FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 9, 2012
With a first-year record like Gov. Corbett's, it's a good thing he still has three more years to go. Or maybe not. Another three years could give Corbett time to make some progress, at least, toward pressing issues facing the state - like fixing roads and bridges, or making natural-gas drillers pay their fair share. There even may be time to do something about handgun violence that tragically ends hundreds of Pennsylvanians' lives annually (were the governor not such a gun-rights stalwart)
NEWS
March 11, 2012 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
  There's budget trouble in Medford, an affluent Norman Rockwell suburb with two newly renovated fire halls, respected schools, and a variety of lush parks. Despite the recent economic turmoil and the township's apparently insatiable demand for amenities, its tax rate stayed flat from 2006 to 2010 and went up only slightly last year. And that is precisely why the Burlington County community now faces a financial emergency, say leaders of the five-member, all-Republican Town Council and a chorus of budget experts.
NEWS
March 11, 2010
MAYOR NUTTER is constantly crying poor and trying to charge taxpayers more fees or provide fewer services. His new plan is to charge a weekly trash fee to help the city raise needed funds. Then, in the same day's paper is an article on Nutter appointing a former city official to a position heading the Office of Economic Opportunity. In plain English, this position is aimed at getting 25 percent of all city contracts to go to minority- or female-owned businesses. But the real kicker is that her salary will be $135,000.
NEWS
September 1, 1990
For a country that's short of cash and repelled by Wall Street greed, this proposal sounds like a winner: Tax the sale of stocks and bonds. At a penny for every $2 worth of securities, such a levy would bring in about $12 billion a year. And it would fall most heavily on the fast-buck artists who buy and sell securities for speculative gain, not long-term investment. Or so the pitch goes. Unfortunately, even though the tax sounds small, it probably would jolt financial markets.
NEWS
May 15, 2011 | By Dan Hardy and John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writers
Facing what some see as the most dire funding crisis in decades, school districts across the region are proposing cuts that could drastically reshape their programs and communities. In district after district, officials have proposed budgets notable for what's missing: busing, kindergarten, athletics, librarians, languages, gym classes. Thousands of area school employees are likely to lose jobs, even as taxes in their districts rise. "This is unlike anything we've seen in the last 50 years," said Lou DeVlieger, superintendent of Upper Darby School District, which plans to cut 47 jobs, draw $4 million from reserves, and raise taxes 2.7 percent.
NEWS
April 12, 2010
MANY have debated the mayor's proposed sugar-sweetened beverage tax, but it would be illegal. Pennsylvania law specifically bans the city from taxing an item that the state already taxes. As anyone who's picked up a six-pack of soda in a supermarket knows, Pennsylvania taxes ALL soft drinks at 6 percent, sugar sweetened or not. Like the state sales tax, the proposed sugar tax would fall on the consumer. If this tax were enacted, we'd pay separate taxes on the same item. In fact, the city designed this tax to fall on the consumer, claiming the goal is to change buying behavior.
NEWS
January 4, 1990 | By Brigette ReDavid, Special to The Inquirer
Narberth's 1990 operating budget of about $1.5 million will require no tax increase after all. According to borough manager William Martin, the 3.28-mill tax increase that had been proposed was offset by unanticipated revenue, including a grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to pick up 75 percent of the $80,000 estimated cost of renovating and building an addition to the borough library. Martin said the borough also received about $80,000 not originally figured into the proposed 1990 budget in reimbursement for compensation pay for a police officer out of work since 1984.
NEWS
December 5, 2013 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
THERE'S A NEW real-estate tax loophole for Philadelphians - and you don't need to be a millionaire to take advantage of it. To limit the huge increases some residents are seeing under the Actual Value Initiative tax-reform effort, the city is launching the Longtime Owner Occupants Program, or LOOP. "I do not create these acronyms, but I think this one is quite interesting," Mayor Nutter said while announcing the program yesterday with City Council members. The program will benefit lower-income homeowners who have been in their homes for at least 10 years and saw their property assessments increase by 300 percent or more this year.
NEWS
October 29, 2008
EVERY potential voter has heard by now that, as president, Barack Obama is going to give a middle-class tax cut and tax subsidies to 95 percent of Americans. These will be funded by income-tax increases on the country's richest 5 percent, in addition to hikes on the capital-gains tax, dividends tax, death tax, payroll tax and windfall-profits tax. You'd think that if 95 percent of Americans would save (or possibly make) money from electing Obama, he would be polling at 95 percent.
NEWS
May 28, 1996 | Daily News Wire Services
A day after Sen. Bob Dole was said to be poised to unveil a dramatic package of measures to cut and simplify taxes, the Republican presidential candidate courted blue-collar, swing voters in the battleground state of New Jersey. "I think he is going to do something very bold," magazine publisher Steve Forbes, a former Dole rival and a leading proponent of the flat tax, said over the weekend on NBC's "Meet the Press. " During the primary campaign, Forbes had run advertisements criticizing Dole's past votes for higher taxes and his lack of a tax reform plan.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 31, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
Tens of thousands of Philadelphia's poorest citizens leave millions of dollars in federal tax credits on the table each tax season. This year, the city is making a new effort to see that money claimed. The city announced Friday that it will provide free tax preparation services at nearly 30 locations for many who are eligible for the federal Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), part of an outreach program called "You Earned It. " An estimated 40,000 Philadelphians eligible for the tax credit have not taken it, leaving about $100 million in tax credits unclaimed, according to the city's revenue department.
NEWS
January 28, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
A Kensington man who got tired of paying "rent" for the right to sell heroin on a city street corner was sentenced to two consecutive life prison terms Tuesday in the 2013 slayings of the would-be leasing agent and her boyfriend. Philadelphia Common Pleas Court Judge J. Scott O'Keefe on Tuesday convicted Alfred Whitefield, 44, on two counts of first-degree murder and weapons offenses in the deaths of Carmen Medina, 31, and her boyfriend, Thomas Gorman, 39, who were gunned down in front of her horrified 11-year-old son. Authorities said Whitefield "executed" Medina because he did not want to continue paying her family the $500-a-week fee it charged for his use of the corner of Swanson and Somerset Streets in Kensington.
NEWS
January 27, 2016
ISSUE | PA. BUDGET Withhold taxes It has been nearly seven months since Pennsylvania's government failed in its basic responsibility to pass a budget. This inaction has consequences: Many nonprofits, school districts, and others in the state are hurting from the lack of funding. As Pennsylvania citizens, we don't have to facilitate this. We have the means to effectively pressure our elected officials to get this task done. I urge all state residents - regardless of political affiliation - and businesses to suspend sending their state taxes to Harrisburg.
BUSINESS
January 19, 2016
Yay, it's tax season. The IRS and Free File Alliance on Friday launched "Free File" - a free way to file your income tax returns. For 2016, there are updates to Free File, including more free state tax returns, and this year, the alliance includes 13 tax-software providers. Taxpayers with $62,000 or less in adjusted gross income during 2015 are eligible for Free File. That's $2,000 more in earnings than the previous year. More than 70 percent of all taxpayers - 100 million people - fall into this category.
NEWS
January 14, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
The New Jersey Economic Development Authority approved $68.3 million in tax credits Tuesday toward the development of Stockton University's planned residential campus in Atlantic City. The EDA approved up to $38.4 million for construction of a residence hall and academic building and up to $29.9 million for construction of a parking garage. The project is planned for about six acres at the southern end of Atlantic City, by the intersection of Atlantic, Albany, and Pacific Avenues. "This is another positive step in developing the public-private partnerships that will enable Stockton to move forward with the AC Devco project for a residential campus and academic facilities, benefiting both our students and the region," said Harvey Kesselman, president of Stockton.
NEWS
December 22, 2015 | By Geoffrey L. Beauchamp and Jonathan Calpas
The Affordable Care Act will impose a 40 percent excise tax on employer-sponsored health coverage that costs more than $10,200 for single and $27,500 for family coverage. This "Cadillac tax" will also hit cost-control measures that have become increasingly popular with employers and employees alike: flexible spending arrangements, health savings accounts, and on-site employer health clinics. Private employers might be able to avoid the tax by unilaterally reducing employee health benefits.
NEWS
December 19, 2015
NORRISTOWN - Montgomery County commissioners passed a $390 million 2016 operating budget Thursday with a 9.8 percent tax increase. The budget is "clearly honest and clearly fiscally responsible," said Josh Shapiro, chairman of the county commissioners. Officials have attributed the increase in taxes to rising costs of debt service, inmate health care, and an arbitration award for corrections officers at the county jail. The tax rate for 2016 will be $3.45 for every $1,000 in assessed value.
NEWS
December 19, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
New Jersey lawmakers want to give more tax credits to businesses that agree to move to areas around the state's colleges and universities. The bill was first introduced in 2005 and has been reintroduced every session since. On Thursday, it was approved by the Assembly. Since the Senate passed it last week, it now goes to Gov. Christie's desk. It would create "innovation zones" in areas around campuses, giving tax incentives to companies that move there. Advisory boards would decide what types of industry to support in each zone.
NEWS
December 16, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - A Republican state senator unveiled a plan Monday to replenish New Jersey's near-depleted transportation fund without raising the tax on gasoline. Sen. Jennifer Beck (R., Monmouth) said a combination of economic growth based on conservative revenue projections, scaling back public employees' health benefits as Gov. Christie has called for, and increasing fines on motor vehicle violations such as texting while driving would help provide $1.6 billion annually for seven years to the Transportation Trust Fund.
NEWS
December 14, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Once upon a time, there was a peep-show business that paid taxes. But the United Adult Book Store at 1826 Atlantic Ave. was bought and torn down by the state's Casino Reinvestment Development Authority last year, becoming part of a vast inventory of land tax-exempt under state law. Hundreds of parcels are land banked by the agency, which is charged with taking a tax from casinos to be an agent of economic redevelopment. But with the Atlantic City economy tanking, many current projects are stalled, leaving empty lots and millions of dollars off tax rolls.
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