CollectionsTax Assessments
IN THE NEWS

Tax Assessments

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 2, 1987 | By John Ellis, Special to The Inquirer
Joseph Polya of Rydal acknowledges that he has increased his wealth in the last few years. But it came as a bit of a surprise when he received his 1987 assessment from the Montgomery County personal-property tax department putting his worth at $6.2 million. For the second time in four years, the county had stated incorrectly that Polya's assets totaled more than $6 million. Polya estimated his assets at $200,000 in taxable securities. Polya is not alone. In Abington Township, more than 10 percent of personal- property owners were assessed incorrectly - some at larger amounts.
NEWS
September 28, 1989 | By Cynthia Mayer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Granite Run Mall, Scott Paper Co., and Sears, Roebuck & Co. in Millbourne have appealed parts of their tax assessments this fall, joining a host of other large county businesses that have done so in recent years. The latest appeals, which will be heard this month and in October, would affect the Interboro School District, the Rose Tree Media School District, and the Borough of Millbourne, among others. "Good grief," said Millbourne council member Dorothy MacNeil when told that Sears planned to appeal the tax assessment on its empty store there.
NEWS
February 20, 2013 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
The city's new property tax assessments are becoming an issue in the city controller's race, with incumbent Alan Butkovitz warning that more than 60 percent of Philadelphia homeowners are likely to face tax increases and challenger Brett Mandel accusing Butkovitz of "fear-mongering. " "A lot of very poor areas of the city, places like Germantown and Juniata Park, are seeing big increases," Butkovitz said Monday. "A lot of people in the city will be pushed out of their homes. " Mandel said his family's own taxes, on the southwest side of Center City, may come close to doubling, depending on rates and relief programs yet to be established by City Council.
NEWS
May 22, 2009 | By Joseph Tanfani, Patrick Kerkstra, and Mark Fazlollah INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The city's judges fired Joseph A. Russo from the Board of Revision of Taxes yesterday, after a scathing report from the city inspector general said he had manipulated property assessments, abused his power, and committed perjury. The sudden firing of Russo, a longtime ally of former State Sen. Vincent J. Fumo, appeared to be unprecedented in the 155-year history of the BRT, the agency that sets tax values for all properties in Philadelphia. "He did not uphold the standards expected of appointees," President Judge Pamela Pryor Dembe said.
NEWS
January 1, 1989 | By Lisa Ellis, Inquirer Staff Writer
The city Board of Revision of Taxes plans to re-evaluate its tax assessments of all homes in the Regency Hill development of Somerton as the result of a meeting last week between board officials and City Councilman Brian J. O'Neill. O'Neill, who requested the meeting Wednesday, said the board would take a second look at the market value it assigned to all 48 occupied homes in the development because they had a total of 350 unrepaired code violations and many also lacked a city-required certificate of use and occupancy.
NEWS
October 31, 2012 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
A class-action lawsuit filed by several hundred Philadelphia real-estate owners asks Commonwealth Court to void the budget deal made this year between City Council and the legislature, leading to a one-year delay in the city's use of more accurate property assessment figures. If successful, the lawsuit could reduce Philadelphia property tax bills by as much as 25 percent but create equally large holes in the city and School District budgets, totaling $150 million or more. The individuals, partnerships, and corporations listed as plaintiffs own about 1,240 parcels in the city.
NEWS
December 23, 2002
EVER SINCE shockingly high property tax assessments first started appearing in people's mailboxes, the Board of Revision of Taxes and chairman David Glancey have been the target of critics, especially on City Council. Councilman Frank DiCicco, in particular, has been especially tough in his remarks that the BRT is flawed in the way it conducts assessments. DiCicco illustrated his point when he asked the BRT for the addresses of people in his district for a mass mailing and 30,000 letters were returned with bad addresses.
NEWS
March 3, 1991 | By Bryon Kurzenabe, Special to The Inquirer
Cinnaminson Township's proposed $5.4 million budget for 1991 would include an overall increase of more than 31 percent in property taxes. The rise was brought on by increased tax delinquencies and higher insurance rates, according to township officials, and might prompt layoffs of municipal employees and school crossing guards. Under the spending plan introduced last week, the local purpose tax would be 21.6 cents for each $100 of assessed property value. The old rate was 32.2 cents, but many residents could pay higher taxes for 1991 because property assessments recently rose 120 percent.
NEWS
October 1, 1989 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
The Springfield school board has responded to a lawsuit that seeks to unseat eight of its members by filing a lawsuit of its own. D. Barry Gibbons, the district's attorney, said Thursday that he had filed an "abuse of process" suit against the 10 district residents who sued the school board. The residents contend that the school board violated the state school code by adopting school budgets that appropriate more than 25 mills worth of property tax revenue for expenses other than professional salaries.
NEWS
December 8, 1988 | By Patrick Scott, Special to The Inquirer
Easttown officials on Monday proposed a 6 percent increase in spending in next year's township budget and only a slight tax increase to fund library operations. During a brief budget hearing at the supervisors' meeting, board Chairman Samuel Pilotti said there would be no tax increase to meet township operating expenses and that the township's total expenses for next year are budgeted at $3,375,000 compared with a 1988 operating budget of $3.2 million. According to township manager Gene Williams, the general fund tax will remain the same because of additional revenue generated by the township's real estate transfer tax. Williams said the 6 percent increase in spending resulted from the inflated costs of "general operating materials and supplies for the township.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 9, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
A five-year pilot program in Gloucester County that shifted the job of property-tax assessments from municipalities to a county office - an approach first met with some skepticism - is being hailed as a successful "tax-assessment reform" worthy of replication. The creation of the county Assessor's Office has collectively saved the county's 24 towns millions of dollars, according to a recent county report. But whether the county-based assessment office - new to New Jersey, though standard in dozens of other states, including Pennsylvania - will be a model for other counties isn't clear.
NEWS
April 7, 2015 | BY LARA WITT, Daily News Staff Writer wittl@phillynews.com, 215-854-5927
AS SPRING CLEANING gets underway in the city, the Germantown Special Services District is attracting attention for its efforts. Since 2013, cleaning has been "the No. 1 priority for us and for business owners, too," said Anthony Dean, the district's leader. "Cleaning is key to increasing greater development in the area. " The district contracted with a firm called Ready, Willing and Able to maintain the Germantown Avenue and Chelten Avenue business corridors. The firm provides transitional housing and work to homeless men through the city's Office of Supportive Housing to help them live independently.
NEWS
February 26, 2013 | Neil Budde & Carla Robinson, AXISPHILLY.org
To read the original version of this story, go to AxisPhilly.org . PUTTING AN estimate on what a house is worth is not an exact science. Invariably, when a building sells, tax estimates of what it's worth will be somewhat off-target. But how off-target can it be and still be considered fair? According to the tax-assessment industry, fairness is from 80 to 120 percent of a home's sale price. They call it the acceptable "standard of deviation. " Based on an analysis of homes that sold in the past two years, Philadelphia tax assessors seemingly did not meet that standard in 40 percent of the cases.
NEWS
February 20, 2013 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
The city's new property tax assessments are becoming an issue in the city controller's race, with incumbent Alan Butkovitz warning that more than 60 percent of Philadelphia homeowners are likely to face tax increases and challenger Brett Mandel accusing Butkovitz of "fear-mongering. " "A lot of very poor areas of the city, places like Germantown and Juniata Park, are seeing big increases," Butkovitz said Monday. "A lot of people in the city will be pushed out of their homes. " Mandel said his family's own taxes, on the southwest side of Center City, may come close to doubling, depending on rates and relief programs yet to be established by City Council.
NEWS
February 15, 2013 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer ransomj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
H EY, PHILADELPHIANS, your property assessments are on the way. The city on Friday was to begin mailing new assessments to owners under the city's new property-tax system, known as the Actual Value Initiative. Wondering how you can tell if your property has been assessed too high? For starters, if you live in a two-story house but are listed as having a three-story, that's an obvious sign you've been over-assessed. You also can visit the Office of Property Assessment (OPA)
NEWS
October 31, 2012 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
A class-action lawsuit filed by several hundred Philadelphia real-estate owners asks Commonwealth Court to void the budget deal made this year between City Council and the legislature, leading to a one-year delay in the city's use of more accurate property assessment figures. If successful, the lawsuit could reduce Philadelphia property tax bills by as much as 25 percent but create equally large holes in the city and School District budgets, totaling $150 million or more. The individuals, partnerships, and corporations listed as plaintiffs own about 1,240 parcels in the city.
NEWS
May 9, 2010 | By Patrick Kerkstra INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Board of Revision of Taxes is hanging by a thread, and on May 18 Philadelphia voters will be handed a pair of scissors. If they approve in next week's primary, the BRT will be disbanded, bringing an end to the troubled 156-year-old agency, whose work helps determine the tax due on every property in Philadelphia. "Any Philadelphian who cares about a fair, accurate, legitimate property-assessment system should vote yes on this ballot question," Mayor Nutter said. "Any citizen who is horrified by the activities and operations of the BRT and its board should be voting yes on this ballot question.
NEWS
May 9, 2010 | By Patrick Kerkstra, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Board of Revision of Taxes is hanging by a thread, and on May 18 Philadelphia voters will be handed a pair of scissors. If they approve in next week's primary, the BRT will be disbanded, bringing an end to the troubled 156-year-old agency, whose work helps determine the tax due on every property in Philadelphia. "Any Philadelphian who cares about a fair, accurate, legitimate property-assessment system should vote yes on this ballot question," Mayor Nutter said. "Any citizen who is horrified by the activities and operations of the BRT and its board should be voting yes on this ballot question.
NEWS
December 1, 2009 | By Patrick Kerkstra INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The six members of the beleaguered Board of Revision of Taxes defended their management of the agency, the role of patronage in its operations, and the performance of their employees at a hearing yesterday. Aggrieved and defiant, the board members faulted City Council and the Nutter administration for Philadelphia's inequitable and inaccurate property-tax-assessment system, and said The Inquirer and the good-government watchdog Committee of Seventy had unfairly tarnished their reputations.
NEWS
October 11, 2009 | By Joseph Tanfani, Mark Fazlollah, Tom Infield, and Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The historic deal that promises to remake the property-assessment system in Philadelphia started with a meeting between the city's powerful Democratic leader and a sick old man. U.S. Rep. Robert A. Brady, the party chief, got a call from Enrico "Ricky" Foglia, the 80-year-old executive director of the Board of Revision of Taxes. They went way back, coming up in politics together in the 34th Ward in Overbrook. As they sat together at the ward clubhouse on Haverford Avenue, Brady was gentle.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|