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NEWS
January 9, 2012
With a first-year record like Gov. Corbett's, it's a good thing he still has three more years to go. Or maybe not. Another three years could give Corbett time to make some progress, at least, toward pressing issues facing the state - like fixing roads and bridges, or making natural-gas drillers pay their fair share. There even may be time to do something about handgun violence that tragically ends hundreds of Pennsylvanians' lives annually (were the governor not such a gun-rights stalwart)
NEWS
March 11, 2012 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
  There's budget trouble in Medford, an affluent Norman Rockwell suburb with two newly renovated fire halls, respected schools, and a variety of lush parks. Despite the recent economic turmoil and the township's apparently insatiable demand for amenities, its tax rate stayed flat from 2006 to 2010 and went up only slightly last year. And that is precisely why the Burlington County community now faces a financial emergency, say leaders of the five-member, all-Republican Town Council and a chorus of budget experts.
NEWS
March 11, 2010
MAYOR NUTTER is constantly crying poor and trying to charge taxpayers more fees or provide fewer services. His new plan is to charge a weekly trash fee to help the city raise needed funds. Then, in the same day's paper is an article on Nutter appointing a former city official to a position heading the Office of Economic Opportunity. In plain English, this position is aimed at getting 25 percent of all city contracts to go to minority- or female-owned businesses. But the real kicker is that her salary will be $135,000.
NEWS
September 1, 1990
For a country that's short of cash and repelled by Wall Street greed, this proposal sounds like a winner: Tax the sale of stocks and bonds. At a penny for every $2 worth of securities, such a levy would bring in about $12 billion a year. And it would fall most heavily on the fast-buck artists who buy and sell securities for speculative gain, not long-term investment. Or so the pitch goes. Unfortunately, even though the tax sounds small, it probably would jolt financial markets.
NEWS
May 15, 2011 | By Dan Hardy and John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writers
Facing what some see as the most dire funding crisis in decades, school districts across the region are proposing cuts that could drastically reshape their programs and communities. In district after district, officials have proposed budgets notable for what's missing: busing, kindergarten, athletics, librarians, languages, gym classes. Thousands of area school employees are likely to lose jobs, even as taxes in their districts rise. "This is unlike anything we've seen in the last 50 years," said Lou DeVlieger, superintendent of Upper Darby School District, which plans to cut 47 jobs, draw $4 million from reserves, and raise taxes 2.7 percent.
NEWS
April 12, 2010
MANY have debated the mayor's proposed sugar-sweetened beverage tax, but it would be illegal. Pennsylvania law specifically bans the city from taxing an item that the state already taxes. As anyone who's picked up a six-pack of soda in a supermarket knows, Pennsylvania taxes ALL soft drinks at 6 percent, sugar sweetened or not. Like the state sales tax, the proposed sugar tax would fall on the consumer. If this tax were enacted, we'd pay separate taxes on the same item. In fact, the city designed this tax to fall on the consumer, claiming the goal is to change buying behavior.
NEWS
January 4, 1990 | By Brigette ReDavid, Special to The Inquirer
Narberth's 1990 operating budget of about $1.5 million will require no tax increase after all. According to borough manager William Martin, the 3.28-mill tax increase that had been proposed was offset by unanticipated revenue, including a grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to pick up 75 percent of the $80,000 estimated cost of renovating and building an addition to the borough library. Martin said the borough also received about $80,000 not originally figured into the proposed 1990 budget in reimbursement for compensation pay for a police officer out of work since 1984.
NEWS
December 5, 2013 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
THERE'S A NEW real-estate tax loophole for Philadelphians - and you don't need to be a millionaire to take advantage of it. To limit the huge increases some residents are seeing under the Actual Value Initiative tax-reform effort, the city is launching the Longtime Owner Occupants Program, or LOOP. "I do not create these acronyms, but I think this one is quite interesting," Mayor Nutter said while announcing the program yesterday with City Council members. The program will benefit lower-income homeowners who have been in their homes for at least 10 years and saw their property assessments increase by 300 percent or more this year.
NEWS
October 29, 2008
EVERY potential voter has heard by now that, as president, Barack Obama is going to give a middle-class tax cut and tax subsidies to 95 percent of Americans. These will be funded by income-tax increases on the country's richest 5 percent, in addition to hikes on the capital-gains tax, dividends tax, death tax, payroll tax and windfall-profits tax. You'd think that if 95 percent of Americans would save (or possibly make) money from electing Obama, he would be polling at 95 percent.
NEWS
May 28, 1996 | Daily News Wire Services
A day after Sen. Bob Dole was said to be poised to unveil a dramatic package of measures to cut and simplify taxes, the Republican presidential candidate courted blue-collar, swing voters in the battleground state of New Jersey. "I think he is going to do something very bold," magazine publisher Steve Forbes, a former Dole rival and a leading proponent of the flat tax, said over the weekend on NBC's "Meet the Press. " During the primary campaign, Forbes had run advertisements criticizing Dole's past votes for higher taxes and his lack of a tax reform plan.
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SPORTS
January 22, 2015 | By David Murphy, Daily News Columnist
READING - It's a complicated time to rebuild a baseball franchise. Take, for instance, the case of a player who, by all accounts, has a very good chance to become the kind of star who can anchor such an effort. According to people who cover amateur baseball for a living, Cuban prospect Yoan Moncada would be in the running to be the top pick in the 2015 draft if he were eligible. Those same people say he is a 19-year-old infielder with good power, an impressive frame, and plus-plus speed.
NEWS
January 21, 2015 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
WHEN ADRIAN Rios arrived in Philadelphia nearly four years ago to begin his studies on the ivy-clad campus of the University of Pennsylvania, the East Los Angeles native was increasingly drawn to political issues, from the plight of Palestinians to a labor fight involving Penn's cafeteria workers. But most of his classmates stayed on the sidelines. That's why it was a life-altering experience - "exciting and nerve-racking," he recalls - last month when he found himself amid about 100 student protesters lying on the floor of a large, heated tent in a protest at Penn president Amy Gutmann's house.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The loss of 8,000 jobs in Atlantic City's casino industry in the last 12 months has sent shock waves through the region's economy, but an even more precipitous collapse is underway in the city's property-tax base. Eight or nine years ago, casinos owned 85 percent of Atlantic City's real estate, based on assessed values, Mayor Don Guardian said last week. Now, they account for about 55 percent of the assessed values and are expected to keep falling, he said. A proposal by New Jersey Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester)
NEWS
January 20, 2015
AMID THE pomp of ceremony of Tom Wolf's inauguration as governor tomorrow, we are sure to hear soothing words from all parties about the need for compromise, about moving the state forward and about bipartisanship. The challenge - again for all involved - is how to make them real and not simply an exercise in hollow rhetoric, blown away by the winds of January almost as soon as they are uttered. Most of the political experts fear that we are in for another period of paralysis, with a Democratic governor and a Republican-controlled legislature caught in a freeze-frame of conflict over nearly every important issue.
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two Marlton car washes received a visit Friday from a state tax investigator in a black Jaguar after a caller told Gov. Christie on a radio show Thursday night that a car wash in the township was not making customers pay sales taxes. The sudden visits surprised the owners of Promenade Car Wash and Marlton Classic Car Wash-Lube, both of whom said they charge the tax. "It came out of left field," said Mike Ambrosini, who owns Promenade, on Route 73. He showed an investigator from the Treasury Department's division of taxation his cash register and business certificates.
NEWS
January 17, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
State legislation has been proposed to keep world class entertainment in Atlantic City by giving performers a tax break as an incentive to appear in the flagging casino resort. Senate Minority Leader Thomas H. Kean Jr. announced legislation on Thursday that would qualify A list entertainers to not have to pay income taxes on money they earn performing anywhere in New Jersey if they book a gig in a venue in Atlantic City's tourist district for four dates within the same calendar year.
NEWS
January 12, 2015 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
With the onset of the 2015 tax-filing season, here are cautionary tales of a man and a woman whom you don't want preparing your taxes. The Department of Justice and the Internal Revenue Service highlight some of the brightest red flags among fraudulent tax preparers. These two local folks were doozies. In 2013, "Archie" - full name, Adekunle Adetayo Adeolu - was sentenced to prison and $135,519 in restitution after filing false tax returns. He operated Adeolu & Okojie, a tax-service business in Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
January 12, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
One in a continuing series spotlighting real estate markets in the region's communities.   Like love and marriage, West Goshen and West Chester go together like a horse and carriage. It's not that West Goshen Township, which surrounds the Chester County seat, can't stand on its own. It's simply that West Chester's growing restaurant scene and other amenities have made it a destination for those living in the towns nearby. The fact that West Goshen is just minutes away from the borough's downtown gives its residents a head start on parking.
NEWS
January 10, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - The new method of casino taxation under consideration by state legislators could have an unintended casualty: the highly regarded Atlantic City Free Public Library. State legislators acknowledged Thursday that the Atlantic City recovery bills, as currently written, would leave the library in the lurch for much of its current $5 million budget. Library director Maureen Sherr-Frank said Thursday that it would remove 70 percent of the funding. Marshall Spevak, aide to State Sen. Vincent Mazzeo, said legislators would seek a remedy in the bill to prevent any drastic impact on the library, which also operates a branch on Richmond Avenue, and the city's historical museum and archives.
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