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NEWS
May 13, 2016 | By Dom Giordano
MAYOR KENNEY'S proposed tax on sugary drinks has gotten Bernie Sanders, Michael Bloomberg and Warren Buffett to be involved in the debate. Sanders correctly saw the tax as regressive and a burden on poorer Philadelphians. He was chastised by all sorts of big, nanny-state liberals as not understanding that this tax was not just about funding universal prekindergarten. Stephen Stromberg, writing in the Washington Post, said of Sanders' view, "The point of soda taxes is to guide people away from over-consuming a product that no one needs to live and that should be treated as an indulgence.
NEWS
January 9, 2012
With a first-year record like Gov. Corbett's, it's a good thing he still has three more years to go. Or maybe not. Another three years could give Corbett time to make some progress, at least, toward pressing issues facing the state - like fixing roads and bridges, or making natural-gas drillers pay their fair share. There even may be time to do something about handgun violence that tragically ends hundreds of Pennsylvanians' lives annually (were the governor not such a gun-rights stalwart)
NEWS
March 11, 2012 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
  There's budget trouble in Medford, an affluent Norman Rockwell suburb with two newly renovated fire halls, respected schools, and a variety of lush parks. Despite the recent economic turmoil and the township's apparently insatiable demand for amenities, its tax rate stayed flat from 2006 to 2010 and went up only slightly last year. And that is precisely why the Burlington County community now faces a financial emergency, say leaders of the five-member, all-Republican Town Council and a chorus of budget experts.
NEWS
March 11, 2010
MAYOR NUTTER is constantly crying poor and trying to charge taxpayers more fees or provide fewer services. His new plan is to charge a weekly trash fee to help the city raise needed funds. Then, in the same day's paper is an article on Nutter appointing a former city official to a position heading the Office of Economic Opportunity. In plain English, this position is aimed at getting 25 percent of all city contracts to go to minority- or female-owned businesses. But the real kicker is that her salary will be $135,000.
NEWS
September 1, 1990
For a country that's short of cash and repelled by Wall Street greed, this proposal sounds like a winner: Tax the sale of stocks and bonds. At a penny for every $2 worth of securities, such a levy would bring in about $12 billion a year. And it would fall most heavily on the fast-buck artists who buy and sell securities for speculative gain, not long-term investment. Or so the pitch goes. Unfortunately, even though the tax sounds small, it probably would jolt financial markets.
NEWS
May 15, 2011 | By Dan Hardy and John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writers
Facing what some see as the most dire funding crisis in decades, school districts across the region are proposing cuts that could drastically reshape their programs and communities. In district after district, officials have proposed budgets notable for what's missing: busing, kindergarten, athletics, librarians, languages, gym classes. Thousands of area school employees are likely to lose jobs, even as taxes in their districts rise. "This is unlike anything we've seen in the last 50 years," said Lou DeVlieger, superintendent of Upper Darby School District, which plans to cut 47 jobs, draw $4 million from reserves, and raise taxes 2.7 percent.
NEWS
April 12, 2010
MANY have debated the mayor's proposed sugar-sweetened beverage tax, but it would be illegal. Pennsylvania law specifically bans the city from taxing an item that the state already taxes. As anyone who's picked up a six-pack of soda in a supermarket knows, Pennsylvania taxes ALL soft drinks at 6 percent, sugar sweetened or not. Like the state sales tax, the proposed sugar tax would fall on the consumer. If this tax were enacted, we'd pay separate taxes on the same item. In fact, the city designed this tax to fall on the consumer, claiming the goal is to change buying behavior.
NEWS
January 4, 1990 | By Brigette ReDavid, Special to The Inquirer
Narberth's 1990 operating budget of about $1.5 million will require no tax increase after all. According to borough manager William Martin, the 3.28-mill tax increase that had been proposed was offset by unanticipated revenue, including a grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to pick up 75 percent of the $80,000 estimated cost of renovating and building an addition to the borough library. Martin said the borough also received about $80,000 not originally figured into the proposed 1990 budget in reimbursement for compensation pay for a police officer out of work since 1984.
NEWS
December 5, 2013 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
THERE'S A NEW real-estate tax loophole for Philadelphians - and you don't need to be a millionaire to take advantage of it. To limit the huge increases some residents are seeing under the Actual Value Initiative tax-reform effort, the city is launching the Longtime Owner Occupants Program, or LOOP. "I do not create these acronyms, but I think this one is quite interesting," Mayor Nutter said while announcing the program yesterday with City Council members. The program will benefit lower-income homeowners who have been in their homes for at least 10 years and saw their property assessments increase by 300 percent or more this year.
NEWS
October 29, 2008
EVERY potential voter has heard by now that, as president, Barack Obama is going to give a middle-class tax cut and tax subsidies to 95 percent of Americans. These will be funded by income-tax increases on the country's richest 5 percent, in addition to hikes on the capital-gains tax, dividends tax, death tax, payroll tax and windfall-profits tax. You'd think that if 95 percent of Americans would save (or possibly make) money from electing Obama, he would be polling at 95 percent.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 24, 2016
Think Pennsylvania taxes should be fairer, more sensible? Think every sector of the economy should be taxed equally? Think our CNI (corporate net income) tax rate, the nation's second highest, has anything to do with a job-growth ranking of 41st among the states? Well, a new book, Pennsylvania Illustrated: A Visual Guide to Taxes & the Economy , dips into the complex stew of state tax structure and suggests ours could use some stirring. The gist? Our evolution over 50 years from a goods-based economy to a service economy hasn't been matched by our tax system, which pretty much stayed the same.
NEWS
May 21, 2016
ISSUE | SODA TAX Unions need to stand together against levy Philadelphia unions that are supporting Mayor Kenney's regressive 3-cents-an-ounce sugary-drinks tax don't have all the facts. The Teamsters stand against the tax because we would lose as many as 2,000 members' jobs if it passes, which would be a devastating blow. As president of the Pennsylvania Conference of Teamsters and vice president of the Eastern Region, I support every union in this state. If any government or corporate entity attacked a core industry of another union the way Philadelphia is attacking the beverage industry - to the Teamsters' detriment - we would be at their side.
NEWS
May 21, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny and Julia Terruso, STAFF WRITERS
As friction over Mayor Kenney's sugary drinks tax emerged in City Council on Thursday, momentum still seemed to be moving in one direction - toward funding an expansion of prekindergarten. An alternative revenue stream was proposed. Members opposed to Kenney's tax said that option, a beverage container tax, was one they could stomach. And Council President Darrell L. Clarke vowed that the body would reach consensus - while introducing his own competing plan for how pre-K should be implemented.
BUSINESS
May 21, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, STAFF WRITER
Chinatown businessman Yong Quan Zheng, who operated construction and money services businesses, has been charged with dodging state and federal taxes by filing false documents and paying employees - some of them illegal immigrants - in cash. Zheng's attorney, Greg Pagano, could not be immediately reached for comment. The U.S. Attorney said that Zheng, 61, who owned Hong Fai General Contractors, later known as Yong General Contractors, hired employees and paid them in cash from October 2010 through June 30, 2012.
NEWS
May 20, 2016 | By Barry M. Popkin
MAJOR RESISTANCE in the seven other countries proposing or adopting taxes on sugar-sweetened drinks has come from the beverage industry. However, it's only in the United States where a prominent progressive voice such as Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders has offered strident opposition. In other countries, such as the United Kingdom, France and Mexico, progressives have promoted these taxes. The beverage industry and the few progressives who align with it call these taxes "regressive," warning that they that hurt the poor.
NEWS
May 20, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
City Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown on Thursday plans to introduce a tax on beverage containers as an alternative to Mayor Kenney's proposed tax on sugary drinks. Containers would be taxed at a rate of 15 cents each, a source familiar with Reynolds Brown's proposal said. The councilwoman's office on Wednesday confirmed that she would introduce the "container tax," which has been levied elsewhere on products ranging from beer to bottled water. It did not say what rate she was seeking, or provide a list of products that would be affected, but said the tax would bring in at least $64 million annually.
NEWS
May 19, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Before and after Anthony M. Lario was a New Jersey Superior Court judge, daughter Lynn Miller said, he was proud of his work as a pro bono lawyer. "I can't tell you how many times there were food items and pastries left on our back steps," Miller said. "Left by people he would help and not charge. " Those clients, she said, were often "a lot of immigrants . . . people he knew could not afford it. " On Sunday, May 15, Judge Lario, 95, of Cherry Hill, a Superior Court judge in Tax Court from 1979 to 1990, died at Methodist Hospital.
NEWS
May 17, 2016
ISSUE | SODA TAX Reducing the levy would harm the city I urge City Council President Darrell L. Clarke to support Mayor Kenney's proposed 3-cents-an-ounce tax on sugary beverages instead of cutting it to 1 cent an ounce or less ("Clarke floats smaller drink tax," Thursday). This tax would improve the health of thousands of Philadelphians. It would help, not harm, those being singled out as likely to be hurt by this tax. Many people do not understand the harmful effects of sugar, including weight gain and diabetes.
NEWS
May 17, 2016
By Robert P. Inman City Council is holding hearings and gathering the views of Philadelphians on Mayor Kenney's proposal of pre-K education that would be paid for by a 3-cent-per-ounce tax on sodas. The estimated $96 million raised from the tax annually would allow 6,500 additional children to receive a pre-K education each year. James Heckman. the Nobel Prize-winning economist, has estimated the social benefits of pre-K in higher lifetime earnings and lower crime and welfare spending to be $12 per dollar invested in each child.
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