing: busing, kindergarten, athletics, librarians, languages, gym classes. Thousands of area school employees are likely to lose jobs, even as taxes in their districts rise. "This is unlike anything we've seen in the last 50 years," said Lou DeVlieger, superintendent of Upper Darby School District, which plans to cut 47 jobs, draw $4 million from reserves, and raise taxes 2.7 percent.
NEWS
April 12, 2010
MANY have debated the mayor's proposed sugar-sweetened beverage tax, but it would be illegal. Pennsylvania law specifically bans the city from taxing an item that the state already taxes. As anyone who's picked up a six-pack of soda in a supermarket knows, Pennsylvania taxes ALL soft drinks at 6 percent, sugar sweetened or not. Like the state sales tax, the proposed sugar tax would fall on the consumer. If this tax were enacted, we'd pay separate taxes on the same item. In fact, the city designed this tax to fall on the consumer, claiming the goal is to change buying behavior.
NEWS
August 24, 2010 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia was once again the subject of head-scratching and ridicule on Monday, this time with the "blog tax" controversy. On BuzzFeed, a popular website for stories, photos, and video competing to go viral, "Philadelphia Blogger's License: $300" was in the running, in between videos of a bored cat having a birthday party and Lady Gaga dancing at a Kiss concert. New York magazine's website weighed in, as did the Washington Post's. The New York Daily News had a story about "Cash-strapped Philly" resorting to a blog "tax.
NEWS
January 4, 1990 | By Brigette ReDavid, Special to The Inquirer
Narberth's 1990 operating budget of about $1.5 million will require no tax increase after all. According to borough manager William Martin, the 3.28-mill tax increase that had been proposed was offset by unanticipated revenue, including a grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to pick up 75 percent of the $80,000 estimated cost of renovating and building an addition to the borough library. Martin said the borough also received about $80,000 not originally figured into the proposed 1990 budget in reimbursement for compensation pay for a police officer out of work since 1984.
NEWS
December 5, 2013 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
THERE'S A NEW real-estate tax loophole for Philadelphians - and you don't need to be a millionaire to take advantage of it. To limit the huge increases some residents are seeing under the Actual Value Initiative tax-reform effort, the city is launching the Longtime Owner Occupants Program, or LOOP. "I do not create these acronyms, but I think this one is quite interesting," Mayor Nutter said while announcing the program yesterday with City Council members. The program will benefit lower-income homeowners who have been in their homes for at least 10 years and saw their property assessments increase by 300 percent or more this year.
NEWS
October 29, 2008
EVERY potential voter has heard by now that, as president, Barack Obama is going to give a middle-class tax cut and tax subsidies to 95 percent of Americans. These will be funded by income-tax increases on the country's richest 5 percent, in addition to hikes on the capital-gains tax, dividends tax, death tax, payroll tax and windfall-profits tax. You'd think that if 95 percent of Americans would save (or possibly make) money from electing Obama, he would be polling at 95 percent.
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NEWS
December 11, 2014 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
TRENTON - The New Jersey Economic Development Authority on Tuesday approved $118 million in tax incentives for Subaru of America and an additional $40 million for Cooper Health System to relocate their operations in Camden. The health system, whose Cooper University Hospital already is a major presence in the city, intends to move 353 back-office jobs from Cherry Hill and Mount Laurel to Federal Street in downtown Camden and add 19 new jobs in the city, according to the application made to the EDA. Camden Mayor Dana Redd, who attended the EDA board's meeting, said the projects would help Camden return to its former glory as an economic hub of South Jersey.
NEWS
December 8, 2014 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two months into its passage, the city's new cigarette tax is on track to generate $5 million more this year than expected for Philadelphia's public schools, while also causing subtle and significant shifts across the region. Some city merchants hate the $2-a-pack hike, saying it is costing them customers. Public health experts are cheering it, saying it might lead some of the city's 275,000 smokers to quit - or encourage others to never start. At least one guy said the tax was a blessing - because he sells loose cigarettes on a busy Center City street.
NEWS
December 5, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Rather than taking on the hard work of genuine tax reform, Congress plans to continue its sloppy approach to the issue by extending roughly 50 temporary tax breaks for another year. That sets up another crisis next year. It also means individuals and businesses can't keep accurate budgets because they don't know if their tax breaks will survive the next hostage-taking episode in Washington. The wind energy business, for example, is slumping because a key tax credit expired last year.
NEWS
December 2, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Now that millions of travelers have endured New Jersey's crumbling roads and shaky buses and trains to see loved ones over Thanksgiving, they might consider, perhaps profanely, how the state has failed to maintain these essential arteries by letting the Transportation Trust Fund run dry. Gov. Christie has been a poor steward of the fund. It was created in the 1980s by Gov. Thomas H. Kean to keep the state's roads, bridges, and transit systems in good shape. Christie, however, while refusing to raise taxes, raided funds from a scrapped Hudson River commuter tunnel to pay transportation costs.
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writer
A South Philadelphia labor contractor has pleaded guilty to illegally transporting undocumented workers and failing to pay employment and income taxes. Kim Meas, 60, admitted using 14 shell companies to create the illusion that the workers from his firm were instead employed by the shells. By doing that, prosecutors said, Meas hoped to make the shell firms appear to be responsible for paying taxes, but the shells never paid. Meas ran LS Services Inc., which operated from a variety of addresses in South Philadelphia.
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Montgomery County's commissioners on Thursday presented a $371 million budget proposal for 2015 that would slightly cut expenditures while expanding services and holding the line on taxes. While overall spending would decline 2.5 percent, most of that comes from cuts at Parkhouse, the county nursing facility privatized early this year. The budget calls for an additional $1 million to the human services department, $818,000 more to Montgomery County Community College, and seven new adult-probation officers.
NEWS
November 12, 2014 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Defense contractor Lockheed Martin will receive $107 million in tax credits to operate in Camden, the state Economic Development Authority said Monday. The company will create laboratory facilities in two downtown buildings and move about 250 jobs from the company's headquarters in Moorestown, according to the EDA. The company also has a laboratory in Cherry Hill. The company told the EDA that some of the jobs that will go to Camden are in danger of being eliminated due to increased competition in the defense industry, and that the subsidy will help save them.
NEWS
November 11, 2014
PENNSYLVANIA government is in deep financial trouble and could be facing a $1 billion-plus deficit next year. That is not rhetoric left over from this year's election campaign. It is the judgment of three professional, nonpartisan rating firms that evaluate and rate state and local finances. When Fitch, Standard & Poor's and Moody's Investors Service speak, Wall Street listens. All three lowered Pennsylvania's rating this year, which means that taxpayers will pay higher interest on the hundreds of millions of dollars in bonds floated each year by the state.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
All right, Republicans, here's your chance to help us on the tax front. Congress has not passed any of more than 50 tax provisions that have already expired in 2014. But it has the ability to pass what are referred to as "extenders" for the 2014 tax season. Delays in these extenders could postpone the start of the 2014 tax season, causing financial complications for millions of Americans, says Sandra G. Johnson, president of the National Conference of CPA Practitioners. "Once again, the American public is asked to wait on Congress to pass the extenders.
NEWS
November 10, 2014
ISSUE | WOLF AGENDA Gas, but will it go? Gov.-elect Tom Wolf has a few fracking problems. First, Republicans gained seats in the legislature, making it harder for Wolf to fulfill his campaign promise of a shale tax. Second, with the recent drop in oil prices, fracking is barely profitable, and the boom is about to turn into a bust. So, assuming he can even pass a shale tax, how is he going to fund education on a busted boom? Finally, how would a tax make up for the suffering of residents near fracking sites?
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