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Tax Court

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NEWS
December 20, 1992 | By Henry J. Holcomb, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Gov. Florio will announce tomorrow that he is nominating 16 women to New Jersey judgeships, including the first three women ever named to the state Tax Court, top administration sources say. The move, rumored to be in the works for weeks, would bring to 44 the total number of women that Florio has nominated to the bench during his three years in office. That is 10 more than his Republican predecessor, Thomas H. Kean, nominated in eight years, according to administration figures.
NEWS
May 4, 1993 | By Diane Mastrull, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Francine I. Axelrad, Cherry Hill's solicitor since 1988, was sworn in yesterday as a tax court judge in New Jersey but was promptly assigned to Gloucester County's besieged Family Court. In an hour-long ceremony featuring more wisecracks than stuffy legalese, Axelrad of Camden County was welcomed to Gloucester County - and warned about what she was getting into. The Family Court has been described as a security nightmare by Sheriff James Hogan and the two judges that have presided there for more than seven years.
NEWS
November 30, 1995 | By Matt White, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Faced with a 60-day deadline to refund about $4.5 million in taxes and interest to Coastal Eagle Point Refinery, township officials fear that state requirements will make it impossible to pay on time. "I don't expect any official action to be taken before the new year," said West Deptford Administrator Gerald White. What would happen if West Deptford missed the Jan. 5 payment deadline was unclear yesterday. Both White and lawyers for Coastal said they had not looked into the possible repercussions, and government officials gave varying views on what, if anything, would happen.
BUSINESS
July 14, 1987 | By CAROL MATHEWS and HENRY BLOCK, Special to the Daily News
Both taxpayers and the Internal Revenue Service are bound to follow the tax code. However, occasionally there is a problem - taxpayers and the IRS do not see eye to eye in their interpretation of tax laws. When the opposing parties come to loggerheads, taxpayers often choose to take their cases to Tax Court. While the court is also bound to follow the tax code (unless it is found to be unconstitutional), many taxpayers have been the victors, and their deductions have been allowed.
NEWS
February 24, 1993 | By Josh Zimmer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Like many municipalities, Delran saw tax dollars slip away last year when commercial properties received reductions in their assessments, either by appealing to the state or county tax court or by settling with the township. The successful tax appeals "have taken a significant toll on municipalities (throughout the state) over the last several years," said Jay Johnston, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs spokesman. But when it comes to gaining by the system, Hunters Glen Apartments has historically taken the prize among Delran's commercial properties.
NEWS
December 26, 1993 | By Jane M. Reynolds, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Although some officials had pushed for it, a bill changing the state tax code did not come up for a vote in the legislature last week, meaning it cannot be voted on until next year. West Deptford Mayor David Shields, among others, wanted to change the Freeze Act to ease some of the problems the township has been having with a multimillion-dollar tax appeal by the Coastal Eagle Point Oil Co. "We had hoped (the legislature) would have acted on it because of the devastation it can cause municipalities," Shields said of the act. The Freeze Act works this way: A judge in a property tax appeal case is obliged to "freeze" the assessed value of the property at a level the judge determines to be fair.
NEWS
May 23, 1986 | By Chris Conway, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Over the protests of business and industry groups, a General Assembly committee yesterday approved legislation that would allow municipalities to continue to levy taxes on huge oil-storage tanks. The bill, which now goes to the full Assembly, is intended to prevent municipalities from losing millions of dollars in tax revenues - losses that could result if the tanks were removed from the local tax rolls because of recent tax court rulings. In a hearing yesterday before the Assembly Appropriations Committee, representatives of several communities - including Greenwich Township in Gloucester County - urged the panel to send the bill to the full Assembly for a vote.
NEWS
October 26, 1986 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Mobil Oil Co. balked at paying taxes on its fuel-storage tanks in Greenwich Township last year, Mayor Francis "Duffy" McDevitt said he feared the action could throw the entire New Jersey tax system into chaos. Greenwich, like many industrial towns in New Jersey, leans heavily on its commercial tax base to pay its bills, said McDevitt. If that tax base were sharply reduced, as Mobil had requested in the Tax Court of New Jersey, he said the burden would shift to homeowners and small businesses.
NEWS
March 20, 2016 | By Maddie Hanna, TRENTON BUREAU
Gov. Christie on Friday proposed a two-year freeze on taxing nonprofit hospitals, some of which are facing demands for payments from municipalities. The Republican governor also announced a commission to review the long-standing hospital property-tax exemption statute and recommend changes to the law. "It gives us time to come up not just with a solution but with the right solution, and that's what we should be looking to do," Christie said at a news conference in Elizabeth, N.J. Since a tax court ruled in June 2015 that a Morristown hospital should not have been exempt from property taxes, a number of hospitals have seen their tax-exempt status challenged.
NEWS
March 3, 1991 | By Bryon Kurzenabe, Special to The Inquirer
Cinnaminson Township's proposed $5.4 million budget for 1991 would include an overall increase of more than 31 percent in property taxes. The rise was brought on by increased tax delinquencies and higher insurance rates, according to township officials, and might prompt layoffs of municipal employees and school crossing guards. Under the spending plan introduced last week, the local purpose tax would be 21.6 cents for each $100 of assessed property value. The old rate was 32.2 cents, but many residents could pay higher taxes for 1991 because property assessments recently rose 120 percent.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 19, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Before and after Anthony M. Lario was a New Jersey Superior Court judge, daughter Lynn Miller said, he was proud of his work as a pro bono lawyer. "I can't tell you how many times there were food items and pastries left on our back steps," Miller said. "Left by people he would help and not charge. " Those clients, she said, were often "a lot of immigrants . . . people he knew could not afford it. " On Sunday, May 15, Judge Lario, 95, of Cherry Hill, a Superior Court judge in Tax Court from 1979 to 1990, died at Methodist Hospital.
NEWS
April 7, 2016 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - The bad news keeps piling up for Atlantic City, just days from running out of cash. A day after the State of New Jersey filed suit to compel the city to turn over tax payments due to its school district on April 15 before it meets its own payroll, a judge issued a ruling that opens the door to still more court battles with Borgata Hotel & Casino over past tax appeals. Atlantic County Superior Court Judge Julio Mendez ruled the city had violated a settlement agreement to repay $88.2 million to Borgata for appeals filed for the years 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014.
NEWS
March 20, 2016 | By Maddie Hanna, TRENTON BUREAU
Gov. Christie on Friday proposed a two-year freeze on taxing nonprofit hospitals, some of which are facing demands for payments from municipalities. The Republican governor also announced a commission to review the long-standing hospital property-tax exemption statute and recommend changes to the law. "It gives us time to come up not just with a solution but with the right solution, and that's what we should be looking to do," Christie said at a news conference in Elizabeth, N.J. Since a tax court ruled in June 2015 that a Morristown hospital should not have been exempt from property taxes, a number of hospitals have seen their tax-exempt status challenged.
NEWS
June 13, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the same day that Atlantic City's government learned it would receive $6.8 million in state aid to help balance next year's budget, it also agreed to dole out many times that in a refund to its biggest taxpayer - the Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa. The resort's top-grossing casino will get back $88.25 million under a settlement it reached late Tuesday with the city on its property taxes - and the refund could grow even larger if the city loses a...
NEWS
March 15, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY New Mayor Don Guardian faces a Friday deadline to apply for $20 million in state aid to get this struggling resort through the next budget year. As gambling revenue and property values keep plummeting, Guardian was emphatic Wednesday before the nine-member Atlantic City Council during his State of the City address: If the state doesn't come through on a $20 million transitional aid/essential-services grant, the city will have to absorb a 47 percent municipal tax increase - or 65 cents per $100 of assessed property value - for the fiscal year starting July 1. The projected $262 million budget the mayor presented to the council did not include state aid from the Department of Community Affairs.
NEWS
October 23, 2013 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Citing the sharp decline in the casino industry's fortunes, the Tax Court of New Jersey on Monday slashed the tax liability of the Shore resort's biggest taxpayer, the Borgata Hotel & Casino. The ruling, reducing the property's assessment by 61 percent in each of two years, 2009 and 2010, caused dismay among city officials over the lost revenue. They vowed to appeal. If upheld, the blow to the city may be the biggest of many, tax experts said. Some similar but lesser tax disputes already have been resolved.
NEWS
March 1, 2013
D EAR HARRY: I am a recently hired regional manager for a large franchising company. My job requires thatI own and know how to use a computer to submit daily reports from remote locations. My computer is a Mac, and I had some problems getting it synchronized with the company's large-capacity PC. As a result, the company shared with me the cost of a PC laptop. My tax preparer said that there was just no way I could get a tax deduction for it, even if my boss says it was required and will support that statement in writing.
NEWS
August 17, 2012
DEAR HARRY: Back in 2010, my girlfriend and I sold our home in the Philadelphia suburbs for $704,000. There was a gain to each of us of $170,000. Our accountant took the exclusion of $250,000 for each of us. We are now in a fight with an IRS agent who says we are entitled to an exclusion of only $250,000 for the home; that not being married cannot give us a bigger exclusion than a married couple would have. His supervisor, to whom we appealed, agreed with his agent. Our accountant wants to appeal further.
NEWS
August 1, 2008 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cash-strapped New Jersey is losing more than $345 million a year in uncollected sales and occupancy taxes on condominiums that are being rented like motel rooms, according to the Greater Wildwood Hotel & Motel Association. The 167-member group, which includes the owners of lodgings in Wildwood, Wildwood Crest and North Wildwood, announced yesterday that it is suing the state Division of Taxation to compel it to collect the proper taxes on condos and other facilities rented on a transient basis.
NEWS
August 1, 2008 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
WILDWOOD - Cash-strapped New Jersey is losing more than $345 million a year in uncollected sales and occupancy taxes on condominiums that are being rented like motel rooms, according to the Greater Wildwood Hotel & Motel Association. The 167-member group, which includes the owners of lodgings in Wildwood, Wildwood Crest and North Wildwood, announced yesterday that it is suing the state Division of Taxation to compel it to collect the proper taxes on condos and other facilities rented on a transient basis.
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