CollectionsTax Abatement
IN THE NEWS

Tax Abatement

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 4, 1991 | By Louis R. Carlozo, Special to The Inquirer
Franklin Township officials have a simple refrain for their new tax abatement package. It goes something like this: We are not Washington Township. There, tax abatement has been nothing short of a disaster, Franklin officials said. Since approving a plan to give tax relief to local businesses in October 1989, Washington politicians have debated it and picked it apart - without putting it to much use. "We've read with less than bated breath the )lack of) success they've had," Mayor Harry Kennedy Jr. said at the first meeting of Franklin's tax abatement committee March 26. "It seems there have been many charges of favoritism, posturing.
NEWS
August 15, 1991 | By Edward Ohlbaum, Special to The Inquirer
The Central Bucks school board will reopen its 1991-92 budget the last week of this month to "abate" the district's real estate taxes as a result of the commonwealth's picking up more than its anticipated share of school funding. For those who have already paid their taxes - an estimated 80 percent of the district's taxpayers - it could mean they will get small rebate checks by mail. "All this is doing is giving the taxpayers back the money so the state can take it back from them," member Geryl McMullin said at the board's meeting Tuesday night.
NEWS
October 17, 1990 | By John D. Shabe, Special to The Inquirer
West Deptford developer Anthony Guzzo left Thursday's Washington Township Council meeting a happy man. The council had approved his application for tax abatement, a decision that would save him almost $96,000 in property taxes during the first year that his planned Fries Mill Pavilion office park is in operation. But Guzzo's mood soured after a midnight phone call informing him he had not received the tax breaks after all. Minutes after he had left Thursday's meeting, the council had reversed itself and denied Guzzo's application.
NEWS
March 28, 1990 | By Burr Van Atta, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Greater Bustleton Civic League called Monday for repeal of the city's tax abatement program on new construction. Anticipating a call for tax increases in the mayor's budget address, to be delivered tomorrow night, the organization voted unanimously for repeal of the abatement program. Moments later, the 35 league members - meeting on the porch of the Bavarian Charity Society at 9940 Haldeman Ave. because of an error in scheduling - voted support for a suggestion that all construction be halted until "more police and firemen are sent up here.
NEWS
September 19, 1991 | By Karen McAllister, Special to The Inquirer
Phoenixville Borough Council for two hours Tuesday night heard testimony about slum landlords, apathetic business owners and firetrap buildings, all the while looking for recommendations on a proposed tax abatement program. "I don't think that much was accomplished. We got more knowledge of what it was all about. But I don't know what you would really call accomplishment," Councilman John Fedora said yesterday morning. The hearing sought recommendations from residents and council members for boundaries for commercial and residential areas to be included in a Local Economic Revitalization Tax Assistance Act (LERTA)
NEWS
July 5, 2005 | MARK ALAN HUGHES
A FEW YEARS ago, I bought a condo in Old City for my parents because they were looking for an excellent adventure to begin their retirement. After a couple of years of daily walks across the Ben, foreign movies at the Ritz and First Friday gallery-hopping, they've settled back into their Midwestern small town to grow old with the friends they've known since childhood. It was a great experience for all concerned. But, frankly, I'm glad it's over, because worrying about whether my newly hipster parents were home safe every Saturday night was a little too weird for me. Last year, I sold the condo and made some money.
NEWS
June 29, 1990 | By Thomas Turcol, Inquirer Staff Writer
City Council yesterday lifted the cap on residential tax abatements in an attempt to encourage new development. The measure, overwhelmingly approved by Council, exempts all new residential developments from paying taxes for three years after construction. The city had allowed a 100 percent tax abatement on the first $70,000 of market value of a new home or condominium. Extending the tax break to all new residential construction without regard to a property's cost was a victory for developers who said they needed the abatements to offset other high taxes and the generally high cost of doing business in the city.
NEWS
August 15, 1990 | By John D. Shabe, Special to The Inquirer
Four applications for commercial-property tax breaks, including $8,231 for a proposed sports-medicine clinic at Lakeside Plaza, will be considered tomorrow by the Washington Township Council. The applications are the first batch to be reviewed since the council passed an ordinance over the winter allowing it to approve property tax cuts, also known as abatements, for new businesses. The tax-abatement program, which has been approved by the state, was designed to entice businesses to the township by offering a property tax break during their first five years of operation.
NEWS
March 18, 1992 | By Ross Kerber, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Investigators from the state Attorney General's Office have collected subpoenaed records of Washington Township's tax abatement program, which was abolished last fall after two council members asked the state to look into possible criminal wrongdoing. Investigators delivered a subpoena and picked up the records two weeks ago, said township business administrator Douglas Chastain. They returned Monday to pick up copies of the tax abatement ordinance. A spokesman from the Attorney General's Office would not comment on the subpoenas, nor would he confirm the existence of an investigation into the abatement program.
NEWS
July 7, 2016
ISSUE | PHILADELPHIA DEVELOPMENT Build on gains and improve schools For all the complaining about Philadelphia's 10-year tax abatement, consider that the city and the region saw nearly $7.4 billion in new construction and major renovation between 2013 and 2015 ("Learning the drill," Thursday). That construction added 27,700 jobs and is revitalizing trade schools. This is taxpaying, home-buying, community-developing job creation. The abatement has revitalized entire neighborhoods, with developers risking financial ruin by building bigger homes - for less money and lower taxes - in fringe communities.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 6, 2016 | By Sarah Maiellano
 I've owned a home in Philadelphia for less than a year, and the city just tripled my property taxes. My husband, Joe, and I were both born and raised in Northeast Philly. We lived in Washington for 10 years after college. Last summer, we decided it was time to return home to the city where nearly everyone we love lives - the same city that was named the No. 1 destination in the United States by Lonely Planet and deemed "ready to show itself off to the world" by the New York Times.
REAL_ESTATE
July 25, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, Staff Writer
In the space tagged either "The Build" or "The Art of the Deal" in this section, I try to strike a balance between market-rate and affordable-housing developments in the city and the suburbs. I find the projects that are rising in the "edge" neighborhoods the most interesting ones. Because I have been writing about real estate here since 1989, I have seen these neighborhoods in various stages of decline and development. Although you might have issues with some of the ramifications of development, it's safe to say that most of us prefer it to continued decline.
NEWS
July 7, 2016
ISSUE | PHILADELPHIA DEVELOPMENT Build on gains and improve schools For all the complaining about Philadelphia's 10-year tax abatement, consider that the city and the region saw nearly $7.4 billion in new construction and major renovation between 2013 and 2015 ("Learning the drill," Thursday). That construction added 27,700 jobs and is revitalizing trade schools. This is taxpaying, home-buying, community-developing job creation. The abatement has revitalized entire neighborhoods, with developers risking financial ruin by building bigger homes - for less money and lower taxes - in fringe communities.
NEWS
June 28, 2016
ISSUE | TAXES State funds also needed for Phila. pre-K While the passage of the soda tax is good news for Philadelphia's pre-K children, Mayor Kenney's plan to serve 10,000 children counts on additional funding from the state. I recently met with state legislators as part of the Pre-K for PA campaign, which is recommending $90 million in additional pre-K funding in the 2016-17 state budget. State Reps. Dwight Evans and Joanna McClinton reiterated their commitment to pre-K.
NEWS
June 23, 2016
ISSUE | TAXES Alter abatement tax Cheers to architecture columnist Inga Saffron for casting a light on what has become a tax boondoggle - the 10-year real estate tax abatement. ("With soda tax done, let's retool abatement," June 17). Philadelphia has one of the most liberal, untargeted abatements in the nation. As Saffron points out, historic and vintage buildings that define neighborhoods are destroyed to obtain the abatement, and the public school system is deprived of tens of millions of dollars in critical funding.
NEWS
April 23, 2016 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Something is actually happening at the former Revel Casino Hotel. Owner Glenn Straub, whose stated plans for the massive property have veered erratically from mud slides to academic think tanks or refugee camps, has settled on at least one activity: a family-friendly adventure ropes course. Thursday, there was actual construction equipment stationed in the porte-cochère of Revel, where Straub said he would install a massive ropes course, similar to the ones at Jordan's Furniture Store in New Haven, Conn.
NEWS
April 9, 2016
ISSUE | SODA TAX Honickman is civic-minded While the article "Bottling king in thick of fight" (Sunday) mentioned many of the philanthropic contributions of Harold and Lynne Honickman, let me mention their work in trying to combat gun violence, the scourge of many of our neighborhoods. In starting Moms Against Guns and joining forces with CeaseFire PA while I served as president of the board, the Honickmans played an important role on an issue of critical importance to Philadelphia and the commonwealth.
NEWS
March 30, 2016 | By Solomon Jones, For the Daily News
THE CITY of Philadelphia's 10-year tax abatement on new construction has led to the gentrification of Philadelphia's most vulnerable communities. By giving huge breaks to those who build or refurbish housing, the tax abatement has increased property values in some of our poorest neighborhoods. Along the way, it has pushed out poor tenants through higher rents, and forced out impoverished homeowners through higher property taxes. And because 55 percent of Philadelphia property taxes go to schools, the tax abatement has also denied much-needed funding to a financially strapped School District filled with children of color.
NEWS
March 12, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
Freshman City Councilman Allan Domb offered two proposals Thursday that would add twists to Philadelphia's 10-year tax abatement on new construction and building improvements. The first would require businesses that get the abatement to use the Philadelphia Gas Works for heating. The second would double to 20 years the abatement for properties valued at $250,000 or less, to spur development in neighborhoods where the incentive hasn't taken off. "We want to give them a better benefit than everyone else is getting and help their neighborhoods even more," said Domb, a real estate developer known as Philadelphia's "Condo King.
NEWS
March 10, 2016
By Kenyatta Johnson As our communities develop, we must protect everyone, including long-term homeowners with low to moderate incomes. To ensure these residents aren't priced out of their homes, we must extend the Longtime Owner Occupancy Program (LOOP). LOOP is a 10-year real estate tax discount for longtime city homeowners whose neighborhoods are experiencing rapid development and drastic increases in property assessments under the Actual Value Initiative (AVI). Originally called "Gentrification Relief," LOOP is designed to prevent unaffordable real estate spikes in gentrifying neighborhoods.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|