CollectionsTax Cap
IN THE NEWS

Tax Cap

NEWS
January 1, 1997 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Chester County lawyer and frequent Democratic candidate Samuel Stretton has a few questions he wants answered about Chester County's 1997 budget and its record tax increase. He specifically wants to know why Chester County Court Judge Howard Riley lifted a 25-mill cap imposed by state law for general-fund spending with little or no evidence from the county that it was necessary to exceed the cap. Yesterday, Riley ruled that Stretton will get his day in court on Jan. 10. "I want a serious review," Stretton said.
NEWS
November 18, 1996 | By Peter Nicholas, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Last spring, a city tax board finished a sweeping reappraisal of Philadelphia properties. Officials raised property values for thousands of homeowners but said the pain would be tolerable. No one's tax bill would spike more than 15 percent, they said. Promises, promises. The Board of Revision of Taxes quietly exceeded the cap in about 8,900 cases, raising assessed values by more than 15 percent. The homeowners will see the results on their 1997 real-estate tax bills, which rise in lockstep with assessments.
NEWS
November 14, 1996 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Spending by the township is expected to rise by more than 10 percent next year, but property taxes will go down. That's because a 0.5 percent earned-income tax that supervisors adopted in the spring provided a new source of revenue. The proposed budget totals $3,071,000, up from about $2,700,000 this year. The property-tax rate would be reduced from 19 mills to 14. The owner of a home assessed at the township average of $10,000 would pay $192, down from $242 this year. At a work session Tuesday, the supervisors were quick to announce that the preliminary budget was the first in a long time that did not exceed the legal tax limit of 14 mills for second-class townships.
NEWS
January 13, 1996 | By John Murphy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT Inquirer staff writer Bob Fernandez contributed to this article
Desperate to erase a $1.8 million deficit and pull itself back from the brink of financial disaster, Bristol Township yesterday asked Bucks County Court to exceed a state cap on property taxes by 49 percent. Managing Director Carmen Raddi laid out proposed details of the budget relief to Judge Edward Biester, who appeared taken aback by the complexity of the plan. Raddi asked the judge to allow the township to increase the property tax for its general fund to 52 mills, from the current state maximum of 35 mills.
NEWS
February 15, 1994 | BY TONY SNOW
Political ideas that seem swell in Washington often bomb the moment they move beyond the Beltway. Nothing better illustrates this phenomenon than the rage for letting the federal government "fix" the nation's health-care system. Rep. Jim Cooper, an ambitious Democrat from Tennessee, recently flew to Dallas to pitch his reform plan to 100 state directors and chairs for the Ross Perot-inspired United We Stand America. Cooper is Washington's hottest political property because he pitted his proposal against the Clinton leviathan and won. The surest sign of his success appeared when business lobbies jumped on the bandwagon in early February.
NEWS
April 27, 1991 | By R.A. Zaldivar, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The Bush administration is considering a tax on workers' health benefits to finance medical coverage for the more than 30 million uninsured Americans, Louis W. Sullivan, health and human services secretary, says. The approach, which Sullivan refers to as a "tax cap," would subject employer-paid health benefits above a certain dollar amount to tax as personal income. "We are looking at a number of strategies, such as a 'tax cap' on employer-provided health care to provide funds for those who don't have (insurance)
NEWS
May 24, 1990 | By John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer
The debate on capping the city wage tax was lively. The bill to do so is probably dead. Despite a state Senate vote yesterday to lock the wage tax for Philadelphia residents at its current 4.96 percent, House leaders say the measure won't even get to a House vote. The sponsor, Sen. M. Joseph Rocks, R-Philadelphia, says even though City Council and Mayor Goode now appear opposed to raising the tax, the cap would prevent a change of heart or a possible court order. Rocks' colleagues say his motives are purely political because he's facing a tough re-election fight in November.
NEWS
May 24, 1990 | By Robert Zausner, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Republican-run Senate took a jab at the Goode administration by passing a bill to cap the Philadelphia wage tax at the current 4.96 percent for city residents, but yesterday's action appeared to be the measure's last hurrah. The Senate voted 27-21 along party lines to send the bill, sponsored by Sen. M. Joseph Rocks (R., Phila.), to the House, which is controlled by Democrats and will likely let the legislation die without a floor vote. "It's very, very bad for the city to have the Philadelphia wage tax debated on the House floor.
NEWS
December 3, 1987 | By Erin Kennedy, Special to The Inquirer
The Warminster Board of Supervisors has approved a $9.26 million preliminary budget for 1988 that would hold the line on taxes for the second year in a row. The budget called for the overall tax rate to remain at 31.25 mills per $1,000 of assessed valuation. At that rate, a homeowner whose property is assessed at the township average of $7,000 would pay $218.75 in taxes next year. The $9.26 million preliminary budget is $1.84 million less than last year's total budget of $11.1 million.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
|
|
|
|
|